The Small Faces/The Faces

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer

Category: Performer

Inducted in: 2012

Inducted by: Stevie Van Zandt

Nominated in: 2012

First Eligible: 1992 Ceremony

Inducted Members: Ronnie Lane, Steve Marriott, Ian McLagan, Kenney Jones, Ron Wood, Rod Stewart


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Ogden's Nut Gone Flake (1968)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Itchycoo Park (1967)
Ogdens' Nut Gone Flake (1968)
Stay With Me (1971)
Ooh La La (1973)

The Small Faces/The Faces @ Wikipedia

The Small Faces/The Faces Videos

Comments

234 comments so far (post your own)

This band will never get the recognition they deserve. It is with this band that the Black Crowes and London Quireboys learned about garage r & b; not the Stones. It is too bad Rod got too big for his spandex. This is a great band.

Posted by Dameon on Saturday, 11.24.07 @ 16:59pm


The Faces have been considered but NOT the Small Faces?? This makes absolutely no sense whatsoever considering the criteria above.

Consider Steve Marriott's vocals, the songwriting, the brilliance of Ogden's Nut Gone Flake...and their influence on British pop culture in the 60s...and beyond...

Perhaps the Hall of Fame should consider renaming themselves the AMERICAN Rock and Roll Hall of Fame because it appears US chart success is the only real criteria used.

Posted by Laura on Tuesday, 04.1.08 @ 04:10am


The Small Faces are one of the best British invasion bands most Americans have never heard. Either that or they know Itchycoo Park, which is a great song but does not paint an accurate picture of what this band had to offer.

Steve Mariott commanded your attention from the satge with his big white Gretch guitar, even bigger voice and diminuative stature. Find the videos on YouTube from a black & white German TV show and you'll see what I'm talking about.

Posted by popguru on Monday, 06.23.08 @ 21:46pm


Whoever comments on the small faces and needs to put them down really pi**es me of and they obviously where not there at the time.I was and they where fantastic and the music industry is sadder without Ronnie Lane and Steve marriott.I tried and failed,they did and succeeded, and all the bands today owe there music history to these guys,even if the concieted sods don't admit it,all the so called critics should try and stand there in front of an audience and entertain them and most of them are talentless sods,it was the best era,we had the best bands all around London,North,South,East,Or West and i am better for the experience,God bless them all and especially those that are not with us anymoreTel Strange,Herne Bay,Kent.

Posted by terry strange on Friday, 10.17.08 @ 12:03pm


Believe me, The Small Faces did not go un-noticed here in the Land of Oz (NYC). They were simply, great!

Posted by Dameon on Friday, 10.17.08 @ 14:36pm


Come on, these guys not only influenced dozens of sloppy but sharp bar bands, but they invented the "party room", for God's sake! You know, the extra hotel room rented to have a place for the party and not use someone's room. How many other bands have these guys played in? Hm...Woody in the Stones, Jones in the Who, McLagan with the Stones and on countless albums as a session player, not to mention the Bump Band? Ronnie Lane? Rod... before the big sell-out???

Posted by Allan on Wednesday, 12.3.08 @ 22:13pm


It makes no sense whatsoever to me that the Small Faces aren't in the Hall. They were an amazing band and had a big impact on the course of rock history. And Steve Marriott - Lordy! If you don't know them well, Youtube them, my friends. You won't be sorry.

Posted by Padraig on Friday, 02.13.09 @ 20:20pm


Can anyone name a band more worthy than the Small Faces that has been overlooked for as long as they have? They were just extraordinary. I agree with the first comment about the "American Rock and Roll Hall of Fame". They didn't sell big in the US, so they are dismissed as unworthy while the Dave Clark Five, a band with less than one tenth of talent of the Small Faces, just sails right in. It isn't right.

Posted by Mickey on Saturday, 04.18.09 @ 09:11am


No to the Small Faces. I'm not familiar with the influence that had across the pond, so if someone would fill me in there, that'd be nice. But "Itchycoo Park" is one of the more annoying records of the British Invasion. I own an anthology on Small Faces, and overall, I thought it was pretty forgettable stuff.

Honestly, I don't think anyone would care a whole lot about the Small Faces if it hadn't been for it's later incarnation of Faces, which possibly no one would have remembered but for Rod Stewart's success afterwards. (Though the Faces stuff, I thought, was pretty good.)

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 04.18.09 @ 09:29am


So you think All or Nothing, The Universal, Afterglow of Your Love, the SF's amazing covers of Tim Hardin's tunes and their concept album Ogden's Nut Gone Flake, to name just a few, are "pretty forgettable"?

Have you ever checked out the colour version of Tin Soldier on youtube? Not impressed? (and they're lip synching! Imagine them live, if you can.)

As far as who they had a strong influence on - bands as diverse as Led Zeppelin, (Robert Plant has blatantly tried to imitate Steve Marriott's vocals his entire career) the Sex Pistols, and the Brit pop bands of the 90's - owe them much more than a wink and a nod.

They were as eclectic as they were electric, and they never toured your country. All of these lead to them being essentially - and criminally - overlooked by American audiences. They were far, far more than the one-hit wonder you've pegged them to be.

Not to mention the fact that Marriott was the greatest blue-eyed soul singer of his generation, if not of all time.

'Tis a true pity there's no room for ravers in your life. But thank god you've got Rod Stewart. (cough, sputter, cough).

Posted by Jazzy on Tuesday, 04.21.09 @ 21:23pm


I don't remember all the tracks, I'd have to dig up the CD. I just remember not being all that impressed.

I didn't say they were a one-hit wonder. I said "Itchycoo Park" was annoying. Cuz it is.

And blue-eyed soul singers? I'd put either of the Righteous Brothers against him any day.

I'm not a big fan of Rod Stewart, either, so kindly quit putting words in my mouth. I just said Rod Stewart's the reason anyone remembers Faces, which is in turn why anyone remembers the Small Faces.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 04.21.09 @ 22:22pm


I think Itchycoo sums up the whole flower power generation pretty succinctly. Skipping school, feeding the ducks, that whole higher consciousness thing if you know what I mean. It's all toooo beautiful, man. Come on Philip, don't be square.

You sound like you're 25 years old or something.

Kudos to Future Rock Legends for giving the Small Faces a 32% chance of induction. I think that's right on target.

Posted by Arrow Man on Tuesday, 04.21.09 @ 23:16pm


You're pretty close with the age Arrow Man.

I think Scott McKenzie "San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair)" or Friend And Lover's "Reach Out In The Darkness" sum up the flower power thing even better.

Of course, I think both those songs are somewhat annoying, too, though San Francisco less so.

Hey... get that fricken daisy out of my face. I don't wanna smell the daisy.... AAAHHH!!! lol

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 04.21.09 @ 23:21pm


I happen to think Itchycoo Park is a great, brilliantly crafted single, but it isn't at all representative of the Small Faces body of work.

Philip,

You've basically admitted to being clueless about the Small Faces' material, so why not either get educated or kindly STFU?

The Righteous Brothers over Steve Marriott? To each his own, I guess.

Posted by Carl Y. on Wednesday, 04.22.09 @ 07:28am


And Philip, your comment about Rod Stewart being the only reason anyone remembers the Small Faces shows a great deal of ignorance and American bias on your part. So if a band was huge in the UK and Europe but did not get significant airplay in the US, they are automatically forgettable in your limited world view?

Had the Small Faces not been screwed over by their management and had they toured the US during their heyday, they likely would be regarded in the US today in same vein as artists like the Kinks and the Who and long ago would have been inducted into the HOF. And I still think they'll get in there sooner or later.

Posted by Carl Y on Wednesday, 04.22.09 @ 07:46am


I am not sure that they would have been regarded in the same manner as the Who and Kinks, but IMO, The Small Faces were a very important band. And what is all the craziness about Itchycoo Park. When I was a teenager and in a band, that was an extremely important song.

Posted by Dameon on Wednesday, 04.22.09 @ 11:36am


I think they would have evolved into a band as great - or greater - than the Who or the Kinks had they stuck it out and kept moving forward from Ogdens. While they were very prolific, they still were only active between the years 1965 - 1968. And they were just kids. One can only imagine what they could have accomplished if Steve hadn't become frustrated and dumped Ronnie and the others. Splintering into Humble Pie and the Faces did none of them any good, IMHO. Nothing against either band, but they just didn't have the style, the uniqueness, the energy, or the electricity of the Small Faces.

Posted by Jazzy on Wednesday, 04.22.09 @ 15:02pm


The Small Faces and Humble Pie will be two bands who sadly, will never have a chance of getting in. The reason being I read a biography on Humble Pie on Rolling Stone Magaizine's website in which they refered to the late, great Steve Marriott and I quote, "Steve Mariot brandished one of the most annoying voices in rock: a hectoring sandpaper parody of black authenticity". That comment makes me so angry because they run the hall and fail to realize his influence on so many singers. Take Robert Plant for example, he was a huge Small Faces fan and for the song "Whole Lotta Love" he essentially covered Mariott's take on "You Need Loving". Also, even though I am a big Zepplin fan and think that Plant and Marriott do have slightly different voices, is that on thier 100 greatest singers list Plant is 15 and the man who influenced didn't even make the list. It's ignorance to denie influence even on later bands like The Black Crowes Marriott's influence can be found. Small Faces and Humble Pie in my opinion are really underrated in the U.S. In England Marriott did make it to number 4 on a 100 greatest rock singers poll for Classic Rock Magazine( if only the men behind that magazine ran the hall). Steve Marriott's legacy will live on even if the Hall and Rolling Stone do not realize it. In addition I just want to say the only reason I blog on Rolling Stone is to support my favorite bands and critize the hall. Thanks to anyone who read this whole post.

Posted by Dude Man on Wednesday, 04.22.09 @ 20:27pm


I read your whole post Dude Man, and I agree with everything you say, except that I think the Small Faces have a chance of getting in (I'd agree with the 30 something percent given here) while Humble Pie has no shot.

I'm an American who first heard the Small Faces in the 70's when Itchycoo Park was re-released. Got me interested. I was shocked that the singer was the guy from Humble Pie. I didn't know Marriott had a prior life (and actually thought he was the one trying to imitate Plant!) and when I started to investigate further and buy old Small Faces albums, I was blown away by the depth and breadth of their material, as well as the range of vocal styles exhibited by Marriott. The maturity and feeling of Steve's voice when he was still just a boy is amazing. It was like he had the soul of an old, black American bluesman, but it came out of the body of little cockney teenage boy. I can't think of anyone else quite like him.

The person above who said the Righteous Brothers were better white soul singers than Steve Marriott clearly has no idea what the word "soul" means.


Posted by Mike G on Thursday, 04.23.09 @ 14:09pm


I love both bands tremendoustly Mike G and they are both worthy of a hall meant to honor the greats ( which it doesn't), but that doesn't mean we can change the fact that the people who vote the artists in hate Steve Marriott and they will not let The Small Faces in due to thier own stubborn opinion.

Posted by Dude Man on Thursday, 04.23.09 @ 15:58pm


"You've basically admitted to being clueless about the Small Faces' material, so why not either get educated or kindly STFU?"--Carl Y.

I thought I said it succinctly: I gave the Small Faces a shot. I wasn't impressed. Sorry if that chafes your chaps so badly.

"And Philip, your comment about Rod Stewart being the only reason anyone remembers the Small Faces shows a great deal of ignorance and American bias on your part. So if a band was huge in the UK and Europe but did not get significant airplay in the US, they are automatically forgettable in your limited world view?"--Carl Y. Part II

Not in my world view, but that of the Hall Of Fame. Look at who the Hall Of Fame has inducted. Is there anyone on that list who didn't make a significant impact on the American musicscape, but did elsewhere? Percy Sledge, maybe, and Leonard Cohen possibly, though I think you could put up the argument on both of them.

Look who's not in though: Johnny Hallyday, Fela, Status Quo, Cliff Richard... it's just reality. If you want to make the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, you have to have made an impact in America.

"The Righteous Brothers over Steve Marriott? To each his own, I guess."

"The person above who said the Righteous Brothers were better white soul singers than Steve Marriott clearly has no idea what the word "soul" means."

Bless you both. You guys probably also think Madonna is a great soul singer. Listen to the Righteous Brothers' "See That Girl," "Dream On," "Give It To The People," "He"... the Righterous Brothers knew soul, and were soul.

Posted by Philip on Thursday, 04.23.09 @ 19:44pm


Dude Man,

I don't think they hate Steve Marriott. I agree with the posters above who stress the American bias of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Americans, even those who are familiar with the likes of Hermans Hermits (who, unlike the SF's, have actually been considered for induction!) and the Dave Clark Five, for the most part don't know who they were and have never heard anything except maybe Itchycoo. Humble Pie was better known in the US, and I certainly enjoyed Steve's work with them, but they didn't live up to their super group expectations.

The Small Faces have a shot simply because there's a decent chance that some major film will use one or more of their songs and set off enough of a a revival to get the Hall to give them proper notice. I think it was Pete Seeger who once said that if the music is truly great, once people get a chance to hear it, they will appreciate it.

Posted by Mike G on Thursday, 04.23.09 @ 20:53pm


I took it upon myself to dig up my CD of their stuff again today, and give it another listen.

To you guys' credit, it's a lot better than I remember. Maybe not quite so forgettable after all. "I Feel So Much Better," "Afterglow,"... that 18 track anthology is packed with a number of good songs. "Lazy Sunday" I gotta admit, made me laugh. Half in a good way, half in an "Are you kidding me?" kind of way. Itchycoo Park is still annoying. lol. But it seems that with a number of acts, the most commercially successful songs by an artist are the ones I like the least.

With all that said, though... I still gotta say No. Really great musicianship, but a few times they reminded me of a bluesier version of the Rationals, another good group with a lot of potential that never got fully realized. Other times, I wasn't sure what to make of it, but it was a good thing. Still, I'm not sure you've got a solid case for them other than Robert Plant mimicking Steve Marriott's vocal style. I think what also hurts the Small Faces is that they were British psychedelia... at the same time Cream was around. Cream just outdid them in about every aspect that the Small Faces tried to accomplish.

On that note, I still don't see how you can call it blue-eyed soul. The only song that struck me as being soulful at all was "Every Little Bit Hurts"... though "Afterglow" did come somewhat close.

In the end, the Small Faces were a good British psychedelic rock band, but that in itself is subdividing a subgenre even further, and for that, I still have to say No.

But thank you to those who berated me, and in doing so, challenged me to listen to it again. If nothing else, that is important.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 05.9.09 @ 19:09pm


Philip, did you listen to thier cover of "You Need Lovin'"? If you did then listen to "Whole Lotta Love" in it the vocal interpretations of Willie Dixon's lyrics sound incredibly similar. Plant and Mariott are both great singers, but no matter what the critics say, Marriott came first and was the better singer. Also, here's a quote from Marriott, "Robert Plant used to follow us around. He was like a fan", yet Marriott had no problem with Plant being heavily by him. Next, on Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Singers list" they had ballots sent in from famous musicians. On Ozzy Osbourne's ballot he put Marriott as the fourth greatest singer and Clem Burke of Blondie put Marriott in the 16th slot and wrote under it "greatest rock singe"(obviously meaning singer). Also they were more than a psychdelic rock band. They also had a lot to do with hard rock . Listen to "Come on Children" and "Wham Bam Than You Mam". Both very proto-metal or at least I think they are. And a lot of happy mod and upbeat rock like "Tin Soldier", "Sha la la la lee"(even though the band themselves hated it), and "All or Nothing". Really a good band and if you don't like them that's fine, but in my opinion and you can quote me on this, they were the best British Invasion band to never make it big here in the U.S.A.

