Jimmy Page

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 2007 (The 2008 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? No  what's this?

Jimmy Page @ Wikipedia

Jimmy Page Videos

Will Jimmy Page be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

111 comments so far (post your own)

hands down, broke the gates of hard rock open and let everyone in. black sabbath just as good. but Jimmy Page made it in a year earlier. With songs like Communication Break Down, and Dazed and Confused, and How Many Mroe times on Led Zeppelins first album. who can argue that jimmy page was the first pioneer to let heavey rock into our musical world.

Posted by steve on Tuesday, 11.7.06 @ 00:44am


Obviously Page made important contributions as a member of Led Zeppelin. But inducting him as a solo artist is just plain stupid. I dare you to listen through all of Page/Coverdale without trying to hang yourself from a ceiling fan.

Posted by Kit on Tuesday, 11.7.06 @ 00:48am


I don't think individuals from great groups should get in when the group effort so far outshines any later work.

Posted by Jack on Monday, 02.5.07 @ 12:46pm


People are influenced by the way he played. People wouldn't vote 'Led Zeppelin' in the most influential guitarists. Therefore, i think he should go in.

Posted by James on Wednesday, 02.21.07 @ 16:27pm


Jimmy Page is the best guitarist ever. your stupid if you think different becasue I saw a Led Zeppelin concert the the Minnesota Orchestra played with a cover band. The orchestra played the riffs Jimmy wrote for his guitar. he arranged Led Zeppelin's songs, wrote the best riffs of all time and porduced his albums. so he will get in with out a doubt

Posted by Zach Doyle on Saturday, 03.17.07 @ 21:37pm


jimmy page sucks and is overrated.

Posted by randolph on Sunday, 04.1.07 @ 21:47pm


best guitar player of all time...no doubt about that...blows clapton and hendrix out of the water...can handrix write songs as well as page? no...can clapton? no...and can either of them play that well on acoustic either? i think not...oh yeah...the whole soloing thing too...hahaha

Posted by Spew on Sunday, 04.8.07 @ 01:55am


I would actually put him last among the ex-Yardbirds (Beck beating out Clapton as well), and of those only Beck was potentially better than Hendrix.

Let's not even get into Zappa and Fripp, both of whom do more on a single album than Page has accomplished in his career.

Posted by William on Sunday, 04.8.07 @ 18:47pm


jimmy page is awesome, no question. He created the rock god image. There's only 4 hard rock guitarists that are as good as him or better. jimi, eric clapton, david guilmor, jeff beck

Posted by jim on Monday, 05.28.07 @ 10:06am


Page was a good song writer, no doubt, especially his acoustic stuff and some of his clean electric stuff (The Rain Song). On flip side, I never understood what people saw in his lead playing. I always found it dull, uninspiring and in many cases downright sloppy! I recently watched the Song Remains The Same movie on VH1 and the soloing made me cringe.

Posted by jon on Monday, 07.2.07 @ 13:49pm


What has Page really done since he left Zep? He hasn't been very influential since Zep.

now, if you want to nominate a guitar god who continue breaks the boundries of music, the Adrian Belew is your man.

Posted by Frank on Monday, 08.27.07 @ 13:46pm


Paige was offered to play for the Yardbirds first but suggested Beck. Page was better in there eyes

Posted by Zack on Thursday, 09.27.07 @ 16:50pm


Hendrix!

Posted by StarMan on Monday, 10.1.07 @ 13:32pm


Oh, I forgot BB King would give them a run for their money as would Bo Didley, however, Iwould still go with Hendrix!

Posted by StarMan on Monday, 10.1.07 @ 13:34pm


Jeff Beck = BEST EVER.... Guess What: Listen to the TRUTH album, you will VOMIT when you see how much someone else RIPPED OFF JEFF BECK...

Posted by abcdefg on Thursday, 10.4.07 @ 09:16am


I think Page's electric work is kind of sloppy and spontaneous especially compared to someone like Clapton or Hendrix

Posted by Ts on Saturday, 10.27.07 @ 13:52pm


Page will get in because of what he did w/ zep. Hendrix is probably more physically gifted than all of the above mentioned, but in my opinion Gilmour is the BEST. The end product is what matters and he delivers the best solos of all time! Listen to comfortably numb or even time by Pink Floyd.

Posted by Chris Davidson on Friday, 11.23.07 @ 18:22pm


Thank you for including Gilmour, and your right. Why is it that people rarely mention him. Why is it always the whole hendrix, clapton, page thing? Is it because he is less flashy?? Whatever the reason he is the superior guitarists and when is comes to solos, don't even get me started. Comfortably Numb, damn right!

Posted by tom larson on Friday, 11.23.07 @ 18:25pm


Jimmy Page - Good-ish rhythm guitar - embarrassing Lead and a unscrupulous blackguard who took other people's work reworked it and gave them no credit - "I'm Confused" by Jake Holmes - "The Lemon Song" being an inferior take on Howlin' Wolf's "The Killing Floor"... I could go on.

He should never be admitted.

Posted by Dave on Thursday, 12.13.07 @ 14:28pm


"Jimmy Page - Good-ish rhythm guitar - embarrassing Lead and a unscrupulous blackguard who took other people's work reworked it and gave them no credit - "I'm Confused" by Jake Holmes - "The Lemon Song" being an inferior take on Howlin' Wolf's "The Killing Floor"... I could go on."- Dave

What else would you expect from a Satan worshiper??

Honesty??

Posted by interviewer on Thursday, 12.13.07 @ 23:29pm


Page's work with the firm and some of his playing with Coverdale was good but he really didn't distinguish himself. I was disappointed with his career after Zeppelin split up.

But what can we expect from a person that was so involved in drug use, the occult and his penchant for not crediting others for the work they created that he used. Hopefully he has come to terms with his own misdeeds and is thankful he still able to rebuild part of his tarnished image.

This article addresses many of the questions in THE THIEVING MAGPIES:

Jimmy Page's Dubious Recording Legacy

These excerpts from the last two paragraphs sum things up.

The evidence is laid out. It is up to you, gentle reader, to assess whether Jimmy Page and Led Zeppelin deserve the prestige they have been accorded. Now, this may appear to be nothing but gratuitous Page-bashing. Far from it. To this day, Jimmy Page is unacknowledged as one of the two the greatest psychedelic guitar players ever. The other one is not Jimi Hendrix, but rather the aforementioned Syd Barrett. Page's criminally underrated work with the Yardbirds and on countless sessions (take note of his hypnotic work on Donovan's "Sunshine Superman") reveal him to have set the standard for lysergic discord par excellence.

