Minor Threat

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 2006 (The 2007 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? No  what's this?


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Minor Threat (1981)

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Minor Threat (1981)

Minor Threat @ Wikipedia

Minor Threat Videos

Will Minor Threat be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

17 comments so far (post your own)

are you shitting me, the diy kings. if minor threat as a group doesnt make it, ian damn deserves it. dischord records has been up and runningg for over 20 years and with the band fugazi he actually managed to transcend punk. not even rollins could produce music of such a high quality. it would be an insult to anyone who so much as went through a punk phase not to induct him within 5 years.

Posted by captain fresh on Monday, 10.9.06 @ 14:31pm


ian mckaye is a genius, his first band is amazing, so is dischord. anything ian is a part of should be recognised by many more

Posted by Chris on Sunday, 10.22.06 @ 18:49pm


though i want both fugazi and minor threat in, i would be happier with just Ian getting in he has done so much for punk,hardcore, emo and just aobut every other subgenre to rock the man is a god of punk get him in, or at least one of his bands

Posted by Sam on Monday, 02.19.07 @ 05:24am


now these guys really deserve it. they helped me grow up. you learn life lessons from these guys. kids are still going through thier mt faze

Posted by bobby on Tuesday, 03.20.07 @ 12:17pm


A band that coined the phrase "Straight Edge" that evolved into a worldwide movement sure deserves to be in.

Posted by Richie Riot on Friday, 10.12.07 @ 19:02pm


D.C.'s Finest.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Thursday, 12.11.08 @ 10:23am


Just...yes. The first in the line for hardcore as far as I'm concerned, with Bad Brains, Fugazi and Black Flag running up pretty close.

Posted by Jack on Monday, 02.2.09 @ 14:13pm


They absolutely should get it. You MUST recognize the 80s hardcore bands, because ever though they were low on the radar, they made tsunami waves for the future of music. Bad Brains, Black Flag, Minor Threat, Dead Kennedys. They also need to accept Bad Religion, The Vandals, and NOFX.

Posted by John L on Friday, 12.2.11 @ 23:14pm


One thing is for sure: Minor Threat is a minor footnote in the overall history of music.

The canonization of '80s hardcore punk mystifies me. Few, if any, of these bands had any meaningful or extensive influence or impact beyond the hardcore punk scene. Let's face it, this current obsession with hardcore punk (which is limited mainly to hipsters) is a mere fad that will soon pass. It may be fashionable to namedrop Fugazi and Minor Threat currently, but will they be remembered in another century? I doubt it. If you think I'm wrong, just look at what happened to calypso, the folk revival, new jack swing, disco*, and other fad genres that have since been confined to the dustbins of history.

*I enjoy some disco, mostly Donna Summer and The Bee Gees.

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 04.19.12 @ 21:32pm


The canonization of '80s hardcore punk mystifies me. Few, if any, of these bands had any meaningful or extensive influence or impact beyond the hardcore punk scene. Let's face it, this current obsession with hardcore punk (which is limited mainly to hipsters) is a mere fad that will soon pass. It may be fashionable to namedrop Fugazi and Minor Threat currently, but will they be remembered in another century? I doubt it. If you think I'm wrong, just look at what happened to calypso, the folk revival, new jack swing, disco*, and other fad genres that have since been confined to the dustbins of history.

*I enjoy some disco, mostly Donna Summer and The Bee Gees.

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 04.19.12 @ 21:32pm
--------------------------------------------------
You can bash the hardcore punk scene all you want, but it did have some impact further down the line. Elements of it crept into Seattle, & was subsequently exposed via Nirvana, Soundgarden, Mudhoney, etc. There are also bits & pieces floating through nu metal later down the line.

Likewise, you mention the folk revival. The obvious instances where an influence could be heard was in The Byrds, & later the Jeff. Airplane, & the Grateful Dead, w/in an electrified form. You can also say that the singer-songwriters of the early 70's had a little of it floating through their systems.

I know you don't necessarily care for the mid-to-late 60's, or anything from the 90's onward, doesn't necessarily mean it didn't stick w/other people. In fact, you said you felt disoc would be lost to the pages of history, yet you were able to dredge up the Bee Gees & Donna Summer :)

I think Peter, Paul, & Mary, & Black Flag, may have already reached the levels of the Bee Gees & Donna Summer... perhaps...

Posted by Cheesecrop on Friday, 04.20.12 @ 07:41am


I guess I should have clarified my statement about disco more. What I meant was that there is good disco and that the best disco has survived (i.e., Donna Summer, The Bee Gees, Boney M, etc.), while the dross is either forgotten or banished to oldies stations. The fact that Donna Summer cracked the nominations list for this year's RRHOF demonstrates that disco does indeed have its meritable acts. IMHO, Summer should have made it in, but I'll discuss that in detail on her page.

While I can say good things about disco, I have nothing positive to say about the other genres I listed. You brought up the singer-songwriter movement, that's another era I despise.

I'll respond to some of your other points later when I have more time.

Posted by Zach on Friday, 04.20.12 @ 09:30am


Zach, you sound like the Rockhall and Jann Wenner when you say you despise entire genres/eras out of hand. You'd fit right in on their nominating committee.

Posted by Dezmond on Friday, 04.20.12 @ 12:19pm


Dezmond - Don't feed the troll.

Posted by Gassman on Friday, 04.20.12 @ 12:27pm


No, not really, Dezmond. I know enough to know which genres have had the greatest impact on music as an overall art form and which ones haven't.

I'm only stating my personal views when I express a love or hate of a particular genre/era/band/musician/singer. I'm not imposing my views on others, so don't take it to heart.

I have no desire to join the nominating committee of of the RRHOF. I'm flattered that you'd compare with that waste of oxygen, Jann Wenner. I'd love to see synthpop, glam rock and new wave receive greater recognition in the RRHOF.

Gassman, I've been posting here for a while, so I don't see how I fit your image of a troll. I back up my arguments with reasons and evidence, as seen on the pages of Joan Jett and Screamin' Jay Hawkins, both of whom I strongly support for inductions.

Posted by Zach on Friday, 04.20.12 @ 13:12pm


every genre has good music, you can't completely disregard them.

apart from crunkcore of course.

Posted by GFW on Friday, 04.20.12 @ 13:47pm


I like the Bad Brains. Of course they never called themselves a hardcore band.

Posted by astrodog on Friday, 04.20.12 @ 20:29pm


I find it strange that Minor Threat is on here but Fugazi isn't. Minor Threat is obviously influential in hardcore, they even coined the term "straight edge", and they are underrated musicians. But Fugazi are one of the most influential, experimental bands of all time. Minor Threat influenced almost every band after them within the confines of hardcore, but Fugazi influenced pretty much every band with any serious interest in or association with DIY and independent music.

Posted by Bloody Punkins on Monday, 07.21.14 @ 11:50am


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