Posted by Dude Man on Saturday, 05.9.09 @ 20:01pm


Dude Man, I compared my CD track listing with the album tracks listed in Billboard's Top Albums, book. There were three (four, if you count Ogdens' charting twice). And surprisingly, there weren't that many album tracks. Strangely enough, "Sha La La La Lee", "Wham Bam Thank You Ma'am". I'm trying to find a link to the CD I've got to give you an idea what I've got to work with. It's an 18 track CD. First track is "Here Comes The Nice", and the last one is "The Autumn Stone."

Don't get me wrong... I liked what I heard. It was good stuff, overall... however, just because I like a group doesn't mean I think they should be inducted in the Hall. Small Faces is one such group.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 05.9.09 @ 20:21pm


Found it... it's this CD here:

http://www.amazon.com/Best-60s-Small-Faces/dp/B00004T88F/ref=sr_1_82?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1241922260&sr=1-82

Tracks:
1. Here Comes The Nice
2. Talk To You
3. Itchycoo Park
4. I'm Only Dreaming
5. Tin Soldier
6. (Tell Me) Have You Seen Me
7. I Feel Much Better
8. Lazy Sunday
9. Rolllin' Over
10. The Universal
11. Donkey Rides, A Penny A Glass
12. Afterglow Of Your Love
13. Wham Bam Thank You Man
14. Every Little Bit Hurts
15. Red Balloon
16. Call It Something Nice
17. Collibosher
18. The Autumn Stone

I don't remember "Wham Bam Thank You Man" being on it, but the rest of the tracks I recall.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 05.9.09 @ 20:27pm


Well that's cool that you found the songs, but if you don't think they're worthy that's okay. I still feel they are.

Posted by Dude Man on Saturday, 05.9.09 @ 20:41pm


That's fine, I can agree to disagree.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 05.9.09 @ 20:44pm


I'm a relatively young fan (27) of the Small Faces, but I literally stumbled upon them somewhere on line several years ago and have become a huge fan. I'm not good with
English words, but I find them to be the most fresh? band from the 1960's. In other words, they sound so much more alive and contemporary than the other bands from their era. Today I listened to a poor quality live recording of Steve singing Every Little Bit Hurts and was reminded of what a soulful intense artist he was. Yes, they belong in the HOF. I know lots of people have pet bands that were good and think they should be in (I have a few myself!) but the Small Faces were not a fluke and they were truly great. They were very young and not treated well by their management and that is a true shame. Please consider them for induction. I'm sure Pete Townsend or Eric Clapton or Paul Weller and many others would be happy to do the honors!

Posted by Misha on Wednesday, 05.13.09 @ 22:22pm


It seems as though Itchycoo Park is one of those songs people either love or hate. I think it's great; it's a complex song with fantastic structure and arrangement. But even among the Small Faces, there were differing opinions about it. Kenney Jones loved it, but I heard an interview with Ian McLagen in which he said he had really hated the song. It was completely Ronnie Lane's song and when McLagen joined Ronnie for a brief tour near the end of Ronnie's career, he told Ronnie he did not want to perform Itchycoo. Ronnie agreed, but was, according to Mac, completely crushed. Sometime after Ronnie's death, he found himself listening to the song again and suddenly found a new appreciation for it and he now performs it live.

But as others have said, Itchycoo is completely unlike anything else the Small Faces ever recorded so no one should judge their career solely on it's merits, love it or hate it. And to categorize them as simply as a "psychedelic rock band", is just flat-out wrong.

Posted by CLL on Friday, 05.15.09 @ 07:03am


I'm not trying to categorize them simply as a psychedlic rock band. The Small Faces certainly weren't psychedelic rock in the same way the Seeds, Blues Magoos, or Easybeats were. The Small Faces were more of a flower-power psychedelia. To me, "flower-power" and "psychedelia" go hand-in-hand; however, not everyone shares my assessment, so if that threw you, I apologize. They were bluesy, but their style was also very much synchronous with the flower-power psychedelic scene. I've seen at least one other comment on this thread that partially concurs with that.

And no, I'm not judging the Small Faces just on "Itchycoo Park," and I really never was. As I said, I went back and gave them another listen. It IS good stuff, but not Hall Of Fame worthy. I'd put the Small Faces in before I put in the Troggs, Honeycombs, Tremaloes, Mindbenders, Freddy And The Dreamers, Gerry And The Pacemakers, and Manfred Mann; however, I'd induct the Zombies, Moody Blues, Spencer Davis Group, and Hollies before putting in the Small Faces.

And if I may be so brash, I'd say that if they're going to induct the Small Faces, it'll be in tandem with Faces, similar to Parliament/Funkadelic. Reason being, other than the lead singer's difference, the Small Faces WERE Faces. (That's a generalization, so don't jump down my throat with all the minutiae and details--I'm aware of them, I'm speaking in a by and large sense.) Even Joel Whitburn lists the two under one listing in his Top Pop Singles books. Just as they inducted both Roth and Hagar when they enshrined Van Halen, I'd imagine both Steve and Rod would be included in a Small Faces/Faces induction.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.15.09 @ 23:32pm


Philip, I agree completely about The Moody Blues needing to be inducted, but I'm not sure about the other three bands you mentioned. I have never heard a song from The Spencer Davis Group(I only know that Steve Winwood was in the band) or Hollies and I have only heard one song by the Zombies("Time of the Season"). Also I would have no problem if The Faces could be inducted with The Small Faces, but I doubt that will happen. They didn't induct Jefferson Starship with Jefferson Airplane and only The Faces have been consider and not The Small Faces. The hall basically picks what members of a band they want to be inducted(ex. Gary Cherone). Bottom line The Small Faces were just a really good rock band that I feel needs to get thier due.

Posted by Dude Man on Saturday, 05.16.09 @ 11:42am


Well, they did but didn't induct Jefferson Starship. When you go to the Hall's site and read the bio on Jefferson Airplane, they very much combine the Jefferson Starship and Starship years as part of the biography of Jefferson Airplane. And honestly, they were right to exclude Gary Cherone from Van Halen's induction.

I think the Faces got put on the back burner because they got Rod in as a soloist. Now that Rod's in as a soloist, I think it's more likely that if Faces were to be inducted, the Small Faces would be considered in with them... inducting Faces would be recognizing the rest of the members of the group now that Stewart's already gotten his recognition, and since the rest of Faces were the majority of Small Faces, I don't see why they wouldn't just include Steve to complete the picture.

As for the other groups: the Zombies had three big hits-- "Time Of The Season," "She's Not There" and "Tell Her No." They were a very bluesy, keyboard-based, group who made very haunting tunes.

The Spencer Davis Group was the group that gave us "Gimme Some Lovin'", and "I'm A Man", both of which are pretty important records, particularly the former. They also had "Keep On Running" and a few other songs of note.

The Hollies... you just need to look them up, Dude Man. So many hit titles, I'm gonna ignore grammatical correctness and just list a few of them: Bus Stop, On A Carousel, Carianne, Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress, Sorry Suzanne, I Can't Let Go, Look Through Any Window, King Midas In Reverse, The Air That I Breathe, He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother, Pay You Back With Interest... etc. They were Graham Nash's first band.

Again, I'm willing to agree to disagree... I just don't appreciate some of the harsher remarks some of the others have made, especially when I made the extra effort to give them another listen, which is more than a lot of people would do.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 05.16.09 @ 12:04pm


I never tried to affend you Philip and if I did let me say I'm sorry. Rest assured I'll look up the songs you mentioned and write back as soon as I can and remember we can still have different opinions.

Posted by Dude Man on Saturday, 05.16.09 @ 12:42pm


Naw man, you've been respectful, and are a really cool new member of our little family of regular posters. Lemme know what you think of the other three groups.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 05.16.09 @ 21:52pm


Philip...another group I remember from around that time was called the Sorrows...they had a song called "Take A Heart" and did a real kickin' version of "Indian Reservation"...BEFORE Paul Revere & the Raiders did it. Just seeing if you remember them.

The song "Itchycoo Park" was released when I was in junior high, maybe earlier, and the only thing I remember was that I HATED it...made me think I never wanted to hear anything from them again...LOL!!! It's funny how later on I heard incarnations of that group, and I really liked Steve Marriott, but never associated the whole thing until a lot later. That's Rock & Roll for ya....!!!

While I'm at it, another instrumental group I just recently heard again from the 50's is Santo & Johnny (Sleepwalker).

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.17.09 @ 08:18am


Actually, I think Don Fardon (the lead singer of the Sorrows) is credited with doing "Indian Reservation"...even though it sounds like the Sorrows. Kinda like John Fogerty solo sounding like CCR, I guess. It's easy to pinpoint who the influences are within a band....

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.17.09 @ 08:46am


The Blues Magoos I remember them from the "Easy Rider" soundtrack (We Ain't Got Nothin' Yet). While we're at it, let's not forget the Holy Modal Rounders (If You Want To Be A Bird)...a group Captain Beefheart would be proud of....LMAO!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.17.09 @ 09:15am


I wanted to add this version of "Indian Reservation" to see who remembers it;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iupp_SmrHqY&feature=related

For my part, it's THE version...

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.17.09 @ 12:53pm


Hey Philip, just checked out the bands you mentioned. Overall The Zombies are really the only one of those bands I can say I'm a fan of, but still don't think they should be inducted before The Small Faces. I had hear "Gimme Some Lovin'" before, but didn't know it was by The Spencer Davis Group. It's an alright song. Looked up the The Hollies and "Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress" has a good riff to it. Keep in mind I've never really been a fan of Crosby, Stills, and Nash(I do enjoy Neil Young's solo career because I tend to enjoy harder rock). Not saying any of those bands don't belong in, but in my opinion I still think The Small Faces belong in more.

Posted by Dude Man on Sunday, 05.17.09 @ 16:45pm


Just to throw in my 2 cents, because I am well familiar with all four bands (The Zombies, Small Faces, Spencer Davis Group, The Hollies) I think a proper order of induction would be
1) The Hollies - IMO the best 60s band not yet inducted. Bus Stop, Carrie Ann, On a Carousel, Just One Look, Dear Eloise, He Ain't Heavy Hes My Brother, Long Cool Woman, Another Night, and Look Through Any Window are among my very favorite songs of the era. With Little Stevie's suport, I hope the Hollies make it the next couple of years.
2) Tie(Small Faces and The Zombies) - The Zombies are a great band and may get inducted eventually, as the Hall seems to keep inducting 60s bands (which I don't mind), but they aren't particularly important beyond their 3 big songs. The (Small) Faces are an important band in the evolution of rock (especially for spawning the careers of Steve Marriott, Rod Stewart, and Ronnie Wood). And Itchygoo Park- love it or hate it? well i Love it
3) Spencer Davis Group - My guess is probbably not. Steve Winwood is already inducted with Traffic and may one day get inducted as a solo artist, but I really do consider a Spencer Davis Group a one-hit wonder, but a very good one. And Dude Man, as far as: "I had hear "Gimme Some Lovin'" before, but didn't know it was by The Spencer Davis Group. It's an alright song."
More like a Great song

Posted by Jonny on Monday, 05.18.09 @ 23:13pm


"real kickin' version of "Indian Reservation"...BEFORE Paul Revere & the Raiders did it."

On the same topic, a group called The Wild Ones had a single called "Wild Thing" sometime in the 60's before a band called The Troggs went to #1 with that same single

Posted by Keebord on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 14:21pm


Dude Man, Long Cool Woman was after Graham Nash had left the Hollies. For his Hollies-days stuff, Bus Stop, On A Carousel, I Can't Let Go, Look Through Any Window, etc. Long Cool Woman songs almost more like a CCR song than a Hollies song, and is pretty atypical of their overall catalog.

The other three are kind of in the same boat, imo. The Zombies probably have the best chance of the three, followed by the Spencer Davis Group, just for the fact that songs of theirs are considered Rock And Roll Standards. Time Of The Season and Gimme Some Lovin' are standards, and each group has two other solid songs that are at least somewhat well-known and were Top 40 hits to make them look more plausible. Itchycoo Park is not a standard, and nothing else by the Small Faces was even close to catching on the way Itchycoo Park did, at least in the U.S.

I still stand by my opinion that the Small Faces are a great example of potential never fully realized. That's the overall impression I'm left with when listening to their stuff, good though a lot of it is.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 16:25pm


Sorry, I didn't know it was made after he left the band and I have not yet heard "On A Carsoul" and "I Can't Let You Go", so I'll look those up. Also, I agree "Time of the Season" is a standard, but I completely disagree about "Gimme Some Lovin'" being a standard and that no Small Faces songs are. "Itchyoo Park" is not even thier best song. The Spencer Davis were not very influencial, but The Small Faces influenced Led Zepplin, The Black Crowes, Blur, and alot of other artists.

Posted by Dude Man on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 18:04pm


Gimme Some Lovin'... covered by the Blues Brothers, part of almost every pep band's canon at basketball and football (gridiron, not soccer) games, one that almost every cover band begins by learning how to play, still heavily played in Oldies radio and sometimes on classic rock stations... I don't see how you can say it's not a standard.

Itchycoo Park is not their best song, agreed, but it IS the closest thing of theirs to being a rock'n'roll standard because it's their best-known song. And from what I understand, the only influenced member of Led Zeppelin was Robert Plant, and then only in terms of singing style. But the band's sound overall was much more influenced by the blues, particularly that of Robert Johnson. Black Crowes, Blur... not a big fan of either and their impact has been marginal to middling, so that they were influenced by the Small Faces honestly doesn't mean a whole lot to me.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 18:17pm


First off The Blues Brothers were a comedy sketch. Does the cowbell skit give "(Don't Fear) the Reaper" more credibility? Second, The Black Crowes had huge impact. They have sold about 20 million albums and are already getting classic rock radio play. Listen to "Come on Children" if you want to hear an influence in terms of music for Led Zepplin. As far as Blur, even though I have not really payed attention to them myself, it's a fact that they only rivaled Oasis in British alternative rock popularity.

Posted by Dude Man on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 18:54pm


The Blues Brothers started out as a comedy sketch and evolved beyond it. They never tried to be a tour-de-force, but for what they did, they actually garnered a bit of critical respect.

Rivaling Oasis in "British alternative rock" is, imo, subdividing a subgenre even further. Although, I'll grant that rivaling Oasis in terms of anything is of some merit.

But that still doesn't really make the case for the Small Faces either.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 19:26pm


Lots of rock subgenres have genres with in them. If you look up heavy metal there are dozens of subgenres. "Britpop" is what British alternative rock is called.

Posted by Dude Man on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 19:42pm


I realize that, but being big within a subgenre of a subgenre isn't exactly a bell-ringer for worthiness.

Gotta admit though, I don't care a whole lot for Britpop. Maybe that's jading me a bit, but if my music was influential to a bunch of Britpop artists, I'd quit the business.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 19:49pm


Rock music is based on personal opinion and is subjective. Not everyone will enjoy a certain rock genre, but no one can deny that genre's impact.

Posted by Dude Man on Tuesday, 05.19.09 @ 20:37pm


I suppose, but it just seems to be getting to a matter of splitting hairs.

Although, I will admit, the more I listen to the CD I have, the more I like it.

Right now, they're a "Eh... no big loss if they don't make it, but if they do, no big scandal.