Further, in light of the fact that Page played on 60% of everything released in Britian between 1963-66 and then adding his work with the Yardbirds and Led Zeppelin, he is undoubtedly the most recorded major guitarist ever. His fretwork itself is never in question. Even on the lightweight session material he appears on, Page's guitar playing itself is impeccable (which is amazing if you consider that the majority of those forgotten groups should not have been within ear-shot of a studio). But it his habit for putting his name on others materials that is being examined here, not his guitar sorcery.

Posted by zepfan2 on Saturday, 01.5.08 @ 14:53pm


BTW, Pages is currently involved in various charity concerts and charity work particularly the Action for Brazil's Children Trust (ABC Trust), founded by his wife Jimena Gomez-Paratcha in 1998.

Page's work with
ABC Trust has helped cover a multitude of past trangressions in my opinion.

Love the 02 concert too

Still a Zepfan

Posted by zepfan2 on Saturday, 01.5.08 @ 15:00pm


By himself, no. Page already got in with the Yardbirds and Zeppelin, and he didn't change rock as a solo artist.

Posted by gregon on Tuesday, 01.8.08 @ 21:17pm


What has he done as a solo artist?

Posted by SSR on Thursday, 02.28.08 @ 17:41pm


I don't think he'll ever be inducted as a solo artist. The vast majority of his career work has been with Led Zeppelin and The Yardbirds...both already inducted. He's done some side work ("Hurdy-Gurdy Man" by Donovan comes to mind), and he was in some band with Paul Rodgers...name escapes me... and had a hit or two, but not much else.

Posted by Terry on Thursday, 02.28.08 @ 18:56pm


Jimmy Page and Paul Rodgers were members of The Firm. As impressive as this might seem, they were not a very good band in my opinion. Their biggest hit was "Radioactive" which had almost no guitar and was not worthy of Page at all. I've never cared for Paul Rodgers.

Posted by Metalsmith on Friday, 02.29.08 @ 15:45pm


I've never cared for Paul Rodgers.

Posted by Metalsmith on Friday, 02.29.08 @ 15:45pm

Now this surprises me Metalsmith. Paul Rodgers has one of the greatest voices in RnR history.

Posted by Dameon on Friday, 02.29.08 @ 17:07pm


I don't think so. He strains too much and it's discordant to me. For greatest singers in history, I think of Paul McCartney, Steve Winwood, Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Robert Plant, Ronnie James Dio, Freddie Mercury, Ann Wilson, Bon Scott, Steve Perry, Bruce Dickinson, Mickey Thomas, Axl Rose, Sebastian Bach, people like that with either a lot of power or great melody behind their voices. Paul Rodgers is just hoarsely yelling most of the time. But I know a lot of people think of that as the rock voice, so if that's what you like, go for it.

Posted by Metalsmith on Friday, 02.29.08 @ 19:01pm


Hey, Metalsmith...Another man who was a very good vocalist was Mike Smith of the Dave Clark 5, who passed away yesterday. If you get a chance, go to youtube and just listen to him in concert footage performing "Glad All Over" & Bits & Pieces"...he could really belt out a song! He had both great power and melody.

Posted by Terry on Friday, 02.29.08 @ 19:18pm


I'm sorry to hear that. It's a shame to lose an innovator.

Posted by Metalsmith on Friday, 02.29.08 @ 19:22pm


Yes, very sad...especially since it was 11 days before their induction into the HoF. They were part of my introduction into rock music, so I really have a soft spot for them.

Posted by Terry on Friday, 02.29.08 @ 19:26pm


Led Zeppelin extended an already well-established sound by Yardbirds (long before Page), Cream (1966), Syd Barrett's Pink Floyd (1967), Hendrix (1967).

Jimmy Plagiarist stole many songs from others as he jumped on the bandwagon of an already well-established sound.

Watch the Earl's Court (1975) videos on Youtube. Jimmy Plagiarist gets lost during songs.

Mostly, the guy made up for bad playing with big hair, magical costumes and dorky marionette stage moves.

Watching that old-time footage leads you to one belief -- they were Led Spinal Tap.

Posted by Craig on Saturday, 03.8.08 @ 04:52am


Led Zeppelin may have had a similar focus as the bands you mention (that is, musicianship and songwriting capability) but as far as actual sound, they had nothing in common with any era of Pink Floyd. They had a much cleaner, less abstract sound than The Yardbirds or Hendrix. They weren't as bluesy as Cream. And none of these other bands ever played acoustic. So instead of saying that Led Zeppelin stole their sound from earlier groups, it would be more accurate to say the early hard rock bands shared a common musical background and motivation. I understand, however, that you feel like a bigger person when you insult Led Zeppelin because they are more popular than your favourite. So congratulations on making yourself into a complete jackass.

Posted by Metalsmith on Saturday, 03.8.08 @ 17:56pm


Before i say what i have to say please know that LZ is my favorite band. OK. Jimmy Page in my eyes was one of the weeker links of zeppelin...for some strange reason when people think zeppelin they think Jimmy. This is BS, John Paul Jones was the musical jenious behind the whole deal and bonzo had the greatest touch in the world. Robert Plant in his earlier days could fricken blow your head up if he wanted to and had great range to boot. Jimmy? What did Jimmy do. i will give him the fact that he made up some great pentatonic riffs, and his rythem playing was top notch, but he does not deserve being called a rock god.

Posted by Tony on Tuesday, 03.11.08 @ 00:15am


Jimmy Page wrote all but a handful of Led Zeppelin's songs and produced all of their albums. Forget his rhythm playing, the man was an amazing soloist. He also had probably the most extensive knowledge of guitar and guitar-based music of any of his contemporaries. If anyone is a rock god, Jimmy Page definitely is.

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:07am


"If anyone is a rock god, Jimmy Page definitely is."

Still not the best.

I'll take the chance to remind everyone of his solo 'career'.

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:13am


Aw, come on. Be nice.

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:14am


There's really nothing to be nice about with Page's solo career.

I haven't actually listened to all of it, but I've heard the stuff that is considered 'best,' which is all mediocre at best.

My expectations for any new Led Zeppelin CD (they'll probably do it for the cash) are exceedingly low.

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:17am


His heart was never in his solo career. You can see from things he's said that he's always just wanted to play with Led Zeppelin. If there's anything left of the old magic, the new Led Zeppelin music should be pretty decent.

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:20am


That's one huge "if." Presence was really messy and that was only '76. This is 2008, so my expectations are low; as with pretty much every reunion, aside from The Verve's '97 reunion (their new reunion is a bit worrying; good live show, apparently, but the studio material might be sh*t if Ashcroft's solo is anything to go by).

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:28am


Then again, there's The Verve and then there's Led Zeppelin, if you catch my meaning.

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:41am


Richard Ashcroft is a far better singer than Robert Plant. Because he can actually sing.