Posted by Philip on Wednesday, 05.20.09 @ 14:15pm


Good, keep on listening. Well I'll keep looking into The Hollies catalogue and see if anything grows on me.

Posted by Dude Man on Wednesday, 05.20.09 @ 16:32pm


Oi, this place has taken off more than a bit.

I agree with the comment above about subjective opinions and rock and roll bands. But I think it can be said with total objectivity that Steve Marriott was one of the greatest rock vocalists of all time. His voice was incredible. Fact.

The Small Faces didn't take off in America for two reasons. One is because they didn't ever go there to promote anything. And the second, and this is just my opinion, is the fact that they were all over the map as far as the types of music they played. They were teenybopper pop, proto-punk, psychedelic, pre-metal, R&B, straight-out folk, and even vaudevillian. (Ah, wouldn't it be nice to get on with me neighbours...) All in the course of just a few short years with tons of other amazing material swirling all around. They didn't give themselves a chance to stand out in the crowd, especially in a market like the States. In hindsight, however, listening to them now, to these ears at least they sound far superior to most of their contemporaries, and at the end of it all, they should have been standing up there with the true greats of 60's. And Marriott should have stuck it out as meeting Ronnie Lane was the best thing that ever happened to him.

I've been listening a good bit to the Small Faces lately especially material like Don't Burst My Bubble and Donkey Rides a Penny a Glass. Tin Soldier may be my favourite tune of all time. Great stuff. They'll get in eventually. Bookmark it. ;)

Posted by Padraig on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 14:36pm


I agree 100% Padraig. Steve was one of the greatest voices to ever greet a microphone and the band really doesn't get the respect they deserve. I'm not sure if they will get in because of Rolling Stone's hate towards Marriott, but I sure can hope.

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 15:02pm


Honestly, I can't agree with the assessment of Steve's voice. I'll grant that he has versatility in his voice, but I'm not a big fan of its timbre and tone color. I also don't particularly like Robert Plant's voice, or Rod Stewart's for that matter.

I've continued to listen... I got another confession. I don't get why "The Universal" is so well-liked. To me, this is another one of those "WTF were they thinking?" kind of songs. Padraig might consider this Vaudeville, like "Lazy Sunday", but I just cannot get into it. Right now, the four songs of theirs that I really like are "Afterglow (Of Your Love)", "Every Little Bit Hurts", "Collibuster," and "Donkey Rides, Penny A Glass", but little else is flooring me. Maybe if those songs had been the big hits in America, I might see this differently. But if those were the hits for the band, they might already be in, as well. I dunno. I still hear a lot of potential that was never reached, particularly in "Here Comes The Nice," "Talk To You," and "Tell Me Have You Seen Me."

And "Itchycoo Park" still annoys me. (It's a running gag, get it?)

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 17:44pm


Don't understand, Philip. You'd see songs differently if they had been hits in America as opposed to somewhere else? I don't get that; either you like the songs or you don't. Why would it matter to your own ears if they were hits in Japan vs. the UK vs. Lincoln, Nebraska?

I'm Irish by birth, but I grew up in London and lived for a number of years in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. I think I might have heard Tin Soldier once, probably on WBRU. Aside from that I never heard the Small Faces played or mentioned on US radio. But it wouldn't make me like the songs any more or less if I had.

I really like The Universal, and I don't see it as anything close to vaudville (Lazy Sunday, Happy Days Toy Town - yes). I'd say it's sort of a stripped down folk song. Steve recorded it in his back garden (you can hear his dog barking in the background) and the others added the instruments later. As is much of the Small Faces' material, it's quirky and offbeat, and I'm frankly not suprised that it wasn't the hit Steve thought it would be.

But as Dude Man says, this sort of stuff (Steve's voice aside!) is subjective. Hell, I'm Irish and I can't stand U2. And don't get me started on those Manchurian Gallagher Brothers.....

Posted by Padraig on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 18:49pm


Regardless if you don't personally enjoy his voice, you can't deny people have loved and been influenced by that voice. Who do you think are good singers? Also, I'm surpised with your choice of songs by the band. I know "Afterglow(of your Love)" is great, but I wouldn't consider "Collibuster" and "Donkey Rides, Penny A Glass" thier best work. "Tin Soldier", "All or Nothing", "Come on Children", and "Afterglow(of your Love" are my favorites. And Philip, no offense or anything, but the "Itchycoo Park" jokes are starting to get a little annoying.

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 19:04pm


No no no, you read me wrong there. I like the songs just fine. My opinion of the songs themselves are the same regardless of how they charted.

What would change is how worthy of the Hall the Small Faces would be if the right songs had been hits in America. I say this for two reasons: one, as I noted above, the people at the Hall have an American bias; two, I also believe that Impact is/should be a pillar when determining if an act should be in the HoF. Impact doesn't necessarily equal hits, but hits ARE a part of the equation. I don't think the Small Faces left the impression they would have liked to have made in the U.S. As you said, part of that is promotions and the lack thereof. But other factors are involved with it as well. If the impression that the Small Faces made in the U.S. was with songs like Afterglow, Every Little Bit Hurts, The Autumn Stone (another one I really like but forgot to mention); instead of Itchycoo Park, Lazy Sunday (both of which have elements of plain silliness to them) and Tin Soldier, which imo is pretty generic-sounding and similar to other songs by other artists; how the Small Faces are viewed by history and myself would be vastly different. But those three songs are not only the only hits they had in the U.S., but also the only songs that made an Impact. No other album tracks were getting attention in the early days of free-form FM radio; they don't have any songs that are considered "Non-charted classics" like the Beatles, Stones, Led Zeppelin, and even the Mamas And The Papas have.

I hope that clears things up.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 19:10pm


"Regardless if you don't personally enjoy his voice, you can't deny people have loved and been influenced by that voice."--Dude Man

The only one I've seen mentioned that was influenced by Steve's singing style is Robert Plant. The others that I'm reading about were influenced by the music overall, but not necessarily the voice of Steve Marriott.

"Who do you think are good singers?"--DM

Well, I'm a sucker for vocal harmonies, but among RnR Hall of Famers, I like Frankie Valli, Elvis Presley, Paul McCartney, Brian Wilson, Sam Cooke, Bono, Sam & Dave, Tony Williams, Johnny Moore, Ben E. King, Bobby Darin, Ricky Nelson, etc.

"Also, I'm surpised with your choice of songs by the band. I know "Afterglow(of your Love)" is great, but I wouldn't consider "Collibuster" and "Donkey Rides, Penny A Glass" thier best work."--Dude Man

Collibuster just has an amazing groove to it. A great song to jam on while driving or while typing at the computer. Donkey Rides has the Vaudevillian charm of Lazy Sunday, but isn't as silly and has the edge in it of guitar that keeps it interesting.

""Tin Soldier", "All or Nothing", "Come on Children", and "Afterglow(of your Love" are my favorites."--Dude Man

Well, my disc doesn't have All Or Nothing or Come On Children. I'll see if I can find them on YouTube or something later on and get back to you on those.

"And Philip, no offense or anything, but the "Itchycoo Park" jokes are starting to get a little annoying."--Dude Man

That's fine. A good comedian knows when the joke is getting stale.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 19:21pm


Okay, I understand a bit better now, Philip, and I see what you mean about the Hall's bias towards US hit charters.

However and regardless of my disdain for certain Brit Pop acts, I don't think we can underestimate Britain's contribution to Rock and Roll from 1964 forward. And the Small Faces are a noted major influence on many of the British bands that followed them and these bands had hits all over the place, North America included. In that sense, I see them as "unique and influential in their genres." Plural left in, of course.

With regards to Stephen's voice, I did a little googling and note that he was recently listed as 4th greatest vocalist by Classic Rock magazine. British, of course, but Paul Stanley says he was "unbelievable". And I agree.

http://www.classicrockmagazine.com/news/steve-marriott-was-unbelievable-%e2%80%93-more-on-one-of-classic-rocks-star-singers/

Posted by Padraig on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 19:34pm


"However and regardless of my disdain for certain Brit Pop acts, I don't think we can underestimate Britain's contribution to Rock and Roll from 1964 forward. And the Small Faces are a noted major influence on many of the British bands that followed them and these bands had hits all over the place, North America included. In that sense, I see them as "unique and influential in their genres." Plural left in, of course."--Padraig

Good point, and I think we will see more and more British acts make it once artists of the 90's and 00's become eligible. However, I feel relatively confident in saying it's the acts that made it big in America that will be inducted, not necessarily the acts that influenced the acts that made it big in America. It'd be like inducting a center into the (Gridiron) Football Hall of Fame because he successfully completed so many snaps that eventually resulted in passes or handoffs that got major yardage and/or touchdowns. I mean, yeah, if the snap isn't successful, the play won't be made, but it's not generally considered the crux of the major play either. Hope that makes sense. I don't know of a good soccer analogy to use.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 19:42pm


That's okay, Philip. I swing both ways - American football and The Rest of the Bloody World Football. Rather like American football, aside from all the fits and starts and commercials.

But I'm tellin' ya, they'll get in. And it will probably be Marriott's voice that tips the scale for them. Between youtube and the upcoming inductees you mention, that voice - and the Small Faces themselves - are forces that will have to be reckoned with.

Posted by Padraig on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 19:55pm


"But I'm tellin' ya, they'll get in. And it will probably be Marriott's voice that tips the scale for them. Between youtube and the upcoming inductees you mention, that voice - and the Small Faces themselves - are forces that will have to be reckoned with."--Padraig

Maybe they will. As Yogi Berra said, "It's tough to make predictions - especially about the future." Steve's voice may be the tipping point, but I think it could just as well be that the committee looks at Small Faces and Faces as a combined single entity. Which would be odd, actually, considering the two entities' styles were very different.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 20:09pm


Aren't the (Small) Faces actually listed as one entity by the Hall? That would be the first thing that needs to be straightened out. They were different bands; the "Faces" name was only used because the record company insisted on it. And as I think about this, I wonder if this isn't one of the things that has thus far worked against the Small Faces...maybe they think of them as Rod Stewart's backing band before they grew to their full height.

Posted by Padraig on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 20:24pm


A couple things wrong with that statement. One, they're not listed as anything by the Hall. Neither the Small Faces nor Faces have been inducted. The only one I know of who does is Joel Whitburn, who owns and puts out the Record Research books. And he does it for reason number two. Two, they weren't completely different bands. The styles were different, but for the most part, the bands were the same, major difference being the lead singer. It's more akin to the same band deciding to go a new direction. As a sidebar, using the name Faces as a means to preserve continuity isn't really a bad thing. I mean, if you want to think of the Cadets and Jacks as separate groups, fine, but they really weren't. Three, the Small Faces weren't Rod Stewart's backing band at all until Steve left them to form Humble Pie. It's when they became Faces that they were "Rod's backing band."

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 21:01pm


Wait one minute; I'm not following this one:

"Three, the Small Faces weren't Rod Stewart's backing band at all until Steve left them to form Humble Pie. It's when they became Faces that they were "Rod's backing band.""


As I believe you are saying, the remainder didn't recruit Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood until after Steve had left them. I think Ronnie L. said it was eight months that they lay around all depressed before Rod formally agreed to front them.

Ronnie Lane was not a front-and-center sort of bloke and Rod Stewart very quickly turned the new band into his backing band.

But they were not the same band. No one who knows the music or the history can credibly argue otherwise. Perhaps it's time to line up some affidavits from Kenney Jones and Mac to that effect!

Posted by Padraig on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 21:25pm


Like I said, stylistically, they were definitely not the same, but from a line-up perspective, they pretty much were.

I've also gone to YouTube and checked out the songs mentioned on this thread I wasn't familiar with:

Sha La La La Lee--Seriously? I thought this could have been a Manfred Mann song. That's how underwhelmed I was with it. Catchy, but very little else.

All Or Nothing--Great song, but a slower ballad-type song. Not a great piece of evidence in arguing their case for the Hall.

Come On Children--This struck me as a hype song... a song you use to hype up the crowd to get them more into your show. Works better live than on a record. Not too special, imo.

You Need Loving--Good bluesy song, great feel, but again, one that seems better suited for live shows only than for a record.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 21:46pm


Oh, I forgot to get back to you Philip on the Hollies' songs. I really like "I Can't Let You Go" especially that backround riff. And "Look Through Any Window" has a great intro. As for the singers I think most of those are great(enough though I feel some of them don't belong because they are not rock and roll acts) and honestly I feel Marriott is right up there with them. Sorry, if I came off a little blunt about the kiding around. Joke as much as you want. And Padraig I have to tell you one sad truth. As much as you and I hope Steve's voice will play factor in there induction chances, it won't because critics hate it. Here's a direct quote from Rolling Stone, one of the key groups running the hall, about Steve's voice from thier entry on Humble Pie, "...Steve Marriott brandished one of the most annoying voices in rock: a hectoring sandpaper parody of black authenticity." I posted that before up top, but I'm guessing you didn't see it and that comment really gets me frustrated considering who he and the rest of the Small Faces influenced.

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 21:54pm


Yo, Dude Man, I hear you, mate, but, re Rolling Stone:

People die. Great music doesn't

And I'm not much of a Humble Pie fan myself. But regarding Steve's vocals, I'm going to re-post the link below, Cheers and good night to all.

http://www.classicrockmagazine.com/news/steve-marriott-was-unbelievable-%E2%80%93-more-on-one-of-classic-rocks-star-singers/


Posted by Padraig on Friday, 05.22.09 @ 22:13pm


Interesting reading here :)
I would like to contribute to this thread because I think The Small Faces and Steve in particular are highly underrated. They may not be well known to the wider audience but I think they were very influential band.
First of all I would like to sorry about my bad English but I hope you'll understand me ;).
Ok so here are my thoughts and things which I've found in the net.
1.As other people mentioned their material was very varied (garage R&B,pop,psychedelic pop,vaudeville, proto-metal, soul, folk)so thanks to this they influenced many musicians from different genres. Did you know that Glen Matlock from Sex Pistols is a huge fan? They had ‘Whatcha Gonna Do About It’ and ‘Understanding’ in their live set. Of course Paul Weller is a big fan and The Jam, Oasis, Blur, Led Zeppelin (not only Percy was a fan, Page too, Steve even was his first choice as a singer when he tried to form The New Yardbirds- it's quite interesting story actually),
oh and here are Plant's own words about Steve
'(interviewer)Watching you now in The Song Remains the Same — the swagger, the posing, is still a great thing to see.
Robert Plant:But I didn't know it was posing. It's only now with an older head, I go, "Oh, God, did that actually work?" But of course it worked. It was as genuine as the day is long. I didn't preen in front of a mirror. My mother said, "You shouldn't pout, it looks stupid." But I pouted because I wanted to be like, "Come on!" I wanted to be Steve Marriott, for ****'s sake. '

'in a 1977 interview with Ray Coleman, Robert Plant referred to Steve Marriot, the lead singer for the Small Faces, as "the master of white contemporary blues."
"I could never be compared with Steve Marriott because he's too good, unfortunately! He's got the best white voice, for sheer bravado and balls."'

first post - to be continued ;)

Posted by Mojo Pin on Saturday, 05.23.09 @ 12:39pm


Keith Richards is a long time admirer of Steve Marriot's work (and of course Small Faces)
Here's the link to the interview ;)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNKckhYqNBk
(on a side note Marriott almost ended up in The Rolling Stones after Taylor's departure, but during an audition he upstaged Jagger. Jagger didn't agree to have him in the band).

Posted by Mojo Pin on Saturday, 05.23.09 @ 12:43pm


on youtube there is a very good documentary about a band. It helps to understand why they never toured in US and why Steve left them :-/ (which for me is a very sad thing because with Ronnie they were an excellent songwriting duo, although they wrote rather separately - for example I know that Tin Soldier, the Autumn Stone, All or Nothing, The Universal, Wham Bam Thank You Mam, I'm only Dreaming are Stive's songs - but there was a magic between them, they influenced and complete each other so well)
part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZRcdWfqlyk&feature=related
I can't add more parts because they treat me as a spammer ;)

third post- to be continued ;)

Posted by Mojo Pin on Saturday, 05.23.09 @ 12:44pm


2. Now I would like to say something about Steve Marriot.
I find it really amazing what diversity as a vocalist he showed us through a 10 years when he was the most active (Small Faces/Humble Pie).
He did it all, with HP we can add hard rock, heavy rock, R&B, gospel, bluegrass, country, soul.
And in everything he was equally convincing.
Personally I prefer Small Faces's stuff, HP released couple of really uninspiring, bad albums (last four) but Steve as a boogie-driven hard rock singer and performer influenced some musicians too. Including Bon Scott(Ac/DC)(I think I've read somewhere that rest of the band considered Steve as a replacement after Scott's death), Paul Stanley (Kiss), Steve Perry (Journey), Kevin DuBrow(Quiet Riot)and I can bet that many more ;).
So how many more singers do you know with that extraordinary stylistic range?

I also like this piece from Glen Matlock's (Sex Pistols)interview
'Well, the best gig I ever saw was Humble Pie at Hyde Park in 1971 when they supported Grand Funk Railroad. Blew them off the stage they did! And my favourite all time live album would have to be Pie’s ‘Rockin The Fillmore’, a truly great performance, loved ‘I Don’t Need No Doctor’ and all the between track chat.'
well when a punk rocker appreciates some 26 minutes songs then it has to be something magical in it... ;)

also I think this article is quite interesting to read
http://www.beachwoodreporter.com/music/steve_marriott_humbled_by_the.php


P.S. haha I think that The Rolling Stones magazine was against Steve from the beginning
when in Nov 12 ,1970 Mike Saunders reveiewed HP's first album.
'Here they were a noisy, unmelodic, heavy metal-leaden shit-rock band, with the loud and noisy parts beyond doubt'

terrible review but it has to be noted that the phrase 'heavy metal' was used for the firs time in this review.

fourth post- the last one :)

Posted by Mojo Pin on Saturday, 05.23.09 @ 12:46pm


This another BBC documentary about a band, worth checking out IMO
http://www.glasgowmods.co.uk/2008/09/10/the-story-of-the-small-faces/

Posted by Mojo Pin on Saturday, 05.23.09 @ 17:53pm


Here's an interview from Dan Baird(former singer and guitarist for the Georgia Satellites) about how great Steve and the Small Faces were.

http://youtube.com/watch?v5lOY7erbuI

Posted by Dude Man on Saturday, 05.23.09 @ 20:53pm


With all due respect, talk is cheap. It's easy to say you admire and respect something, especially when that object of admiration is the subject of discussion and the lights and cameras are on. I mean, Paul McCartney once said that the Crew Cuts, being one of the first acts he saw live, made him want to become a singer. But no one's clamoring for the Crew Cuts' induction on this statement (except Roy).

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 05.23.09 @ 22:24pm


With all due respect, I don't understand Philip.
What's wrong in showing that Small Faces and Steve are highly rated by fellow musicians? At least they have a taste which is lacking in music media nowadays (and sadly to my knowledge many things are manipulated and journalists seldom are allowed to write for example a honest review about artist's album for example because they fear to lost credibility or reviews aren't passed by executives) ;).
For you especially I've got something about The Beatles too:
'KENNEY JONES (SF's drummer): McCartney was a big, big fan. In fact, all the
Beatles were big fans. I only saw John Lennon walk through Olympic
studios once, sort of said hello and walked out. After the fact,
I'm good friends with Ringo and Paul, and see George here and
there and say hello, whatever. I've had the opportunity to play
with Paul, did the Rockestra with Paul and John Bonham, one of
the last things he did before he died. The Beatles were great
fans, they thought we were stunning, without a doubt. They gave
us a lot of encouragement, you see, because they'd had three years
head start on us. Giving mainly Steve and Ronnie advice on what
to do, how to cope. They were mixing because they used to go to
the same clubs -- I never used to go. They were quite nice, you
know'

I think that if management would allowed them to tour US things might have looked totally different for this band. Shame that they never had a chance to promote their music in USA.
Please watch these documents Philip, they really were HUGE in the UK, and made there a big impact in music world and as a cultural phenomenon. They were The Authentic mod band, not like The Who which firstly were musicians and their manager styled them to mods.

Posted by Mojo Pin on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 01:31am


'It's easy to say you admire and respect something, especially when that object of admiration is the subject of discussion and the lights and cameras are on'

Actually I have much more respect for musicians and what they think than for music journalists...
You know for example Paul Weller even when he was in The Jam, they had some SF's songs in their live sets. It's not fake he really love the band.

Posted by Mojo Pin on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 01:41am


"With all due respect, I don't understand Philip.
What's wrong in showing that Small Faces and Steve are highly rated by fellow musicians?"--Mojo Pin

Sorry, I forgot your English isn't the best, though you're actually quite good with it. What I said was: "It's easy to say you admire and respect something, especially when that object of admiration is the subject of discussion and the lights and cameras are on."

What this means is that when a journalist asks a celebrity or legend their opinion of a band or musician is, that celebrity or legend will usually say nothing but nice things on them, usually as a professional courtesy. It's only when they're drunk, in a bad mood, or not knowing what a candid moment that they're in, that you will hear them say something negative. In short, of course these people said wonderful things; they're pretty much supposed to. When they're being recorded for posterity, you're only going to see and hear positive things. You have to, as we English-speakers say, "take it with a grain of salt." Your quote from Kenney Jones pretty much proves that. Kenney said nothing but nice things about the Beatles. He may have had other not-so-nice things to say, but chose not to say them, or did, but those comments were edited out.

And as you pointed out, no journalist or documentarian is going to publish or keep a clip in if it is too detrimental to the point they're trying to make. There is a heavy editing process involved.

I agree that the Small Faces didn't get ample opportunity to do more in the U.S., but that doesn't mean they should be inducted in the Hall either as a means of reconciliation.

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 01:48am


"You know for example Paul Weller even when he was in The Jam, they had some SF's songs in their live sets. It's not fake he really love the band."

Well, that's conditional upon how much weight you give the opinion of Paul Weller and the Jam. For myself, the fact that the Jam has been considered (though not nominated) does give it some bearing, but I'm not terribly familiar with their stuff beyond "That's Entertainment," so it doesn't mean as much to me as it obviously does to you.

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 02:11am


Funny thing, I was just going through the Small Faces page on Rhapsody and there's a song called "Autumn Stone" which sounds a lot like "House of Cards" by Radiohead...as a matter of fact they're eerily similar.There was some obvious influence there...or, at the very least, a VERY strong coincidence. The point I'm trying to make is basically I agree with Philip...musicians can pretty much say anything about others, but the proof of influence is in the music they make...did they like them enough to emulate them...?

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 08:03am


Why don't I have a quick round up of everything the Small Faces did? They had countless hits in the U.K., the predecessors to the '90s Britpop scene, experimented with many genres(country, blue-eyed soul, R&B, proto-metal, pop-rock, hard rock, vaudeville, ballads, beat, blues rock, etc.), and here's a short list of some of the musicians/bands who have been influenced, covered, or loved the music of Steve and The Small Faces:
-Ozzy Osbourne
-Clem Burke(Blondie)
-The Black Crowes
-Led Zepplin
-Blur
-Steve Perry(Journey)
-Bon Scott(AC/DC)
-Paul Stanley(KISS)
-Quiet Riot
-The Sex Pistols
-Great White
-Dan Baird(former Geogia Satellits memeber)
-Keith Richards(Rolling Stones)
-The Libertines

Posted by Dude Man on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 11:55am


Also, here's some film of the Steve Marriott tribute concert in which members of Oasis, The Jam, and several other famous musicians payed tribute to the legend:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hip4qDjfGKI

Posted by Dude Man on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 12:37pm


Thanks for all the links, folks. I think there are are several clips from the 2001 tribute to Marriott on youtube. I've got a copy of tape somewhere around here.

A couple of additional high profile names for your list, Dude Man. Mick Jones from the Clash, Billy Bragg, and Noel Gallagher - all stated big admirers of the SFs. And I'm sure there are many others.

And may I point out that as fantastic as Steve was, Ronnie Lane played a major role in making the Small Faces' music what it was. Ronnie was much loved and respected by the British rocker community. Here you'll see Ronnie getting by with the help of a few friends: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wr2Fg3Lpc_M

Posted by Padraig on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 20:39pm


I just found another fan to add to the list.

http://www.rollingstone/news/story/6487138/elvis_costello

It's a long read, so stroll down to the part about his musicial childhood. In the interview Elvis Costello admits The Small Faces were an influence on his song "Rocking Horse Road".

Posted by Dude Man on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 21:42pm


Thanks for the great reading. Though, Dude Man, I don't know if I'd include Elvis Costello... there's a difference between inspiring/influencing a song and being an influence/inspiration on an artist/group as a whole. I think Gitarzan stated my point quite well.

If you guys have any information on the chart history in the UK of the Small Faces, that'd be greatly appreciated. I know we're not supposed to put too much emphasis on it, but I re-interject my football center analogy: to me, the Small Faces are the center that successfully snapped the ball to the QB who threw the TD passes to the WR's, or handed to the RBs that got the major yard gains.

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 22:10pm


If I have some time in the next few days, I'll see if I can dig up their chart history. If anyone else has it handy though, please feel free.

Philip, while I don't disagree with your comment about Costello, I'm sorry, but I think your football analogy is far too simplistic and linear for use when talking about musical inspiration.

Posted by Padraig on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 22:23pm


Well no analogy's ever perfect, but I think it makes the point. Both Richard Barrett and Jesse Belvin are considered pioneers in the West coast R&B style that permeated throughout the late 50s and through the 60's. Marv Johnson's inaugural recordings for the Motown (Tamla) labels/family served as a template for what would become known as the Motown sound. None of these men are in the Hall Of Fame for perhaps the same reason the Small Faces aren't.

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 05.24.09 @ 22:57pm


Small Faces hit singles and UK chart positions:

What'Cha Gonna Do About It - Highest position: 14
Sha La La la Lee - Highest position: 3
Hey Girl - Highest position: 10
All or Nothing - Highest position: 1
My Mind's Eye - Highest position: 4
I Can't Make It - Highest position: 26
Here Comes The Nice - Highest position: 12
Itchycoo Park - Highest position: 16
Tin Soldier - Highest position: 9
Lazy Sunday - Highest position: 2
The Universal - Highest position: 16
Afterglow of Your Love - Highest position: 36

The band had broken up several months before the release of Aferglow in early '69. Also, Lazy Sunday and Itchycoo Park were re-released and charted again in the mid-1970's, I believe fairly high, although I don't have the numbers handy. Itchycoo also charted again in the US circa 1976.









Posted by Padraig on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 11:00am


Small Faces hit singles and UK chart positions:

What'Cha Gonna Do About It - Highest position: 14
Sha La La la Lee - Highest position: 3
Hey Girl - Highest position: 10
All or Nothing - Highest position: 1
My Mind's Eye - Highest position: 4
I Can't Make It - Highest position: 26
Here Comes The Nice - Highest position: 12
Itchycoo Park - Highest position: 16
Tin Soldier - Highest position: 9
Lazy Sunday - Highest position: 2
The Universal - Highest position: 16
Afterglow of Your Love - Highest position: 36

The band had broken up several months before the release of Aferglow in early '69. Also, Lazy Sunday and Itchycoo Park were re-released and charted again in the mid-1970's, I believe fairly high, although I don't have the numbers handy. Itchycoo also charted again in the US circa 1976.









Posted by Padraig on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 11:00am


Got another one, Gavin Rossdale of Bush is quoted calling the Small Faces a great band.

http://www.whosdatedwho.com/celebrity/quotes/gavin-rossdale.htm

I'm sure the list goes on and on and the lack of U.S. shouldn't mean much. The Velvet Underground did nothing on the charts and got inducted and the Stooges get nominated almost every year.

Posted by Dude Man on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 11:18am


Opps, lack of U.S. hits I meant.

Posted by Dude Man on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 11:19am


It seems to me that the fame of this band comes from what it manifested, and not so much what they did as a core group. Being a young teen (and aspiring musician) during their "heyday", I can assure you that outside of "Itchycoo Park", their exposure in the states was virtually non-existent (and I didn't know many people who were crazy about that song...reminded people of "Feelin' Groovy" by Harper's Bazaar).

Posted by Gitarzan on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 11:52am


Like I said, should exopsure shouldn't matter influence should. The Britpop scene, which don't have to be a fan of, but you can't deny it's importance, was heavily influenced by this band. The Velvet Underground made zero impact on the charts, The Stooges have been considered many times and did nothing on the charts, and the Ramones, people forget "Blizkrieg Bop" and some of thier other key sons didn't even dent the charts.

Posted by Dude Man on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 12:28pm


Please ignore the fact that I made countless grammar mistakes in my post and will someone please delete "LIL JON's" comments. They have no relationship to this topic.

Posted by Dude Man on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 12:32pm


So this is how journalists perceive the band.
I'm pleasantly surprised.
Vanity Fair reckons they brought “some authentic East End swagger to the suspiciously posh Swinging London scene.” Mojo singled them out as “the most under-rated band of the late 60s.” Q magazine called them “the most completely perfect group that England ever made.” And Record Collector rates Steve Marriott as “probably Britain’s finest-ever soul singer.”

Oh and I would like to mention that
In 1996, they were belatedly awarded the Ivor Novello Outstanding Contribution to British Music "Lifetime Achievement" award. (Ivor Novello are awards for songwriting and composing. They are respected worldwide as the major platform for recognising and rewarding Britain's songwriting and composing talents. The Ivors remain
the only award ceremony in the musical calendar that is not influenced by publishers and record companies but judged and presented by the
writing community. The Award itself is a solid bronze sculpture of Euterpe - the Muse of lyric poetry.)

Posted by Mojo Pin on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 13:32pm


Ogden's Nut Gone Flake was a no 1 album for six weeks. On its release, Melody Maker welcomed the album as: “incredibly, unbelievably, irresistible - just so groovy and quite indescribable.” ;-)

Phil I agree with you that "It's easy to say you admire and respect something, especially when that object of admiration is the subject of discussion and the lights and cameras are on" but Keith Richards wasn't asked about Steve. Robert Plant in my first quote also wasn't asked. I truly believe that those were very genuine statements.

Posted by Mojo Pin on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 14:06pm


*Philip, not Phil. So sorry about that.

Posted by Mojo Pin on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 14:10pm


for me its

1) The Clash
2) The Kinks
3) Small Faces

and sometimes not necessarily in that order. I love the tracks where they really rock out like Don't Burst My Bubble and Come On Children.

Posted by gityer on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 12:56pm


They probably didn't sell enough records here in the U.S. like they did in the U.K.. Sounds like a pretty good suspect to me. Other than that... What's keepin' em out of the RRHOF.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 14:07pm


Dude Man, the VU and Stooges were both highly influential in the U.S. AND well-recognized for their songs, even if they didn't chart.