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:44am


Don't tell me you intend to argue that Robert Plant can't sing. You may not like his voice, as I'm sure you don't, but the man can certainly sing. In fact, he has no problem with doing so and has even been rather successful with it. What's Richard Ashcroft doing these days? Waiting for "Bittersweet Symphony" to come on the radio so he can pick up his cheque?

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 11:50am


Plant is a horrible, horrible singer, just like all the hair metal spawns that tried to ape his wailing-cat vocals.

Richard is singing well these days, as always (better than Plant). He's actually my least favourite member of The Verve, by the way, and I believe that Nick McCabe is the real back bone of the band.

They don't get money from Bittersweet Symphony because it is a reverse of a Rolling Stones melody (can't remember which), and Allen Klein is a greedy piece of sh*t that wrongfully took a larger percentage of the profits than initially agreed upon (he took 100% when they had originally agreed on 50/50 either way).

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 12:02pm


"The Last Time" was the Stones song they stole for their sole hit. I take it you dislike falsetto singers. This would explain your hatred of Heart, Judas Priest, etc. So tell me, how do you like bass and baritone voices like Jim Morrison or Jimi Hendrix?

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 12:05pm


They didn't "steal" the song at all. They had an agreement with Allen Klein (a written one, even!) that the money would go 50/50. Then, when the song became a mega-hit world wide, Klein decided he work his magic and get 100%.

I don't dislike Judas Priest. I don't listen to them much, but I'd never claim to dislike them.

Jim Morrison is a god-like singer and frontman. I like some baritone, but some of them are absolutely horrendous; Ian Curits comes to mind.

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 12:27pm


You're right, sorry. Somebody else was going off on Judas Priest. I never heard the story about the agreement with Allen Klein. I just saw Keith Richards saying, "We're being ripped off." I agree about Jim Morrison. It is hard to find a singer with an agreeable range, especially if one is not fond of high notes.

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 12:36pm


Don't worry about it. Not many people know about the Klein case. In fact, hardly anyone knows about the link between the two songs. I don't think Keef would feel to bothered about it (he's a multi-millionaire).

Strangely, I am quite fond of singers like Mark E. Smith and Andy Gill, even if they cannot sing very well (the former cannot sing at all). I just like shronking, I guess (everyone can do it!).

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 12:45pm


Keith's a pretty sensitive chap, I guess.

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 12:49pm


Geoff Tate from Queensryche and Sebastion Bach from Skid Row can out sing just about anyone out there, especially back when they were younger.

Posted by Frankie C. on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 15:03pm


Yeah, man. I've seen both of them live (no really) and their voices overpower the instruments and all the din from the whole crowd. Those guys are incredible.

Posted by Metalsmith on Wednesday, 03.12.08 @ 15:21pm


I was a huge Zeppelin fan for many many years in my teens, and I was hugely inspired by Jimmys guitar work, but I have to agree with some of what Craig has posted about them stealing work from other lesser known artists and not giving them the writing credits in the album cover, nor did they pay for royalties to use these tracks that are obviously rip offs of other bands that they were influenced by.

People think that Pages acoustic work is untouchable, but listen to Bert Jansch's song Blackwaterside ( A traditional song), and hear that Page clearly ripped off this track from Bert, as it is almost identical, except Page's version has no lyrics whereas Bert's version does.

I have to say, that I much prefer Bert's version of this song now after hearing it, his acoustic playing is far better than anything Jimmy ever did.

I do still respect Page, as I can't deny that I was hugely influenced by him as a teen, but I don't have the same respect for him that I used to after becoming aware that a lot of what they wrote were obvious rip off's from other lesser known artists songs, now if they did the right thing and gave credit where credit was due, then I would still respect these guys, but for them to take all writing credits for these songs is unfair on the original artists, and still to this day there are tracks that still don't give the real artist's credit, only the folk who filed lawsuits against LZ for stealing their songs got given out of court settlements...

Posted by Dave on Saturday, 03.22.08 @ 11:58am


Jimmy Page.

The Harely Davidson of Guitarist's ..the magic the mystery..the experience of Zeppelin...the songs......however you put it or dismay...clearly Jiimy has been a part of Rock music and it's evolution.....all our ears listen to songs that have lasted a liftime.....Stairway to Heaven ring a bell ?....Just Like Beatles songs...Zepplin has withstood the times......I vote yes...wont here me listining to Depeche Mode in 50 years......

Posted by Wonkey on Sunday, 03.30.08 @ 09:02am


Never. He and his band were the most overrated in rock history. Ripoff artist, satan worshipper and child molester (see Lori Maddox).

Posted by JC on Thursday, 04.3.08 @ 11:38am


I for one love jimmy page and his work--agreed, his later solo material does not live up to expectations, and he has already been inducted in the rock and roll hall of fame twice [yardbirds and led zeppelin]. he is a sloppy player, but he's creative; he may have taken some material and not credited it properly, but it was stupid to do so--he has also already gotten a life time achievement award: no question that better guitarists do walk this earth who are neater and more technically appealing, but jimmy page is a "Guitar God," a rock ledgend and a guitarist you cannot ignore. however, i think someone else should shine and be inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame.

Posted by amelia on Sunday, 07.20.08 @ 21:11pm


Dameon...From everything I could gather (most of it guitar related), the vast majority of Page's interest in the occult had to do with either Crowley (that guy had some SERIOUS issues!!!) or old english folklore. He was also interested in astrology and how it tied in with the occult...pretty confusing stuff!!!

Ever notice how "Black Dog" is never mentioned in the song?

"A black dog is a spectral being found primarily in the folklores of the British Isles. The black dog is essentially a nocturnal spectre, often said to be associated with the Devil, and its appearance was regarded as a portent of death. It is generally supposed to be larger than a physical dog, and often has large, glowing eyes."

Kinda gives you the creeps, huh???

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 09.16.08 @ 19:44pm


Jimmy Page was a great guitarist up until drugs took over in the early 70's. From that point on he was pure slop and all myth. He has done nothing since Zep that you can call inspiring or crucial to the development of music as we know it today. He is the most overrated musician of all time and I get sick seeing his old gray face accepting award after award having to do witht he far far past. He does nothing today but live in the past. Robert laughs at hiom behind his back Im sure.

Posted by Michael TW on Wednesday, 10.8.08 @ 19:17pm


Michael TW...calling Jimmy Page "the most overrated musician of all time" is not right. You can argue that anybody is overrated one way or the other. However, it's your opinion, and just because it's your opinion doesn't make it so or make whatever you say the final statement.

That being said, I say the most overrated musician is Paul McCartney. There's someone who didn't deserve a solo induction.

Posted by Jesus on Wednesday, 10.8.08 @ 22:36pm


Page and Plant are like the old Manny and Big Papi combination. Not like the Axl and Slash Combination (thats like drugs mixed with alchohal). If Page goes so will Plant.