"It seems to me that the fame of this band comes from what it manifested, and not so much what they did as a core group."--Gitarzan

That's a really important point, though that's also kind of the point of influence.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 17:23pm


I believe thier influence came from thier music. Go up to Oasis or Blur and ask them about the Small Faces music and what impact it had on them. Besides the whole point you made is that they did not "get ample opportunity to do more in the U.S.". Well, the bands I mention didn't get any oppotunity either, but they still get respect. Look at all the people/bands that have admitted loving this band's music. Do all those fans mean nothing? Why are the opinions of the fans of the Stooges and the VU considered more important?

Posted by Dude Man on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 17:40pm


"Well, the bands I mention didn't get any oppotunity either, but they still get respect."

Untrue. The VU were Andy Warhol's house band. When you have Andy Warhol patronizing you like a Catholic Cardinal patronized artists and writers during the Rennaissance, you're getting a good amount of opportunity. Also, with the VU located in the Big Apple itself, one of the top three markets in the US (if not the biggest)... well, they say the three most important things in business are location, location, location. The Stooges definitely had a lot of opportunity either, partially because they stayed a band longer than Small Faces or Velvet Underground.

Again Oasis and Blur may have some pull with their status, but I think Gitarzan has a point, too: Small Faces are known more for influencing other British groups more than they're remembered for their actual music. VU are known for Sweet Jane, Rock And Roll, That's The Story Of My Life, etc. And the Stooges are known for "I Wanna Be Your Dog", "Loose," "Search And Destroy," "Down On The Street"... the Small Faces are remembered for "Itchycoo Park," which imo, isn't the best way to remember them, musically. Again, speaking from a pure U.S. perspective, but fair nonetheless.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 18:13pm


"Other than that... What's keepin' em out of the RRHOF."--Joe-Skee

Two things, imo. One, Cream is in. They competed with Cream for the "top dog of 60's British psychedlic rock" title, and Cream won. From a musical perspective, they're considered second banana to Cream. Two, Rod Stewart is in. If they had called themselves ANYTHING but "Faces" after Steve Marriott left and Rod joined, they'd have a much better shot. Unfortunately, from a critical perspective, the Small Faces are remembered for becoming Faces, and Faces is remembered as the band that really launched his career, moreso than the Jeff Beck Group.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 18:19pm


Says Phillip

"If they had called themselves ANYTHING but "Faces" after Steve Marriott left and Rod joined, they'd have a much better shot. Unfortunately, from a critical perspective, the Small Faces are remembered for becoming Faces, and Faces is remembered as the band that really launched his career, moreso than the Jeff Beck Group."

I don't agree with this at all. Who are these confused critics? Can you name any? The only people who might think this are the people who don't know anything about the history of the Small Faces, and they can't be relevant to this discussion because they don't even know who the Small faces were!

Rolling Stone really liked Ogdens Nut Gone Flake at the time of release, BTW. The original review is here:

http://www.rollingstone.com/artists/smallfaces/albums/album/122531/review/6067661/ogdens_nut_gone_flake


Posted by gityer on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 18:40pm


Liking one album at the time is a bit different from long-term memory.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 18:43pm


Hey, Philip,

That wasn't my point. Somebody above said that Rolling Stone hated Marriottt. And I said they liked Ogdens "AT THE TIME".

I've read the stuff here and you don't the Small Faces which is cool. So why are you so vigilent in slagging them off? I don't like plenty of bands out here and disagree with some peoples opinions, but I don't hang out at there sites like a bloody sentry and try to respond to every post made.

Did you even bother or have time to read the review before you posted your response? Didn't think so.

Posted by Gityer on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 18:52pm


I hadn't when I typed the response, because your comment of "at the time" was the first thing that caught my eye, so I thought I'd make that point before reading the article. Is that okay? Am I allowed to do that?

I don't hate the Small Faces. I've mentioned on this thread a few times that I've gotten more and more into them the more I listen to them. But liking an artist doesn't mean you think they belong in the Hall Of Fame.

I'm not vigilantly slagging them off, or at least not trying to. I'm just trying to be a part of the discussion. That's really all we're doing here: discussing their merits. I'm not trying to be abrasive, unless I feel like someone's trying to get up in my face about it. Simply rebutting the points is discussion.

And this isn't a site for the Small Faces. This is a page on a site dedicated to the Small Faces, which is equivalent to a thread on a message board/forum. The site is about the RnRHoF, and ultimately, that's what I'm trying to make my points in the discussion about. I'd suggest you calm down. This isn't life and death--our opinions don't even mean squat to the people who make the decisions. I bet if anyone in the nominating committee reads the posts on this site, they spend half that time laughing and shaking their heads at the stuff we write. So please don't take it too seriously. It's not worth flaming other people about.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 19:08pm


Once again (with feeling), I don't think it's a matter of liking or disliking them...it's a matter of relevence as to whether they are HoF worthy, which I don't think the core group is. Marriott and Lane definitely expanded their horizons later on, and "Ogden" is considered a classic in a lot of circles. That being considered, you can say that about a lot of bands whose members went on to bigger & better things or groups that put out at least one "classic" album.

Like I stated earlier, "Itchycoo Park" was released when I was in my early teens, was my first exposure to Small Faces, and was kind of a mediocre song...nothing spectacular (IMO).

When you're young and impresionable, particularly with music, you've only got one shot to make a first impression...

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 19:08pm


"This is a page on a site dedicated to the Small Faces"

Sorry, bad syntax. Meant "This is a page dedicated to the Small Faces, on a site that isn't just dedicated to the Small Faces.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 19:09pm


"That being considered, you can say that about a lot of bands whose members went on to bigger & better things or groups that put out at least one "classic" album."--Gitarzan

This is true... after all, they did induct the Yardbirds after all. And imo, I think this was probably also why the Coasters were inducted too... not to take anything away from the music. I think the music of both those groups is fantastic, but I've felt that both groups were proving grounds for people who went on to do, or had already done, some big things were a part of why they were inducted.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 19:18pm


Okay, we get it already! You guys think "Itchyoo Park" is annoying. You don't have to bring it up every 5 seconds and in my opinion I can think of lots of Beach Boy songs just as annoying(for the record I'm not trying to offend any Beach Boy fans when I say that).

Also, among musicians it's not thier best known song. Quiet Riot covered "Afterglow(of Your Love)" and "Tin Soldier" with the late, great Randy Rhoads. The Sex Pistols used to cover "Whatcha Gonna Do About It" and "Understanding" live. Great White covered "Afterglow(of Your Love)". "Lazy Sunday" inspired Blur to write thier song "Parklife" and it was also covered by the Libertines. These bands appreciated them for alot more songs than "Itchyoo Park".

I didn't know anything the VU did, but "Heroin" and "Sweet Jane" until you brought up thier other songs. From the Stooges I only knew "I Wanna Be Your Dog" and "Search and Destroy". Also, Philip if you said those bands had an opportunity than why were they still not successful and why are they remembered? Influence, like the Small Faces that's the reason. At least the Small Faces had success in the U.K. That's more than either of those bands did from a commercial stand point.

Also I have to bring up one of the bands you mentioned earlier Pnilip, the Zombies. I am a fan of this band, but someone hear mentioned having one classic album. The Zombies would fall into that category because Odessey and Oracle will always be the album that they most remembered for.

The Small Faces, all music guide list them as and I quote, "The Small Faces were the best English band never to hit it big in America.", laid the foundation for British Alt-rock, also known as Britpop, experimented alot more than most of the bands of the time, had countless hits in the U.K, and in my firm opinon gave rock one of the most underappreciated singers of all time.

Posted by Dude Man on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 20:10pm


"Okay, we get it already! You guys think "Itchyoo Park" is annoying. You don't have to bring it up every 5 seconds"

Relax... I wasn't trying to bring up the annoyance bit again... I was just saying it was their best-known song.

"Also, among musicians it's not thier best known song. Quiet Riot covered "Afterglow(of Your Love)" and "Tin Soldier" with the late, great Randy Rhoads. The Sex Pistols used to cover "Whatcha Gonna Do About It" and "Understanding" live. Great White covered "Afterglow(of Your Love)". "Lazy Sunday" inspired Blur to write thier song "Parklife" and it was also covered by the Libertines. These bands appreciated them for alot more songs than "Itchyoo Park"."--Dude Man

I meant by and large... i.e. the listening public. Maybe you hate John Q. Public, and I can understand that. I don't want John Q. Public to be the deciding factor, but I do think it's somewhat important for the general public to at least have heard of a band if you're going to enshrine them. And the listening public that has heard of the Small Faces know "Itchycoo Park" best.

"I didn't know anything the VU did, but "Heroin" and "Sweet Jane" until you brought up thier other songs. From the Stooges I only knew "I Wanna Be Your Dog" and "Search and Destroy". Also, Philip if you said those bands had an opportunity than why were they still not successful"--Dude Man

Because back then, you had to released your songs as singles in order to have hits. Those groups focused more on being album bands than singles bands.

"and why are they remembered? Influence, like the Small Faces that's the reason. At least the Small Faces had success in the U.K. That's more than either of those bands did from a commercial stand point."

If it makes you feel better, I think an act should have been impactful (if not commercially successful) in both the U.S. and the U.K. in order to be considered, but then, we'd have no Motown groups in the Hall either. But as it is, right or wrong, it's the American charts that matter, be it singles or album charts.

"Also I have to bring up one of the bands you mentioned earlier Pnilip, the Zombies. I am a fan of this band, but someone hear mentioned having one classic album. The Zombies would fall into that category because Odessey and Oracle will always be the album that they most remembered for."--Dude

Valid point. But the Zombies also were bigger in America, and their songs are closer to standards (in other words, better known by the listening public) than anything by the Small Faces. Just how it is.

"The Small Faces, all music guide list them as and I quote, "The Small Faces were the best English band never to hit it big in America.", laid the foundation for British Alt-rock, also known as Britpop, experimented alot more than most of the bands of the time, had countless hits in the U.K, and in my firm opinon gave rock one of the most underappreciated singers of all time."--Dude Man

Again, my distaste for Britpop is probably biasing me. But I will agree with underrated. Maybe when/if Oasis and Blur get in, they'll use their moment to try and pull leverage for Small Faces. We'll see. IMO, no rush.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 20:29pm


I don't see what could be so annoying about Itchycoo Park at all unless you are referring to it's hippy trippy lyrics. I grew up a punk rocker and we had no use for flared trousers and flower power either, but aside from that I don't see how it compares melodically or structurally to utter garbage like Scott McKenzie's "San Francisco" or fluffy tripe like the above referenced Harpers Bizarre tune.

This isn't about whether some individual had a personal negative first impression of a song or not. If the Small Faces are to get into the Hall it will likely be on the "influence and significance to the development and perpetuation of rock and roll" clause. Personally, I think a very good case can be made for this, but individual perceptions will differ based upon the types of bands they appreciate and how much those bands may or may have not been influenced by the work of Marriott, Lane, McLagen, and Jones. And it would seem that this is influenced in large part by one's geographical location. So we'll no doubt continue to disagree.

I heard a rumour that Gene Pitney is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Just sayin'.

Posted by Jazzy on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 20:38pm


"Maybe when/if Oasis and Blur get in, they'll use their moment to try and pull leverage for Small Faces. We'll see. IMO, no rush."

Actually it's Weller who utterly worships Marriott and the Small Faces. The Jam has been eligible for several years now, I think this site give them a better than 50/50 shot of getting in, for what it's worth. (seems a little high to me). The Small Faces most certainly influenced Oasis, and they'll get in, but I can't see that wanker Noel Gallagher pulling leverage for anyone but himself.

Not to give the impression that it's just Brit pop that they influenced, of course, but I believe that was sufficiently covered earlier. The Small Faces were very, very eclectic. (which also sort of requires that their fans have an appreciation for different types of pop music genres.)

Posted by Jazzy on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 20:57pm


Yeah, we've discussed the different styles a little bit... in a strange way, it almost all falls under the "psychedelic rock" umbrella, since part of the psychedlic mindset was experimentation. *rimshot*

Fwiw, I think Gene Pitney deserved his spot in the Hall. Commercially successful, excellent singer/songwriter (helped with that in a big way), and, after straight out blues, probably the template to follow for rock 'n' roll heartbreak songs.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 21:04pm


Okay...forget the fact that "Itchycoo Park" isn't exactly one of my favorites. Small Faces had 2 songs chart in the U.S...the aforementioned tune at No. 16, and "Tin Soldier" at like No. 73, I believe...not exactly stuff of legend. Also, to my knowledge they never toured here (I understand they were supposed to, but their keyboard player had some "legal issues"), and success in the U.S. was very important to most of the British bands in that era. Now, I'm sure that someone my age in the U.K. would have an entirely different perspective, since my understanding is that they were very successful there.

Another thing concerning "Ogden's Nut Gone Flake" was that even though it was considered a "classic", it was nearly impossible to perform live. I remember seeing the round cover and all that, but like a lot of people I knew, didn't pay much attention to it.

A band's success at that time relied heavily on what impact they had in the states, which they just really didn't...and it had very little to do with whether I liked that song or not...

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 05.26.09 @ 22:10pm


There is a small mistake in singles chart position
Itchycoo Park - Highest position: 16 in USA but 3 in UK.

'A band's success at that time relied heavily on what impact they had in the states, which they just really didn't...and it had very little to do with whether I liked that song or not...'
You have to remember that they NEVER toured there and never promoted anything in USA. They never got this chance. It wasn't a case of Ian's "legal issues' their management didn't want to send them to the States because they feared to loose control over the band. Also only three of their singles were actually approved by the band, the rest was chose by managers/record labels. For example 'My mind's eyes' was only a demo tape which they send to Arden and he released it as a single. They were teenagers, unfortunately they didn't have much control in their hands.

Posted by Mojo Pin on Wednesday, 05.27.09 @ 01:39am


*lose
*chosen
sorry guys ;)

Posted by Mojo Pin on Wednesday, 05.27.09 @ 05:10am


Up until now, I had no opinion whatsoever on the Small Faces. I always thought STAY WITH ME was a great song, but apparently were differentiating between the two, and I clearly have missed out on the good end. Up until now I had never heard the Small Faces, even once, in my lifetime. Admittedly, I had never purposely sought them out for anything, so part of that is on me. I have surrendered to the overwhelming logic that I must have missed the greatest thing since Tchaikovsky and dug upsome of their stuff.

Marriott is a fine singer, and I can see why everyone tosses out Spencer Davis Group references. Fact is, I think GIMME SOME LOVIN is one of the most overrated songs that you are allegedly required to like when it comes to classic rock, or you get that funny look like you shouldn't have your own opinion about it. I'll admit, Marriott is better, and I do think the Small Faces are better as a band.

ITCHYKOO PARK is annoying, and sounds psychedelic the way 3rd rate disco, hair metal, and grunge do, i.e. it sucks the big one. This gives psychedelia a bad name. TIN SOLDIER was a pretty good song, so I guess I'm at the 50 yard line on these guys. I don't know what to say or how to vote, so I'll just drop out of the confab you've got going here.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Wednesday, 05.27.09 @ 05:36am


About the geography thing and influence - From an article around the the time (1996) Ray Davies awarded the Ivor Novello to the surviving Small Faces:

It seems any Englishman that picks up a guitar these days, if he's not uttering the words "Small Faces," is uttering "the Kinks" instead. "It's not exactly a mod thing they're celebrating," notes Ray. "It's more to do with English pop, and Small Faces and the Kinks, I suppose, never got that initial praise that they're supposed to have gotten. They're getting picked up by a lot of smart young musicians."