Posted by Mike on Friday, 10.10.08 @ 15:21pm


Hey Jesus, I just left a similar comment on the Paul McCartney page

Good to know Jesus is on my side!!

Posted by Mr. Octagon on Friday, 10.10.08 @ 18:03pm


Mr. Octagon... Of course Jesus would be on your side against The Beatles. After all, up until the 90's they had the dumbest comment of all time award with the statement "we're bigger than Jesus"

Posted by Keebord on Friday, 10.10.08 @ 18:06pm


JESUS IS ON MY SIDE TOO (spirtuly).

Posted by Mike on Saturday, 10.11.08 @ 17:03pm


This discussion is like so many others I've read. People annoyed by the love so many have for Zep and Page, never really take a close listen. Instead they resort to bashing.

Or for whatever reason, Pages' style just doesn't appeal to them. Admittedly, I haven't heard many guitarists other than those already considered to be among the best fifty or so rock guitarists. For me, Page is a significant cut above all but a couple of these guys - an extremely gifted player capable of many different styles. The vast majority of his work, he did not rip off (although in a few cases he did and should be held to account.)

To me, Zep I is arguably the greatest guitar album ever recodered when considering strictly playing (excluding songwriting.) How anyone could call him an average or below average lead guitarist is beyond comprehension.

His solo studio work consists of one album. The others were as a part of The Firm or the collaberation with David Coverdale. There is some good work on these albums and once you get over the dispointment that it isn't Zeppelin, some of it is pretty enjoyable.

Despite what I've said here, his solo and studio hire works don't get him in - far from it. But to have a discussion of the greatest rock guitarist (even indirectly) and not give him his due is self-centered and ridiculous. Just because you don't hear it, doesn't mean others won't (in this case hundreds of millions of others).



Posted by James on Monday, 10.20.08 @ 20:06pm


John Bonham can't go into the rock hall solo, right? I think he was only with Led Zeppelin and some band with Robert Plant.

Posted by Mike on Tuesday, 11.11.08 @ 13:02pm


He was the lead guitarist for one of the greatest bands ever, but as a solo artist he doesn't rate a spot in the hall.

Posted by Timothy Horrigan on Wednesday, 11.12.08 @ 18:23pm


Timothy Horrigan-


Yes, he was not all great as a solo artist but (I always say this) but compared to Madonna. Why would Tom Petty go in as a solo artist ethier.

Posted by Mike on Wednesday, 12.24.08 @ 18:08pm


Stairway to Heaven is the greatest song in rock and roll history. It is the greatest solo. Heartbreaker is impossible during the solo. How about some of you who are ripping on Page try to play it. Whole lotta love is one of the most influential songs in rock and roll. Achilles Last Stand is extremely difficult as well. Not to mention he could play acoustically! Over the Hills and Far Away is a great intro. Led Zeppelin III has some great acoustic tunes. I don't really care too much if he gets inducted as a solo artist, but he is one of the greatest guitarists of all time.

Posted by Zosofan on Friday, 01.2.09 @ 13:38pm


cause we know that is english

Posted by Sauce on Tuesday, 01.20.09 @ 18:41pm


I have to say no for his solo work. He is in twice and his solo work really has no influence or innovation.

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 14:19pm


It wouldn't necessarily be because of his solo work, but...like Jeff Beck...he's one of the most influential rock guitarists ever (not that I've ever been that crazy about him, but I wouldn't deny that fact), and no other instument comes close to symbolizing rock music like the guitar...

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 19:21pm


Being completely honest I don't agree with Beck's solo induction. Yes, he is a very influencial player, but can anyone name anything from his solo work?

Page is a great musician. He's done it all from blues rock, acoustic music, and he is one of the pioneers of heavy metal, yet I see no reason to put him in for his solo material. He's in twice and I think that's enough.

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 20:26pm


It's not being a solo ARTIST...it's simply because of who he is and what he does. It would be because of his contribution to ROCK GUITAR!!! Beck doesn't exactly knock everyone's socks off with his solo work...but that's not why he was inducted. They're both among the most influential and innovative guitarists ever...period.

In terms of contribution to rock music, artists like them are above being on the "hit parade".

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 21:41pm


If you are inducting the man by himself into the performers category than it should stand for his solo not just for a contribution outside his solo work. We can't just induct Mick Jagger as a lone artist just because he influenced tons of frontmen outside of his solo work.

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 21:48pm


Jagger is known primarily for being lead singer for the Stones...Page is a key reason that TWO legendary bands (one remembered more for their guitar players than anything else...probably the main reason they were inducted) are in the HoF and a successful session player to boot.

Not such a good comparison...

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 23:38pm


"Being completely honest I don't agree with Beck's solo induction. Yes, he is a very influencial player, but can anyone name anything from his solo work?"

Beck's Bolero
Goodbye Porkpie Hat
Plynth (Water Down The Drain)
Hi-Ho Silver Lining
Ambitious
Greensleeves

When Jeff Beck was inducted solo, they pretty much included everything Jeff Beck Group, too, so all of the above count, imo. Same as they did with Patti Smith. Technically, most of her famous work was "the Patti Smith Group".

I gotta agree with Dude Man about Jimmy Page though. I'm not really familiar with his solo work that much either. His work was mostly for his two groups (and one was really inducted more because it was a proving ground that for the actual music they made, good though it is). If we're talking session work, that's what Side-Man is for.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 07.18.09 @ 00:39am


Okay...for just a second let's forget the idiotic categories and use another example because I don't think you know where I'm coming from;

In the last 30 years or so, has there been a musician whose had more impact or influence on rock music than Eddie Van Halen? But because he hasn't done any solo work or his most notable side project is "Beat It", he can't be singled out and is limited to induction with his band (who wouldn't be in the HoF without him). That concept is totally ridiculous.

The thing that everyone remembers about the Yardbirds is the guitar players...the casual music fan would be hard-pressed to name any other member of that group. In a lot of groups you have a backbeat (bass & drums), a "clown" (aka lead singer, who have disrupted more than their fair share of great bands) , and the lead guitar player...who is usually the heart & soul of the group. I'm totally aware that giving instrumenalists recognition isn't going to happen, but it just shows another flaw in the system. There are times when a band is nothing without a key ingredient, and that ingredient usually is the lead guitar player...it certainly isn't the lead singer (in most cases)...

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 07.19.09 @ 09:16am


Yep, they're definitely similar. The chord progressions to "The Needle & The Damage Done" and "Dear Prudence" are similar, then there was the Coldplay sounds like Joe Satriani sounds like Marty Balin's "Hearts" thing here recently. It seems like even the best artists have a little larceny in them....

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 07.19.09 @ 12:04pm


Jimmy Page is to guitar development as snow is to mountains

Posted by michael on Monday, 09.7.09 @ 18:57pm


This cat can PLAY

Posted by mrxyz on Tuesday, 09.22.09 @ 23:26pm


This Metalsmith dude is dick riding all over Jimmy Page.

Posted by Steven Vai on Saturday, 01.9.10 @ 01:37am


Jimmy might be overrated, but only a little. Don't bring the "Stairway to Heaven"/Spirit comparisons into this; Zep opened for Spirit, the song was really popular, and if Spirit wanted to sue for plagiarism they could've (and would've won) but they didn't, so therefore I like to think of it as a tribute. I am aware of him and Plant stealing guitar parts and bits of lyrics from old blues artists and not crediting them; these artists finally got their act together in the 80's, took them to court, and won or got out of court settlements and got writing credits from thereafter (and rightfully so.) As for the person who mentioned Truth, I have it, and it is a great album. I'm sure it did somewhat inspire Zep's direction, as Page played on the original recording of "Beck's Bolero", but I don't hear any clear rip-offs in the first two albums. I'm not really aware of his post-Zeppelin work: I listened to one track from the Jimmy Page and Robert Plant project, which was okay, that "Radioactive" song from The Firm, which was dissapointingly boring, and I haven't listened to Coverdale/Page. I didn't even know he had any solo albums under his name, so I'm going to prematurely say no, as I don't know of anyone being influenced by his solo career. However, I know that before the Yardbirds he was a very in-demand session musician, as I know he played on The Who's "I Can't Explain" and apparently appeared on the Kinks first album. Is he worthy of being inducted as a Sideman? What do you guys think?

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 02.17.10 @ 17:45pm


Like Clapton and Beck he should be IN

Posted by mrxyz on Thursday, 02.18.10 @ 10:24am


With out a doubt YES

Posted by mrxyz on Saturday, 02.27.10 @ 23:38pm


Never. He and his band were the most overrated in rock history. Ripoff artist, satan worshipper and child molester (see Lori Maddox).

Posted by JC on Thursday, 04.3.08 @ 11:38am

Okay... things more overrated than Led Zeppelin:

-Guns 'n' Roses
-Nirvana
-80's era Aerosmith (70's certainly not)
-Any radio songs from The Grateful Dead
-Pet Sounds
-Green Day

I am aware of his plagiarism, and he deserves to be vilified for that. And he does have a shady history with women, including Lori Maddox. However, Satan has influenced lots of great music, so don't put him down for that. A lot of his lead work once the heroin kicked in was boring, and the one song I heard from The Firm was a huge dissapointment, and the only induction he could possibly deserve outside of Zeppelin would be as a sideman. However, not giving him his due at all is ridiculous.

Posted by Sam on Saturday, 04.24.10 @ 11:32am


And here's what JC was referring to:

http://www.stryder.de/rest/Groupie_Central_Lori_%20Maddox.html

Credit is due to Plant for not going on with a reunion. He knows he can't hit the high notes he used to, so to go out there and put on a half-assed performance would tarnish their legacy. I think they could've carried on without Bonham, however.

Posted by Sam on Saturday, 04.24.10 @ 11:35am


I left a post a couple years back saying Page should not get in as a solo artist. Upon reconsidering, I'm not so sure. You have to consider all that he did as a studio session guitarist in addition to the solo work (and the work he's done with other bands) over the years since Zeppelin. I mean if you are going to include Clapton and Beck as solo artists than you should include Page as well. When you look at Beck's jazz fusion albums there were other musicians recording the music as well (aka a band), and if I'm not mistaken Beck didn't actually write too many of the songs. Clapton has lots of great stuff with other bands, but his true solo stuff (other than From The Cradle - and how much of that is original material?) is pretty weak in comparison.

Page has not achieved greatness often since leaving Zep, but he has put reached it a few times (in addition to putting out a lot of good stuff). For example, The Firm's second album is worth the $16 price tag just for the solo in Live in Peace. It's that good. I would put it above all but just a few of the blues/rock solos of the 80's. He put out another great solo on Outrider -Emerald Eyes - passionate, almost tortured. To me, these were his two high points (in the studio) and sadly, they illustrate that the man still had it. It's a travesty that Page wasn't able to get with a band that inspired him more, but I'm sure some will argue he should have been able to do more of it drawing from his own inspiration.

A few other collabrations worth mentioning: 1)Page and Roy Harper on at least two albums. I haven't heard them, but I've read there is some good work. 2)Page's work with Plant on a couple different albums. The songs Please Read The Letter and Wonderful One are beautiful songs and No Quarter is a very good live album. 3)The double Live Album with The Black Crowes is excellent. Page was his usual live self: spontaneous, surprising, a bit sloppy, and above all brilliant. There are other projects and collaberations he's done since leaving Zep and there is some notable stuff on all of them, even though they don't get a ton of ink.

In closing, I recently aquired the Yardbirds Live album with Page. The sound quality isn't great, but Page certainly is. It is really interesting hearing him jam away on pre Zep material. It's pretty obvious why two of the founding members of the band are on record as saying The Yardbirds may have been at their best with Jimmy on lead. That's not a knock on Beck or Clapton (I love them both). I'm just saying that if you like Page you need to have this Album.








Posted by james on Wednesday, 06.30.10 @ 18:31pm


Page was great before ZEP.. and still is..I am sure at this point he really does not careto much what the "HALL" thinks but I could be wrong.

Posted by mrxyz on Thursday, 07.1.10 @ 06:19am


Jimi Hendrix is racist scumbag and sloppy . Clapton is beyond overated,and Beck songs are crap.I can tell you this. There a hundreds of better players then these three douchebags.

Posted by Nicky10lbs on Tuesday, 06.7.11 @ 20:17pm


Any proof that Hendrix was either racist or a twat, or more unsubstantited hearsay? I'd love to know these "hundreds" better than Beck and Hendrix, but I probably won't get an answer.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 06.17.11 @ 08:34am


Not solo. His induction's with Yardbirds and Zeppelin are enough.

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 07.30.11 @ 12:16pm


Jimi Hendrix Sucks Page Sucks Clapton Sucks . Do you really defend these douchebags . What are you still 13 years old in 1972.

Posted by Sam. on Saturday, 06.2.12 @ 13:20pm


I'm not Nicky10lbs., but I can name quite a few guitarists who are superior to the terribly overrated triumvirate of Hendrix (I still like some of his material, but a lot of his solos are too screechy and distorted-sounding for my tastes), Clapton (second-rate attempts at attempting to adapt blues guitar riffs to rock 'n' roll) and Page (Ditto, although he raped the blues even worse than Clapton):

Chuck Berry
David Gilmour
Bo Diddley
Eddie Cochran
Brian May
John Deacon
Eddie Van Halen
Jeff "Skunk" Baxter
Elliot Easton
Glenn Tipton
K.K. Downing
Mick Ronson
Neil Giraldo

I can go on and on, but I'm really tired of people forming their opinions on favorite guitarists based on looking at Rolling Stone's inflated lists. Why do so many people take the easy way out and namedrop critical darlings instead of forming their own opinions?