Posted by Padraig on Thursday, 05.28.09 @ 11:07am


The Jam's take on My Mind's Eye
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIr4zoS3FX4

Posted by Mojo Pin on Friday, 05.29.09 @ 14:40pm


"Fact is, I think GIMME SOME LOVIN is one of the most overrated songs that you are allegedly required to like when it comes to classic rock, or you get that funny look like you shouldn't have your own opinion about it."--Cheesecrop

I don't know about liking it, but by standard, I mean a song you should at least be familiar with. I think one of the reasons it's such a standard, too, is because it's an easy song to learn. Playing tuba in high school, I am very familiar with this most repetitive of bass lines. But it's also one of the most famous, up there with "Smoke On The Water," "With Or Without You," and "Stand By Me" in terms of famous bass lines. It's a fairly easy song, but when done right, you can buy back even the harshest of crowds (unless you're in a friggin' honky-tonk bar, like in the Blues Brothers movie. lol.) In terms of pure energy, this is a hard song to top, and those two things have helped make it a standard, imo.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.29.09 @ 17:49pm


I don't know about liking it, but by standard, I mean a song you should at least be familiar with.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.29.09 @ 17:49pm
--------------------------------------------------
I'm not denying that it's not a standard. I just think you don't have to like a song just because it is a standard of some sort.

I love a great deal of Zeppelin's tunes, but I've never thought STAIRWAY was one of their best. It's guaranteed though that if I say that, somebody will instantly go into shock mode over this. Everybody stops thinking and turns communist if you suggest it, even if you honestly like the majority of their stuff - you forgot to like the CORRECT one (gasp!).

Posted by Cheesecrop on Friday, 05.29.09 @ 18:38pm


That's fine. I personally don't care for Aretha's version of "Respect" and I'm not too wild about Marvin's version of "I Heard It Through The Grapevine", but I think we would call those standards too. My point was, the Spencer Davis Group does have a standard. The Small Faces, not so much.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 05.29.09 @ 19:04pm


Ocean Colour Scene And Paul Weller - Song Of A Baker
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-XQvs6qSbM&feature=related
40 years later this song ROCKS!!!!

Posted by Mojo Pin on Saturday, 05.30.09 @ 06:46am


Guess Who's covering Tin Soldier here(bad pun intended).

http://youtube.com/watch?v=oISIAYciNZU

I love the Guess Who, but this is pretty funny.

Posted by Dude Man on Saturday, 05.30.09 @ 10:04am


RE:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=oISIAYciNZU

I'm not sure funny is the word. Frightening might be more like it.

I sort of like the Guess Who, actually, and have always thought Cummings has a great voice, but the band looks and sounds terribly uncomfortable here.

Posted by Padraig on Monday, 06.1.09 @ 22:59pm


Kaiser Chiefs - Lazy Sunday
http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&videoid=51290511

Posted by Mojo Pin on Friday, 06.5.09 @ 06:47am


Of course the Small Faces belong in the R&R HoF. Duh. Why aren't they in? Discrimination against short guys if you ask me. If they were the Tall Faces or the Big Faces instead, they'd have been in ages ago. But they were all 5'3" and no one takes them seriously because of it. Oh, ain't they cute little geezers, like wee hobbits they are....

Scoff if you will, but it's clear Wenner et al think short people got no reason to live. squeak, squeak, squeak

Here's the Libertines doing Lazy Sunday. I quite like it, although I'm not hearing my favorite line about old Bert's lumbago. Speakers suck though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WccCjO7e54

Posted by Jasmine on Friday, 06.5.09 @ 09:26am


I've found on youtube a documentary about Paul Weller. It's called 'PAUL WELLER - Highlights and Hang-Ups'.It's quite long but in this part he's talking about being a mod and about Small Faces . Ha there is even a short interview with Steve who's talking about The Jam :-)
This part is 10 min long so if you want skip the video to ~8:00.
Here's the link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzmOx1a9kM4&feature=channel_page

Posted by Mojo Pin on Friday, 06.5.09 @ 15:05pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkQpZpFLpv4

I don't think I posted this, but this is where Robert Plant ripped-off Steve Marriott. The Small Faces did a reworking of Willie Dixon's "You Need Love" titled "You Need Loving". Plant being a huge Small Faces fan got the idea, basically copy-cated the vocals, and Page wrote a new riff on what would become "Whole Lotta Love".

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 06.19.09 @ 09:25am


Plant's ripping off of all that was Marriott should be obvious to anyone who has ears.

Small Faces were outstanding. More people should get to know their stuff. They were only around for a few years but they did it all from Oliver! to heavy metal and everything in between.

They're my desert island band for sure.

Posted by Abel on Friday, 06.19.09 @ 12:33pm


Exactly they did hard rock, psychedelic pop, proto-punk, proto-metal, blue-eyed soul, set up a blue print for the '90s britpop movement, mod, vaudville, rhythm and blues, British invasion, beat, and were just an incredible band.

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 06.19.09 @ 13:15pm


The Small Faces are one of the few major British Invasion artists left who aren't in the Hall yet (the others being The Hollies, The Moody Blues, The Zombies and The Troggs)

Posted by Keebord on Friday, 06.19.09 @ 13:28pm


The Small Faces should get in first. Perhaps the only reason these guys are even remembered is that Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood were part of the lineup

Posted by Keebord on Wednesday, 07.8.09 @ 16:26pm


Lest anyone have any doubts about the prior statements that Robert Plant's vocals were an attempt to rip off of the superior vocals of the teenaged Steve Marriott's:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrvWFn-Eb7o

eenie meenie minie mo

(At the end is an even younger Steve as the Artful Dodger.)

Posted by Milt on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 10:38am


Influence of this band can be found in Led Zeppelin, The Black Crowes, Blur, The Jam, Oasis, The Sex Pistols, Quiet Riot, Great White, and The Libertines. Ozzy Osbourne listed Marriott as the 4th greatest singer of all-time and Clem Burke(of Blondie) called Marriott the "greatest rock singe". The Small Faces were just an amazing group.

Posted by Dude Man on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 11:00am


Even though I prefer the Small Faces lineup of the group(with Steve Marriott), the Faces certainly do have a good amount of influence too. I suppose it's only fair that if one goes in the other one goes in as well. After all, Rolling Stone uses the same article for the two bands on thier artists section on thier website.

Posted by Dude Man on Sunday, 07.26.09 @ 15:32pm


Sometimes I listen to a Small Faces tune, and I can hear how they influenced Cream.

On another, I can hear them influencing Hendrix.

And I can listen to another and hear how they inspired Led Zeppelin. And the Sex Pistols. And the Clash. And the Jam. And pretty much every Brit Pop band that followed.

Et tu, Robert Plant et al?

So when posters say that they don't think the Small Faces belong in the Hall of Fame because they don't like Itchycoo Park, I want to Itchycoo Puke all over them. Open your ears, expand your horizons, and listen to a body of work that has meant much to rock history. The Small Faces will always be far, far more than the psychedelic pixies you've written them off to be.

Oh, and Don Arden, if you happen to have internet access in Hell and are reading this, please rot in peace.

Posted by Jonesy on Wednesday, 08.26.09 @ 22:20pm


I doubt they were an influence on Hendrix or Cream, but I have learned recently that Alice Cooper was a fan(I'm not saying he was influenced by them though) because he once said, "I like Jet a lot, because they remind me of the Small Faces,"(it was in the article where he compared Wolfmother to Jimi Hendrix and Steppenwolf.)

Posted by Dude Man on Wednesday, 08.26.09 @ 22:57pm


Jimi Hendrix said once that Steve Marriott's guitar solo on "Whatcha Gonna Do About It" was his favourite of all time. See humblepie.net for details. So I wouldn't dismiss the Small Faces having a very direct influence on Hendrix. He did arrive in London in '66, as their career was taking off and it would have been hard to miss them.

Posted by MaryQ on Saturday, 10.3.09 @ 12:46pm


I've heard about the Hendrix comments also. Guitar on Foxy Lady resembles Whatcha Gonna Do About It. Robert Plant very definitely modeled his vocal style after Steve. Ozzy & others have acknowledged that he was "the man."
I love Itchycoo Park, but if that is the only song you are familiar with then you really don't know Small Faces because Itchycoo is very atypical of them -- a brief foray into psychedelic pop. They were a much more r&b, soul-oriented band. Small Faces should be in the Hall not only because they were an awesome 60's band with an incredible vocalist who influenced many others who have ALREADY been inducted but also because they personified the SWINGING SIXTIES! They were cultural and fashion icons who defined the era in the same way that the BEATLES did!!! They were trend-setters, musically and culturally.

Posted by MissMiscellanea on Sunday, 11.1.09 @ 18:51pm


Bob Dylan was big Steve Marriott fan too.

Maybe someone should list the major artists NOT influenced by and/or fans of the Small Faces. To save some time.

And I agree, MissMiscellanea. They were visually stunning (with not a one of them over 5'5"!) and personified mid-60's mod-ness. Young as they were, they seemed to understand the importance of the imagery meshing with the music as if they were one. (a notion the Punks picked up in the 70's) And oh, god, could Marriott belt them out.

They'll probably never be inducted, and although it would be nice for Kenney and Mac, it wouldn't matter a bit to Steve and Ronnie if they were alive. So I guess it shouldn't matter to us. I'm just glad we have the music as it has certainly brightened my life.

Posted by MaryQ on Tuesday, 11.17.09 @ 21:36pm


You guys heard their version of "If I were a Carpenter"...pretty badass

Posted by Jonny on Wednesday, 11.18.09 @ 00:04am


As covers go, The Small Faces "If I Were a Carpenter" is killa. Their version of Hardin's "Red Balloon" is pretty amazing as well. And I recently stumbled upon their version of "You Really Got a Hold on Me", which I'd never heard before. incredible band all around.

Posted by Sami on Wednesday, 11.18.09 @ 08:02am


Need to be in.

Posted by Frank on Friday, 01.22.10 @ 00:47am


"Need to be in."

No. They don't.

Posted by Ralph on Friday, 01.22.10 @ 10:47am


Just watched the new DVD compilation of Small Faces performances. I always liked Green Circles a bit better than Itchycoo Park, as Small Faces psychedelia goes. The slower version sung by Marriott rather than Lane. But I really think of them more as a heavy, blue-eyed R&B band, their experimentation and amusing forays into Cockneyism aside. Tin Soldier, Song of a Baker, Rollin' Over.

The internet seems to be fueling a bit of a cult following in the US. I think people who have heard the Kinks and the Who and the Stones all their lives over and over again are surprised to find another band from that era that was putting out such good material. Sort of like an archeological dig where you stumble into a room full of Rembrandts no one knew existed. And young Marriott was just fantastic.

Posted by Cat on Friday, 04.2.10 @ 11:20am


I landed here when I searched to find out when the Small Faces were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

I'm truly shocked to find out they aren't in it and weren't elected many years ago. What's up with this?

Posted by T. Jameson on Tuesday, 05.11.10 @ 20:35pm


No, they don't. But Small Faces do. I wish The Faces could just posthumously change their name to something else so people will stop confusing the two bands with each other. The Faces were a fine band, but the Small Faces are total legend.

Posted by Little James on Monday, 06.7.10 @ 16:56pm


It's crazy guys have never been nominated. They have got to be the most deserving band that's been eligible the longest that never has had a single nomination. Huge acknowledged influence on so many later groups and artists like the Clash, Pistols, The Jam, Elvis Costello, Squeeze, Oasis, on forward. Like everyone says the lack of American hits must be the reason, but American hits ain't everything, if they were the Monkees would be in already and the Jonas Brothers would be in the queue.

Posted by JimDee on Wednesday, 10.13.10 @ 22:14pm


I think the versatility of the Small Faces actually goes against them. They don't really fit into a box as they experimented with everything; they were just hugely talanted kids in a sweet shop plus they were badly managed. Steve, in particular, did not want to be pigeon-holed and had huge disagreements with management over which songs should be released as singles. He heartily disliked some of their releases. He could see the way music was going in the late 60s and wanted to bring in Peter Frampton as he knew his own guitar playing, although certainly competent and powerful, could not compete with the Jimmy Pages and etc. Unfortunately the other members of the band wouldn't agree and Steve stormed out, for which the others never forgave him.
Steve was a great talent and his vocals were amazing; he could sing anything with never a duff note, plus he had heart and soul and gave his all in live performances. Just listen to Tin Soldier for the real Steve Marriot - gut wrenching in a good way.
The Hollies were always the Hollies,Kinks and Dave Clark Five (yuk!) ditto but the Small Faces did a bit of everything, always brilliantly in my opinion, and Steve Marriot was a mega-talent in a small package. They should be in the HOF, and would be if it were British, but don't hold your breath.

Posted by Claire on Wednesday, 02.23.11 @ 01:48am


Forgot to say that I think a lot of people judge the Small Faces by what Steve became; to misquote someone "an embarrassing sordid speck hovering on the outskirts of the music business". Steve crashed and burned in a spectacular rock-god sort of way and it's probably a bit too close for some people to take.
If he'd had better management,if he'd kept away from the alcohol,ciggies and drugs, if Jimmy Page hadn't been warned off, if Mick Jagger hadn't been threatened by his talent, if his band members hadn't rejected Peter Frampton, if his 'old lady' hadn't left him, if Peter Frampton hadn't left him, if he'd had more confidence in his talents IF IF IF. Perhaps if he had died young like Jim Morrison..........

Posted by claire on Wednesday, 02.23.11 @ 02:29am


I agree with much of what Clair says above. So many "ifs" with the Small Faces. They were clearly improperly managed, and I agree that their refusal to be type cast has often worked against them. To some they are an R&B band, to others a pop band, still others a psychedelic band, then there is the Oliver-inspired cockney stage material....on and on it goes. It's hard to believe they only existed for 3 years.

On the other hand, I think that's a part of what makes them so appealing to this day. There was nothing boring about the Small Faces and they didn't stand still long enough to get stuck in any box. And at a time when the Stones and Who were becoming far better live bands, with their long drum and guitar solos and impressive stage shows, the Small Faces stayed behind. And wrote better songs.

And no offense to any Humble Pie fans, but HP really was Steve Marriott in tragic decline. The dropping of Ronnie Lane in favor of Peter Frampton itself was a sign that he was not well mentally. And his voice, while always strong, lost it's magical quality to drugs and alcohol while he was with HP. I don't think this directly works against the Small Faces, although I do think Steve's personal legacy was tarnished by it. Legacy-wise, he'd have been better off retiring to the countryside or producing musicals with Lionel Bart.

In the end, I don't think it's possible for the Small Faces to really be forgotten. They were too good. Just try playing one of their classics to a captive (as on a long drive kind of captive) 13, 17 or even 70 year old today and they are assurred a new fan or three. And what has not been forgotten after half a century will eventually be honored. Or so we Small Faces fans can hope.