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 08.5.12 @ 20:25pm


You kiddin? Chuck berry? Mr "Re use a riff for like 4 songs" Berry? Hendrix's playing is far superior.

In regards to Clapton, while his stuff in cream was pretty meh, give a listen to Layla or Bluesbreakers if you haven't already. His melding of blues and rock... actually works.

Posted by GFW on Monday, 08.6.12 @ 08:13am


Chuck Berry is of course, a genius. One of the few people who can legitimate claim the title of "Father of Rock and Roll." If he didn't come on the scene, rock and roll would have sounded completely different.

That being said, as a guitarist, he really wasn't among the top say, 10 guitarists in the world. GFW said: "reuse a riff for like 4 songs" replace 4 with 10 and you sort of get the picture, just ask any more serious guitarist. As a "Father of Rock and Roll" however, he is almost certainly unmatched.

Clapton is of course, overrated to an extent. Nevertheless, being near the top of your league and being respected/ well-known for it tends to lead to being overrated. If he didn't do such a great job, er, "borrowing" the sound of the blues for rock, rock music in the 70's could have sounded vastly different (Not saying he's single-handedly responsible, but he was amongst the group of individuals responsible).

The "overratedness" (that's not a word, is it?) I described for Clapton applies to Hendrix as well. Still, one can't really make a legitimate argument that his reputation is wholly undeserving.

As for Rolling Stones inflated lists, I actually don't know any serious music fan who takes their awful, audacious lists seriously.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 08.6.12 @ 08:35am


Zach, I read your post and was thinking to myself, "this sounds like..." and then got to the bottom and saw "Posted by Zach." And I thought, of course it is. Not even addressing your ridiculous statements about Hendrix, Clapton (and believe me, I am a huge critic of Clapton for many reasons, but as a guitar player myself I can tell you that his name does end up where it does on these lists for damn good reasons) and Page. I will say that your list lacks credibility for the simple reason that it omits Jeff Beck. Or was that a typo?

And I agree that you should take Rolling Stone lists with an entire shaker of salt, but if you look at the end of the issue where they list the panel/voters, the vast majority of them are other guitarists. From Trey Anastasio, James Burton, Elliot Easton, Dave Davies to Alex Lifeson, J Mascis, Brian May, Dave Mustaine and Scotty Moore...maybe these guys know a thing or two about great guitar playing.

Posted by Dezmond on Monday, 08.6.12 @ 10:42am


but I can name quite a few guitarists who are superior to the terribly overrated triumvirate of Hendrix (I still like some of his material, but a lot of his solos are too screechy and distorted-sounding for my tastes), Clapton (second-rate attempts at attempting to adapt blues guitar riffs to rock 'n' roll) and Page (Ditto, although he raped the blues even worse than Clapton):

Chuck Berry
David Gilmour
Bo Diddley
Eddie Cochran
Brian May
John Deacon
Eddie Van Halen
Jeff "Skunk" Baxter
Elliot Easton
Glenn Tipton
K.K. Downing
Mick Ronson
Neil Giraldo

I can go on and on, but I'm really tired of people forming their opinions on favorite guitarists based on looking at Rolling Stone's inflated lists. Why do so many people take the easy way out and namedrop critical darlings instead of forming their own opinions?

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 08.5.12 @ 20:25pm
--------------------------------------------------
So basically what you're saying is, you like a mixture of early rockabilly & smoother, poppier tones in your guitar work ( I won't ask how you got Glenn Tipton & K.K. Downing in that mix). At the same time you seem to dislike anything where the colorings are fuzzed, distorted, or shaded differently. I will say that the H/C/P combo would've been foolish to not consider working with all the newfangled guitar effects of their day, rather than trying to stick to a late 50's/early 60's guitar toning & phrasing.

One oher question: throing out any 60's rhetoric, what do you think about Robbie Krieger of the Doors? His guitar style is reminiscent of the tones you'd seem to like, though he's a part of that nasty old 60's decade :) Just asking...

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 08.6.12 @ 11:56am


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t40INnb6DnY

"you seem to dislike anything where the colorings are fuzzed, distorted, or shaded differently"

If that's true than Zach sure isn't going to like this! ^

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 08.6.12 @ 12:18pm


Just wait till he discovers shoegaze!

Posted by GFW on Monday, 08.6.12 @ 12:58pm


My eyes are drifting so I really don't have time to respond to everyone's retorts yet. However, I would to address a few comments made by Cheesecrop.

In regards to my guitar preferences, you are correct in your statement that I enjoy rockabilly guitar riffs. After all, rockabilly is one of my favorite genres of music.

However, it would be a grave mistake on all our parts to not acknowledge great guitarists in other genres. For jazz, I'm partial to Charlie Christian and George Benson. For blues, I love T-Bone Walker, B.B King, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Hubert Sumlin. Country, my favorites are Hank Williams, Don Helms, Willie Nelson, Hank Snow, and Jerry Reed. And that's only a sampling of guitarists in other genres whom I like. After all, discussions on great/favorite guitarists should not be limited to just rock 'n' roll.

As for The Doors, I do enjoy them a lot. Robbie Krieger's style is fine in my book; it's distorted enough that it gives the songs that extra oomph, but not so much that it drowns out Jim Morrison's vocals, Ray Manzarek's keyboards, and John Densmore's drumming. They're easily my favorite band of the 1960s, although Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd, and The Zombies come pretty close!

Lastly, I don't know what gives you the impression that I hate the entire decade of the 1960s in terms of music. I enjoy a lot of the surf, MoTown, soul, British Invasion, baroque pop, girl groups, and even some bubblegum pop from that decade. It's dreck like Phil Ochs, Janis Joplin, and Jefferson Airplane that I loathe. I'd rather be tied to a chair in a room and have the speakers blast Pat Boone or Lawrence Welk 24/7 than suffer through that godawful hippie garbage. We can thank The Velvet Underground Alice Cooper, and especially David Bowie for sending that dross back to the stone age.

I'll get around to Tahvo's, GFW's and Dezmond's replies later.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 08.6.12 @ 23:46pm


My comment wasn't meant as a retort, Zach ;)

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 08.7.12 @ 04:10am


wait, what's wrong with Janis? Her music's fairly blues based, unless her stuf with the band she was in beforehand was psychedelic.

Posted by GFW on Tuesday, 08.7.12 @ 06:50am


Like I said, Tahvo, my eyes were drifting as I typed up my first response. I apologize for using the wrong terminology. Everything's cool between us, as our previous conversations will attest.

I totally agree that Chuck Berry is far from being the greatest guitarist ever. I also agree that some of his material suffers from reusing guitar riffs and chord progressions from earlier songs (see Run Rudolph Run/Little Queenie, School Day/No Particular Place to Go, etc.). Even among 1950s guitarists, Berry wouldn't rank as my favorite. That honor would go to either Bo Diddley or Eddie Cochran, both of whom did far more innovative things with the guitar than Berry.

Berry's main achievement with the guitar was that he made it the centerpiece instrument for rock 'n' roll music. Before Berry established the electric guitar as the main instrument in rock 'n' roll, pianos and horns were at the forefront, as evidenced by Fats Domino and Bill Haley & His Comets. If Chuck Berry had chosen hairdressing as his calling card in life and not music, chances are we'd be debating the greatest piano players or horn players in rock 'n' roll, not guitar players. Not that that would necessarily be a bad thing, as do enjoy the sounds of horns and pianos, but rock 'n' roll would be a very different animal if Chuck Berry had not made the guitar solo the showcase of rock 'n' roll.

Personally, I think Berry's greatest strengths are in his smooth, clear vocals and clever songwriting. Whether it's the emphasis on the word it in Little Queenie's fifth verse or how he subtly uses brown-eyed as a metaphor for brown-skinned in Brown-Eyed Handsome Man, Berry has always demonstrated a flair for creative songwriting.

I wasn't trying to dispute the H/C/P trio's reputation in rock 'n' roll. I was attempting to show that there's plenty of room at the top for other equally talented guitarists to join them. I don't think it's inane or impossible to suggest that there are guitarists, rock 'n' roll or otherwise, who are on the same plane as or even on a higher plane than the H/C/P trio. Personally, I think Brian May is the greatest guitarist because of his ability to match the sound of the guitar to Freddie Mercury's vocals and how May and John Deacon both seamlessly blend their guitars as though they were one. That's just my own take on the subject.

I just get tired of hearing and seeing so many people take the easy way out on "best of" lists and depend on the most popular names to occupy their lists. I don't doubt that there are individuals who pick Hendrix, Page, Beck, Clapton et al for genuine reasons, but after a while, I get sick of seeing the usual suspects crop up. After reading so many of these cliched lists, I almost get the impression that these list creators are only aware of the big names.

Posted by Zach on Friday, 08.10.12 @ 19:44pm


Thanks for going into so much detail, Zach. And I agree with pretty much everything you said.

"After reading so many of these cliched lists, I almost get the impression that these list creators are only aware of the big names."

I wouldn't be surprised if that were true, actually.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Saturday, 08.11.12 @ 14:13pm


Zach, I read your post and was thinking to myself, "this sounds like..." and then got to the bottom and saw "Posted by Zach." And I thought, of course it is. Not even addressing your ridiculous statements about Hendrix, Clapton (and believe me, I am a huge critic of Clapton for many reasons, but as a guitar player myself I can tell you that his name does end up where it does on these lists for damn good reasons) and Page. I will say that your list lacks credibility for the simple reason that it omits Jeff Beck. Or was that a typo?

Posted by Dezmond on Monday, 08.6.12 @ 10:42am

Ow, Dezmond, it appears that you suffer from what I call the Parrot Syndrome. It works like this: A handful of critics dub a work of art or an individual as a masterpiece or the greatest in their field. These self-appointed guardians of taste treat this opinion as if it is a fact. Some may genuinely like whatever is being critically hailed, but there's usually a horde of copycats who usually regurgitate the same mantra that the experts have already stated. These types treat any dissenting opinions as being wrong (How can opinions even be right or wrong in the first place?) or sacrilegious.

You have demonstrated this by your questioning why I didn't rank Jeff Beck. The reason is simple: He raped the blues the same way that Clapton and Page did.

A list is merely an expression of one's personal tastes. Taking umbrage at my snubbing Beck is pointless because (A) It's my list, (B) I'm ranking the guitarists whom I like, and (C) I'm not going to automatically put someone on my favorite/greatest list just because it's popular to do so. It wouldn't be genuine if I forced myself to put a guitarist whom I don't like on my favorite/greatest guitarists list.

Should everyone who writes a favorite/greatest movies list automatically put Citizen Kane* on it? Should everyone who writes a favorite/greatest novels list automatically put The Great Gatsby on it? No, because not everyone likes the same things. That's why we have these beautiful expressions known as opinions. It'd be a pretty boring world if the only guitarists we talked about were Page, Clapton, Beck, and Hendrix.

*I personally loathe Citizen Kane because the characters are so cold and unrelatable, not to mention the acting is as stiff as a board. If I made a list of my favorite/greatest movies, I'd probably start with Creature from the Black Lagoon, Gremlins, Duck Soup, Better Off Dead, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Napoleon Dynamite, Mothra vs. Godzilla/Godzilla vs. the Thing, Planes Trains and Automobiles, Ghidorah the Three-Headed Monster, and The Thing (1982 remake) in my top 10 (Not exactly in that order, though).

Posted by Zach on Tuesday, 09.11.12 @ 20:00pm


Now here is one talent person A true blues master with real feel.. among other guitar works,,

Posted by Happy on Tuesday, 09.11.12 @ 21:52pm


Now here is one talent person A true blues master with real feel.. among other guitar works,,

Posted by Happy on Tuesday, 09.11.12 @ 21:52pm


No Gojira (the japanese, not the american version which unessecarily adds Raymond Burr)

Posted by GFW on Wednesday, 09.12.12 @ 10:59am


By the way, Tahvo, I finally checked out that video from YouTube that you linked. Simply atrocious. I knew nothing of Frijid Pink before watching that performance, but if the rest of their oeuvre is anything like that screechy cover of House of the Rising Sun, then I'll pass.

The main problem I have with many of the rock 'n roll guitarists that emerged in that era is that they abused distortion and other effects to such an absurd degree. That era pretty much gave rise to the rockist "guitars or nothing" mentality that continues to permeate casual and critical circles alike. That's just one reason why I get on my soapbox about people not showing any respect for pre-1960s music. There is no justifiable reason to ignore the first six decades of the 20th century and focus only on what happened between 1965-1976 (give or take a couple years), inclusive.

Are you familiar with Charlie Christian? Now there's a guitarist truly worthy of all the adulation that Jimmy Page and his distorted brethren receive. Since Christian worked mainly in jazz, I suppose that some reading this post will foolishly ignore him, but I'm sure you're open-minded enough to give him a chance (that is, if you're not already acquainted with his catalog).