Posted by Bob Arroyo on Monday, 03.14.11 @ 00:40am


The Small Faces

Steve Marriott
Ian McLagan
Ronnie Lane
Kenney Jones
Jimmy McCulloch
Rick Wills
Jimmy Winston

The Faces

Rod Stewart
Ron Wood
Ian McLagan
Ronnie Lane
Kenney Jones
Glen Matlock
Tetsu Yamauchi

The Small Faces / The Faces

Ian McLagan
Ronnie Lane
Kenney Jones

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 08.24.11 @ 09:55am


The Small Faces

Steve Marriott
Ian McLagan
Ronnie Lane
Kenney Jones
Jimmy McCulloch
Rick Wills
Jimmy Winston

The Faces

Rod Stewart
Ron Wood
Ian McLagan
Ronnie Lane
Kenney Jones
Glen Matlock
Tetsu Yamauchi

The Small Faces / The Faces

Ian McLagan
Ronnie Lane
Kenney Jones

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 08.24.11 @ 09:55am


"Stay With Me" is NOT an Essential Small Faces song. It's not a Small Faces song at all.

Posted by Oliver J. on Sunday, 09.18.11 @ 12:04pm


The Small Faces / The Faces

Steve Marriott
Ian McLagan
Ronnie Lane
Kenney Jones
Jimmy McCulloch
Rick Wills
Jimmy Winston
Rod Stewart
Ron Wood
Glen Matlock
Tetsu Yamauchi

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 08:05am


Finally a nomination!

What's with the /Faces thing though? The Faces were not the Small Faces and it's the Small Faces who should be inducted, not the Faces. Rod Stewart should not be standing on a stage accepting an honor that belongs solely to Marriott, Lane, McLagan and Jones.

Posted by Oliver J. on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 14:54pm


They are being nominated as The Small Faces/The Faces because The Faces were a continuation of The Small Faces. Three members of The Small Faces were also members of The Faces: Ian McLagan, Ronnie Lane and Kenney Jones. I guess the Rock Hall really wants to give Ron Wood and Rod Stewart second inductions. There is a possibility that The Small Faces/The Faces will join The Grateful Dead and Parliament-Funkadelic as the only bands with more than 9 members each inducted.

I think this answers the question as to how Joy Division and New Order will be nominated and inducted. It will indeed be Joy Division/New Order.

Now the question is why didn't the Rock Hall nominate and induct Jefferson Airplane as Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship?

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 17:27pm


When you post something on the The Small Faces/The Faces page, it shows up as only The Small Faces on the main page. Did you do that intentionally? Can it be changed? Do you plan on closing The Faces page after they are inducted as The Small Faces/The Faces?

Can you call the link The_Small_Faces_Faces

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 17:44pm


"They are being nominated as The Small Faces/The Faces because The Faces were a continuation of The Small Faces."

No, they weren't. Have you actually listened to the music of the two bands? Entirely different music fronted by different men. And are you aware that all members of both bands considered them to be entirely separate bands despite some crossover personnel? Ian McLagan said today it's "insulting" for the two bands to be lumped together, and it is.

Small Faces should have been in ages ago. They were hugely influential despite the lack of exposure in the US. Elvis Costello once said he was afraid his first album would end up sounding like the Small Faces played backwards because he knew their music backwards and forwards when he was a kid. He's just one of many 70's, 80's and 90's greats who cite the Small Faces as a huge influence.

Faces, on the other hand, were fun, but nothing special in the grand scheme. And they are certainly not deserving of nomination simply because some record company 42 years ago wanted to capitalize on the Small Faces good name.

Posted by Susie Q on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 18:59pm


I guess then the Rock Hall didn't want to have to induct Ian McLagan, Ronnie Lane and Kenney Jones twice, and they really wanted to induct Ron Wood and Rod Stewart again.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 20:05pm


Small Faces and Faces keyboardist Ian McLagan told Billboard.com that "it's about bloody time" his bands were nominated but said he felt that grouping the two together was "a bit insulting. If we have to go in as a combo, that's not right. It's a dollar short and many years too late -- but I'll take it." Two of the Faces are already in the Rock Hall: Rod Stewart as a solo artist; and Ron Wood as part of the Rolling Stones. Drummer Kenney Jones was briefly in the Who but was not inducted with them in 1990.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 21:27pm


Congrats? RT @Ian_McLagan: Small Faces and Faces are two different bands, but the Rock'n'Roll Hall of Fame are shamefully unaware of this. about 3 hours ago

I think the Rock Hall is aware, but they just don't care.

My question is, what will the trophies read for those who were only members of The Small Faces, and what will the trophies read for those who were only members of Faces? Will all the trophies say The Small Faces/The Faces, or will the Rock Hall actually make trophies that only say The Small Faces for the members who were only in Small Faces, and trophies that say The Faces for the members who were only in The Faces?

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 22:05pm


The Hall must be aware they are different bands.

I haven't seen a statement from drummer Kenney Jones, but he's repeatedly made his feelings known about the Small Faces vs. The Faces. And it's his opinion that the Small Faces were by far the better, more innovative and all around more important band.

Could this just be a way to snub the great Steve Marriott? Some say Jann Wenner had personal issues with Steve. If so, this could be a back door way of letting the Small Faces (who are gaining more recognition with each passing year) into the Hall while focusing attention on Stewart (who being alive would presumably show up at the ceremony) rather than Marriott.

If by chance they do get inducted as Small Faces/Faces, it would be nice if Stewart and Wood stepped back and let the Small ones have their well deserved night.

"There Are But Four Small Faces"

Posted by Susie Q on Tuesday, 09.27.11 @ 23:14pm


They are being nominated as The Small Faces/The Faces, but I bet once they are inducted the Rock Hall will list them as The (Small) Faces on their website, or maybe not.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.28.11 @ 09:59am


It's clear what the surviving Small Faces and their fans think of it, but I'd be interested in hearing what Faces fans think of the merging of the two different bands. However, they seem to be a little harder to find. ;)

Yes, 3/5ths of the Faces had previously been in the Small Faces, but it's dishonest to bill them as the same band. Different front men, entirely different type of music and vibe, and the Small Faces material was mostly written by the songwriting team of Marriott/Lane with Marriott writing most of the hits. The Small Faces were a major influence on many later British artists. The Faces were really just Rod Stewart's backing band.

It does seem disrespectful to Steve Marriott especially, but it could be that the Hall thinks the Small Faces just aren't well known enough in the US so they want to throw in Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood and material like Stay With Me to add credibility to the potential induction for an American audience.

One thing I think is certain, if the Small Faces had never existed and the Faces formed entirely independent of them, they (the Faces) would never even be nominated.

A question - would original Small Faces keyboardist Jimmy Winston be inducted?

Posted by londonsburning on Wednesday, 09.28.11 @ 10:30am


Is it possible that maybe the Rock Hall nominated them as The Small Faces/The Faces, but they will induct them separately, and we'll have 6 instead of 5 inductees next year? It could be what the Rock Hall's plan is. I'm going to email them and tell them to do it that way. If they nominated Wanda Jackson in the main performers category and then inducted her as an early influence, I think they could nominate The Small Faces/The Faces together and then induct them separately. Ian McLagan, Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones will join Stephen Stills as the only inductees to be inducted twice in the same year. We'll get two separate induction speeches and two performances.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.28.11 @ 20:47pm


The Small Faces/The Faces has to be the most ridiculous nomination in the history of the R&RHoF, even more ridiculous than Conway Twitty's nomination. That assessment has nothing to do with their worthiness, though. The Small Faces, featuring Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan and Kenney Jones, were a great, influential band that straddled the subgenres of folk rock and psychedelia featuring the best work that Steve Marriott has ever done. The Faces, featuring Rod Stewart, Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan, Ron Wood and Kenney Jones, were a great, influential, alcohol-fueled pub rock band featuring some of the best work Rod Stewart has ever done. Yes, they share three members, but they were two entirely different bands, and just because you liked one didn't mean you liked the other.

The only reasons to mash the Small Faces/the Faces together are (1) you didn't want to load up the Clyde McPhatter Club with Lane, McLagan and Jones, even though you're guaranteed to add Stewart and Wood by nominating the Faces that Stewart and Wood will be added, so what's the problem? (2) you couldn't get the nominators to agree on one or the other so you mashed them both together and it worked, (3) you were afraid the voters wouldn't vote in one or the other so you're gonna try inducting them both at the same time (4) the nominators aren't familiar with the work of each band and think that just because they both share three members and have similar names that the two bands are essentially the same when in essence you actually have two completely different bands. If that last reason were the case, those nominators need to be ejected from the committee for gross ignorance.

This is not another case of Parliament and Funkadelic, where although there were some differences, the lines between the two acts were constantly blurred. Yes, these two acts should be nominated, but because they are so different musically speaking, they should be nominated separately, not together.

Posted by Charles Crossley Jr on Wednesday, 09.28.11 @ 20:54pm


Interesting point about the induction performance.

Usually, a band like the Small Faces (or the Faces) would get one tune shown on the televised version of the ceremony.

So how would this be handled? Does Rod Stewart sing Itchycoo Park? Or do they go with a Faces song like Stay With Me and pretend the phenomenal Steve Marriott never existed? Or maybe a drunken (chased with a bit of acid) mash up sing-a-long of All or Nothing and Cindy Incidentally?

It's a mess no matter how you look at it.

Posted by Susie Q on Wednesday, 09.28.11 @ 22:49pm


Susie Q, don't count your chickens before they hatch.

Posted by Paul in KY on Thursday, 09.29.11 @ 07:12am


Hypothetical questions, Paul, asked primarily illustrate the absurdity of merging two different bands for nomination.

Although I would put their odds of making it in this round at about 40 - 50%. It's probably the best chance they'll get.

Posted by Susie Q on Thursday, 09.29.11 @ 11:06am


Susie, I was assuming you might want them in (I don't) & that you'd be jinxing yourself.

Happened to me a couple of years back when War was up. I was sooo sure they were going in, and then bupkis.

Now I predict who the entrants would be by applying the Costanza Rule: Those who I would put in, will not get in.

Posted by Paul in KY on Thursday, 09.29.11 @ 12:39pm


I can't jinx them, Paul. What will happen will happen. As the Small Faces once sang themselves, "What becomes of me is meant to be, so I'll just groove along quite naturally."

Posted by Susie Q on Thursday, 09.29.11 @ 13:00pm


Wait a minute, if the Rock Hall nominated them as The Small Faces/The Faces, then why the hell didn't the Rock Hall nominate and induct Jefferson Airplane as Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship?

I bet when they announced this joint nomination, the members of Jefferson Starship got a little upset that they weren't included with Jefferson Airplane. (They can commiserate with the Miracles.)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 10.3.11 @ 05:50am


Actually,there is a precedent of sorts to Small Faces/Faces and that goes back to the third year of the HoF.

The Drifters were two different groups from two different eras, both groups were on the same label, but again, two different groups from two diferent eras, yet key members of both groups are in the HoF together.

The Drifters

Clyde McPhatter, Ben E. King, Rudy Lewis, Johnny Moore, Bill Pinkney, Charlie Thomas, Gerhart Thrasher

Posted by Roy on Monday, 10.3.11 @ 21:01pm


Charles, I think reason #3 is the most likely.

IMO, the addition of the Small era was an afterthought. I know this will really steam the fans of the Small Faces, but from where I sit, the powers-that-be only saw two possibilities: nominate Faces and include the Small era as part of it, or nominate Faces alone, without the Small. I don't believe they ever had any intention of nominating the Small Faces without the Rod Stewart era.

Something else to chew on: the first hit album from the Rod Stewart-led band was credited to "Small Faces". So it seems that they did indeed try to be masters of reinvention, keeping the same name, and then later just dropped the Small.

Van Hagar anyone?

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 10.9.11 @ 15:30pm


"Something else to chew on: the first hit album from the Rod Stewart-led band was credited to "Small Faces". So it seems that they did indeed try to be masters of reinvention, keeping the same name, and then later just dropped the Small."

This is simply not accurate. The Faces portion of the name was kept at the insistence of their record company. The band wanted an entirely new name. The Rod Stewart "Small Faces" album was only released as such in the US and it was done in error. The band had nothing to do with it.

"IMO, the addition of the Small era was an afterthought. I know this will really steam the fans of the Small Faces, but from where I sit, the powers-that-be only saw two possibilities: nominate Faces and include the Small era as part of it, or nominate Faces alone, without the Small. I don't believe they ever had any intention of nominating the Small Faces without the Rod Stewart era."

What exactly was innovative or influential about the Faces? Above are the names of many important artists who have said the Small Faces were a big influence on them. You won't find many such claims about the Faces. They were a talented, but basically a drunken, good time party band.

And what about the hits and longevity? Let's do a full track listing:

First Step

1."Wicked Messenger" (Bob Dylan) - 4:05
2."Devotion" (Ronnie Lane) - 4:54
3."Shake Shudder Shiver" (Lane, Ronnie Wood) - 3:14
4."Stone" (Lane) - 5:38
5."Around The Plynth" (Rod Stewart, Wood) - 5:56
6."Flying" (Lane, Stewart, Wood) - 4:15
7."Pineapple and the Monkey" (Wood) - 4:23
8."Nobody Knows" (Lane, Wood) - 4:05
9."Looking Out The Window" (Kenney Jones, Ian McLagan) - 4:59
10."Three Button Hand Me Down" (McLagan, Stewart) - 5:44

Long Player

1."Bad 'n' Ruin" (Ian McLagan, Rod Stewart) - 5:24
2."Tell Everyone" (Ronnie Lane) - 4:18
3."Sweet Lady Mary" (Lane, Stewart, Ronnie Wood) - 5:49
4."Richmond" (Lane) - 3:04
5."Maybe I'm Amazed" (Paul McCartney) - 5:53
6."Had Me a Real Good Time" (Lane, Stewart, Wood) - 5:51
7."On the Beach" (Lane, Wood) - 4:15
8."I Feel So Good" (Big Bill Broonzy) - 8:49
9."Jerusalem" (Traditional, arr. Wood) - 1:53

A Nod's as Good as a Wink

1."Miss Judy's Farm" (Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood) – 3:42
2."You're So Rude" (Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan) – 3:46
3."Love Lives Here" (Lane, Stewart, Wood) – 3:09
4."Last Orders Please" (Lane) – 2:38
5."Stay with Me" (Stewart, Wood) – 4:42
6."Debris" (Lane) – 4:39
7."Memphis, Tennessee" (incorrectly titled on original U.S. pressings of the album as simply "Memphis") (Chuck Berry) – 5:31
8."Too Bad" (Stewart, Wood) – 3:16
9."That's All You Need" (Stewart, Wood) – 5:05

Ooh La La

Silicone Grown" (Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood) - 3:05
2."Cindy Incidentally" (Ian McLagan, Stewart, Wood) - 2:37
3."Flags and Banners" (Ronnie Lane, Stewart) - 2:00
4."My Fault" (McLagan, Stewart, Wood) - 3:05
5."Borstal Boys" (McLagan, Stewart, Wood) - 2:52
6."Fly in the Ointment" (Kenney Jones, Lane, McLagan, Wood) - 3:49
7."If I'm on the Late Side" (Lane, Stewart) - 2:36
8."Glad and Sorry" (Lane) - 3:04
9."Just Another Honky" (Lane) - 3:32
10."Ooh La La" (Lane, Wood) - 3:30

Coast To Coast

1."It's All Over Now" (Bobby Womack, Shirley Womack) - 4:38
2."Cut Across Shorty" (Wayne Walker, Marijohn Wilkin) - 3:45
3."Too Bad" (R. Stewart-R. Wood) / "Every Picture Tells A Story" (Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood) - 7:34
4."Angel" (Jimi Hendrix) - 4:28
5."Stay With Me" (Stewart, Wood) - 4:50
6."I Wish It Would Rain" (Roger Penzabene, Barrett Strong, Norman Whitfield) - 4:20
7."I'd Rather Go Blind" (Billy Foster, Ellington Jordan) - 5:55
8."Borstal Boys" (Ian McLagan, Stewart, Wood) / "Amazing Grace" (Traditional, arr. D. Throat) - 9:52
9."Jealous Guy" (John Lennon) - 4:25

Covers aside, most people today would only recognize Stay With Me and perhaps Every Picture Tells a Story. I love Debris, but it's not at the top of too many playlists.