Now here's what a truly skilled guitarist sounds like!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ce9Jtl9D6FQ

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 04.25.13 @ 01:01am


The main problem I have with many of the rock 'n roll guitarists that emerged in that era is that they abused distortion and other effects to such an absurd degree. That era pretty much gave rise to the rockist "guitars or nothing" mentality that continues to permeate casual and critical circles alike. That's just one reason why I get on my soapbox about people not showing any respect for pre-1960s music. There is no justifiable reason to ignore the first six decades of the 20th century and focus only on what happened between 1965-1976 (give or take a couple years), inclusive.

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 04.25.13 @ 01:01am
--------------------------------------------------
You're forgetting that a lot of those early rock guitarists readily messed around w/primitive effects, or attempted to achieve them. Link Wray was trying distortion out, Dick Dale was an early techie of sorts, & the Rock & Roll Trio tried out some sort of primitive distortion on their early records.

Why turn around & stifle an attempt to move forward w/ the instrument?

In addition, no one's really ignoring the period 1900-1960. It's just that a great deal of the audience for the music is not here any longer. You probably cannot remember the days when there Was, in fact, stations that catered to this music. Growing up in Philadelphia in the 1980's & 90's, we had station 950 (WPEN) which billed itself as "the Station of the Stars". All Big Bands, pop vocalists, some jazz, & practically no concessions to rock, outside of Elvis ballads, & maybe one or two Beatle ballads.

This station is now a sports-talk station.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Thursday, 04.25.13 @ 08:54am


"You're forgetting that a lot of those early rock guitarists readily messed around w/primitive effects, or attempted to achieve them. Link Wray was trying distortion out, Dick Dale was an early techie of sorts, & the Rock & Roll Trio tried out some sort of primitive distortion on their early records."

C'mon Cheesecrop, you know me better than that! I haven't forgotten anything. I'm one of the biggest advocates for Link Wray's entrance into the Hall. Ditto for Dick Dale and Johnny Burnette and the Rock 'n Roll Trio. I'm well aware of their experimentation with guitar distortion and other effects.

"Why turn around & stifle an attempt to move forward w/ the instrument?"

Is this supposed to be your interpretation of my missives directed at Jimmy Page and his contemporaries? If so, then I'm afraid you're putting words into my mouth. I never said I was against guitar distortion or experimentation in general. I enjoy the work of Link Wray and his Ray Men very much. I prefer Link to the overblown late 1960s pack because his guitar never sounded as obnoxious or overblown as what Page did (Kashmir is the worst offender, and that's saying a lot considering how many other LZ songs feature earache-inducing solos from the torn page).

Wray came about at a time when guitar distortion and similar effects were not commonplace in rock 'n roll. It holds up better because distortion was still a neat gimmick at that time. As soon as the late 1960s arrived, it almost became imperative for nearly every rock 'n roll band to showcase overly distorted guitar playing. With a few exceptions, this is why I've never been a serious fan of metal.

"In addition, no one's really ignoring the period 1900-1960. It's just that a great deal of the audience for the music is not here any longer. You probably cannot remember the days when there Was, in fact, stations that catered to this music."

By the time I started listening to oldies stations (I was roughly about six years old), the 1950s were still well represented. The top station in my area, WODS 103.3, began to phase out the 1950s around 2001 or so and by 2004, all traces of that great decade were gone. They got bought out last summer and were turned into a generic top 40/R&B/pop station. I consider it karma for abandoning the 1950s.

So the dearth of the original audience is reason enough for music from the 1900-1960 to be shafted? By that logic, we shouldn't bother watching classic Hollywood films from the silent era up through the 1950s anymore because most of the people who saw them when they were new are dead.

Why stop there, though? William Shakespeare has been dead for nearly 400 years, and his original audience has been long gone. What's the point in theatres

Do you get my point? Just because most of the original audiences for rockabilly, swing, blues, and other pre-1960s forms of music are gone, doesn't mean we should pretend that those developments in music never happened and that everything started with The Beatles (as many ignorant folks already do).

Commercial FM radio is a wasteland. YouTube, online radio stations, and other digital outlets are preferable for discovering/re-discovering the greats from the first six decades of the 20th century. The tools are there, it's time for the millennials for start using them properly so they can learn about the trailblazers (Nat King Cole, Hank Williams Sr., Louis Jordan, Benny Goodman, Charlie Christian, Bill Monroe, Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie, and Buddy Holly for starters) and possibly appreciate them.

I don't expect everyone to have the passion I do for music from the 1900-1960 timeframe, but people who call themselves serious music fans should be familiar with the giants of rockabilly, swing, jump blues, doo wop, bebop, western swing, and other pre-1960s forms of music.

And that's why I always say...

GIVE ME MORE OF THE PAST SO THAT I CAN ENJOY THE PRESENT!

I wish I could take credit for the above motto, but that honor goes to George Schire, a poster on Kayfabe Memories (a vintage wrestling message board). He used to have that line in his signature but removed it. He still breaks it out once in a while.

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 04.25.13 @ 15:12pm


So the dearth of the original audience is reason enough for music from the 1900-1960 to be shafted? By that logic, we shouldn't bother watching classic Hollywood films from the silent era up through the 1950s anymore because most of the people who saw them when they were new are dead.

Why stop there, though? William Shakespeare has been dead for nearly 400 years, and his original audience has been long gone. What's the point in theatres

Do you get my point? Just because most of the original audiences for rockabilly, swing, blues, and other pre-1960s forms of music are gone, doesn't mean we should pretend that those developments in music never happened and that everything started with The Beatles (as many ignorant folks already do).

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 04.25.13 @ 15:12pm
--------------------------------------------------
I do think you know what I'm getting at. I do in fact agree that even the Oldies stations have done a disservice in dropping the 50's from the fold. In Philly, one of the major oldies stations, 98.1 WOGL dropped the 50's back in the mid-2000's. Instead of 50's-70's, it's now 60's through 80's, but w/no really good 80's music, as I see it (lots of ballads that weren't so hot the first time round).

In the case of music vs. movies/theaters, I was referring to straight commercial media. Obviously those will be fully market-driven, so they'll cater to those w/the disposable income - that being younger folks.

I agree that the tools are there, but those same tools tend to individualize the audience. You can put out the clarion call, but these days you've got to hope everyone's on the same wavelength at the same time, & that doesn't always happen that much.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Thursday, 04.25.13 @ 15:32pm


Leave your comment:

Name:

Email:

Comments:


Security Question:

Which letter is Springsteen's band named after?
 

Note: Emails will not be visible or used in any way, but are required. Please keep comments relevant to the topic. Any content deemed inappropriate or offensive may be edited and/or deleted.

No HTML code is allowed.




This site is not affiliated with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.