I think it's clear you have it backwards. The Small Faces belong in the Hall of Fame (musical excellence and their influential contributions to the development and perpetuation of rock and roll) but because of their low level of exposure in the US, tossing in the Faces, who were fronted by the megastar (and already inducted) Rod Stewart, makes it easier for the Hall to deal with a potential induction ceremony. Rod has conveniently even gone so far as to say he'd finally reunite with the Faces just for the occasion.

Posted by londonsburning on Wednesday, 10.12.11 @ 12:59pm


"Covers aside, most people today would only recognize Stay With Me and perhaps Every Picture Tells a Story. I love Debris, but it's not at the top of too many playlists."--londonsburning

Yes, and most people would only recognize "Itchycoo Park" from the Small era. It's about even in those terms. There are songs I like by the Small Faces (Afterglow, Here Comes The Nice), but those songs aren't topping playlists either.


"I think it's clear you have it backwards. The Small Faces belong in the Hall of Fame (musical excellence and their influential contributions to the development and perpetuation of rock and roll) but because of their low level of exposure in the US, tossing in the Faces, who were fronted by the megastar (and already inducted) Rod Stewart, makes it easier for the Hall to deal with a potential induction ceremony. Rod has conveniently even gone so far as to say he'd finally reunite with the Faces just for the occasion."--londonsburning

No lb, I don't have it backwards, and I can say this confidently for three reasons: one, the Hall's always had the affinity/love affair with Stewart, electing him to induction before it was 25 years after his first major hit as a soloist "Maggie Mae" (at least in the States). Two, I don't know how long you've been coming to this site, but before their joint nomination, the Small Faces and Faces had their own separate pages here. While separated, it was discovered by FRL that Faces had been "Previously Considered", which as well as I understand is equivalent to being a semi-finalist for the final Nominees list. The Small Faces, however, had never been considered for nomination, at least never that seriously. Three, "innovation and influence," as highly prized as they are for being relatively objective standards, are not the ultimate guidance principle by which an artist is judged. According to NomCom members, it's "Unquestionable Musical Excellence"... and in that regard, the NomCom thoroughly prizes the bluesier style of Faces more than the experimental mod stylings of the Small Faces. Small Faces could not have gotten nomination on their own. They're there on the coattails of the Rod Stewart band.

Posted by Philip on Wednesday, 10.12.11 @ 17:39pm


"Small Faces could not have gotten nomination on their own. They're there on the coattails of the Rod Stewart band."

Nonsense. What coattails? And why not answer my questions about the Faces lack of hits and influence on other bands?

"Yes, and most people would only recognize "Itchycoo Park" from the Small era. It's about even in those terms."

Most AMERICANS only know Itchycoo Park. The influence the Small Faces had on many great British artists is well documented, along with the slew of hits they had. The Small Faces brilliant concept album Ogden's Nut Gone Flake alone blows every one of those Faces albums off the planet. And who have the Faces influenced? Not even by a long shot.

I've read out here long enough to know there were separate pages for the two different bands until AFTER the Hall made their announcement. And that there was a great deal of commentary and interest in the Small Faces with hardly any addressing the Faces. And before you insist again that they one and the same, that is very much the minority opinion amongst people well familiar with both bands. The members themselves consider them to be entirely seperate.

Sounds like you took a position early on that the Small Faces will never be inducted and now that it's a decent possibility, you seem to be trying very hard to make it appear you weren't wrong. Going so far as to state untrue things about the rationale behind the naming of the Faces.

The Hall knows that the British see it essentially as The American Hall of Fame. And they know that many consider the Small Faces, as Mick Jones from the Clash has said, one of the "Big Five" British bands of the 60's (the other being the Beatles, the Who, the Kinks, and the Stones), and continuing to exclude the SFs simply backs up that perception. They also know most Americans aren't familiar with them, but they know Stewart (the solo artist) well. Solution? Merge the bands for the purposes of induction.

If the Hall really thought the Faces were worthy of induction they needn't have included the Small Faces at all. Anyone who knows the bands well knows they are not the same band. So if there is any coattail riding here, it's the Faces riding those of the Small Faces.

Posted by londonsburning on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 16:03pm


"'Big Five" British bands of the 60's (the other being the Beatles, the Who, the Kinks, and the Stones)" - londonsburning

The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Kinks and the Who are the undisputed "Big Four" but I think the Animals and the Yardbirds both have a bigger claim to being part of the "Big Five" than the Small Faces, and that's not to dump on the Small Faces, just sayin.' Hey, maybe even the Spencer Davis Group or the Hollies have a better claim than the Small Faces. Maybe not in the UK, but definitely in the US.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 16:12pm


Final proof, Philip, just take a gander at the offical Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's induction page.

Picture: Small Faces

Song List: Tin Soldier, All or Nothing, Whatcha Gonna Do About It, Itchycoo Park. ALL Small Faces songs.

Not a single Faces song mentioned.

http://rockhall.com/inductees/nominees/the-small-faces-the-faces/

Posted by londonsburning on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 16:14pm


The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Kinks and the Who are the undisputed "Big Four" but I think the Animals and the Yardbirds both have a bigger claim to being part of the "Big Five" than the Small Faces, and that's not to dump on the Small Faces, just sayin.' Hey, maybe even the Spencer Davis Group or the Hollies have a better claim than the Small Faces. Maybe not in the UK, but definitely in the US.
Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 16:12pm

Oh and the Zombies of course. They're even more important than the Hollies and the Spencer Davis Group.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 16:15pm


Tahvo - Please reread my comment about the Big 5 in it's proper context. I was specifically quoting Mick Jones of the Clash who listed the Small Faces in the Big 5, and indicating that many British fans of the era and later artists would agree with him. And that many Brits consider the Hall to have a heavy American bias and consider illegitimate.

I've acknowledged the Small Faces are relatively unknown in the US. (However, the internet and youtube have steadily increased their exposure in recent years.)

Posted by londonsburning on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 17:03pm


london,

You want hits? Small Faces had the biggest with Itchycoo Park, but Faces had more on the Hot 100, by a score of 3-2. Throw in a Bubbling Under for the Small, and you've got a score of 3-3. Dead even.

Second, and maybe the page has changed, but when you read the actual BIO page of the Small Faces/Faces, it only lists Faces songs. Not a single Small one.

If you're still dismissing my opinion as being Americentric, than answer my reversal of your previous question: other than Itchycoo Park, which songs are still getting airplay on classic rock and oldies stations, and how often? I'd bet it's about the same as Faces songs that are getting played other than "Stay With Me."

And those coattails are the coattails of the Hall's affinity for Rod Stewart. As I said, Faces were on the shortlist, the Small Faces never were until now. That's just a fact.

And I'm sorry, but arguing albums is next to useless. I don't give much credence to the "brilliance of albums" argument unless just about every single one of those songs is venerated. I've told this story before, and I think it still makes a point: I brought Sgt. Pepper's into work one night to listen to, and a co-worker who said he loved the album later told me he didn't know that there was a reprise to Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. By contrast, I will always extol The Joshua Tree as a great album because other than "Exit" and "Bullet The Blue Sky", I love every single song from it, and those two I don't outright love I think are alright. So unless there's praise for almost every single song on Ogden's Nut Flake, hailing it means nothing. An album is not greater than the sum of its songs, even in concept albums where the idea is to string a theme through it.

In all honestly, I don't care enough about either band. When I first posted on this page, it was mainly about how annoying "Itchycoo Park" was, and it still is to me. I don't think either band by itself is important enough to merit induction on its own. My statement about the Small included is based on the facts that a) Faces have actually been Previously Considered b) the Small Faces have not, c) when the nominations were announced, the bio page for them only listed Faces songs, and d) the powers-that-be are heavily prejudiced towards blues-fused music when describing "unquestionable musical excellence", which greatly favors Faces. And no matter how much you rant and rave about "innovation and influence", those are simply not the end-all be-all criteria for the NomCom. They're not even the most important ones. From an objective standpoint that looks at how the Rock Hall has operated in the past and how it does now, I don't see how, barring the current page on the Rock Hall site, you could say they weren't thinking primarily Faces. Add to that, that inducting Faces is the only possible Clyde McPhatter Club act on the ballot this year, and it just seems that the Small Faces come off as more of an afterthought.

I understand you feel that the joint nomination is a slight to both acts. Mathematically speaking, it's about like saying 7+9=3 (who is 7 and who's 9 truly does not interest me). I personally don't care a whole lot for either band. Faces are cookie-cutter blues-rock in my opinion, and the Small Faces' more conventional songs sound like typical British pop of the late 60's and their experimental stuff sounds like haphazard, and possibly stoned-off-ass-induced, production of random sounds, like a nine year-old banging randomly on a piano saying they're playing "Jibby-Jabby-Jo". I suspect that's just the cultural difference between the shores: one country's birthday song is another's ditty about unrequited love, and one nation's silly and nonsensical is another's experimental.

As I've said elsewhere, induct them separately or together, makes me no nevermind. Just let there be peace about the whole thing.

P.S. If you think the record company's insistence on keeping the name of the first Rod-era album unchanged negates the argument, think again. Record company interference is exactly why the Drifters were inducted as one, and not the Drifters and the Five Crowns separately.

Posted by Philip on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 17:32pm


"Tahvo - Please reread my comment about the Big 5 in it's proper context."

Alright, fair enough.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 18:28pm


Philip, what mostly negates the argument that they are the same band is the band members all considered them to be 2 different bands. Not only did they create entirely different music, Steve Marriott was not just the frontman, he was the primary songwriter. He was not in the Faces. And Rod Stewart, the most visible member of the Faces was not in the Small Faces. Nor was Ronnie Wood.

As for your claim that this is really mostly, if not all, about the Faces, how can you dismiss what is currently on the R&RHOF site as being irrelvant? You say that it's really the Faces driving the nomination, yet the induction page only has a photo of the 4 Small Faces and only provides samples of Small Faces songs. It therefore seems that it's the Faces that are being tagged along and londonburning's theory about the reason for this may be right.

Posted by Susie Q on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 19:07pm


If the Small Faces really did influence the Clash, I'd say that is a major thing to consider; however, I don't hear much crossover from their sound to the Clash's, but I'm always willing to give it another listen. Otherwise, I'd also say that Mick is personally propping up his personal fandom of the Small Faces. From an objective standpoint, there are other groups that have much more claim to the title, both in the US and the UK: the Animals, the Yardbirds, Cream, the Zombies, the DC5..., I'd put the Small Faces right to that claim on the as Freddie And The Dreamers... not that they were similar bands, but that their claim is about as big.

Posted by Philip on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 19:08pm


I think you just live in your own little bubble, Philip. If something isn't in it, it doesn't exist. Objective standpoint, my foot.

I'm not going to waste my time listing all of the major artists who were influenced by the Small Faces as this has already been done in many of the posts above. But I'm sure it won't take you much time to list those influenced by Freddie and the Dreamers, so if you have half a second, perhaps you could provide them?

I did google the Mick Jones "big five" comment, and he did indeed include the Small Faces as number 5.

"Jones said, "I grew up in a really exciting times with the big five beat bands - The Beatles, The Stones, The Who, The Kinks and The Small Faces - and they made me want to be in a band. They lived how I wanted to live."

Oh, what the hell - here's an Elvis Costello quote, he's talking about his first couple of albums:

"A lot of the things we borrowed were from things I'd been passionate about some time earlier, so I could look back at them affectionately. For instance I knew all the Small Faces' records backwards when I was 13, but I didn't have the occasion or the ability or the platform to use what I'd learned from them until I was 23."

Still not going to address the issue of the Hall of Fame induction page being pretty much devoted to the Small Faces and not the Faces, huh?

Posted by Susie Q on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 22:29pm


We know what Ian McLagan thinks about the ridiculous merging of the two bands, but here's an older quote from drummer Kenney Jones about the Small Faces vs. The Faces.

"The best band and most creative one was the Small Faces. I still listen to the Small Faces to this day and it always brings a smile to my face and now I’ve become a Small Faces fan. I look at it from the outside looking in. The Faces were fun, a party band. We all loved it but it wasn’t creative. There were no really great songs."

"There were no really great songs", says a founding member of Faces about the Faces. And yet Philip still thinks he knows better.

Posted by Susie Q on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 22:48pm


We know what Ian McLagan thinks about the ridiculous merging of the two bands, but here's an older quote from drummer Kenney Jones about the Small Faces vs. The Faces.

"The best band and most creative one was the Small Faces. I still listen to the Small Faces to this day and it always brings a smile to my face and now I’ve become a Small Faces fan. I look at it from the outside looking in. The Faces were fun, a party band. We all loved it but it wasn’t creative. There were no really great songs."

"There were no really great songs", says a founding member of Faces about the Faces. And yet Philip still thinks he knows better.

Posted by Susie Q on Thursday, 10.13.11 @ 22:53pm


G'sus, no need to make this so personal. It's nice to have a healthy discussion but c'mon, there's no need for this one-upmanship.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 04:26am


Susie Q, yes, I am being objective, or at least trying to be. I have copy/pasted the last paragraph. The first three things listed are facts, point C refers to the actual text of the bio. Point D is not as factual, but is reasonable conjecture given that bluesier artists have an easier time getting nominated and inducted than the more experimental artists, and by Wenner's affirmation that rock'n'roll is "the music of the Black man". That tells me that the powers-that-be prefer bluesier musicians. Here is what I said:

My statement about the Small included is based on the facts that a) Faces have actually been Previously Considered b) the Small Faces have not, c) when the nominations were announced, the bio page for them only listed Faces songs, and d) the powers-that-be are heavily prejudiced towards blues-fused music when describing "unquestionable musical excellence", which greatly favors Faces. And no matter how much you rant and rave about "innovation and influence", those are simply not the end-all be-all criteria for the NomCom.

As far as the Small Faces page having had more activity, that's primarily because of the argument that broke out when I said I thought "Itchycoo Park" was a horrible song. I still think that. And the inflammatory response and counter-response has been the result. That's why. If anybody'd had said anything remotely hateful about Faces, you'd probably have wound up with the same thing. Number of comments? Really? A lot of the Real Hall Of Famers have little to no comments on their pages, and no one would say the Small Faces are more worthy than those guys. In short, disagreement fuels the fire.

Why only a Small Faces photo does not interest me. Maybe they simply couldn't find a good photo of Faces together. Or maybe they wanted to show the members who were not yet inducted, as both Stewart and Wood already have been. As far as the clips, copyright issues and other external matters can be quite effective, too, you know. It's far more telling, imo, what the powers-that-be at the Hall&Foundation think, that the text bio only mentions "Stay With Me" and "Ooh La La" as the important songs, both of which are Faces songs. Have you no answer for that?

If the band members considers them two different bands, then fine, whatever. Personally, I think that's their own egos allowing them to delude themselves. I believe it is entirely possible for a band to change a member or two, go in a stylistically different direction, and still be the same band. As I said elsewhere, normally we'd call that being "masters of re-invention". Had their been no personnel changes, it'd be no discussion at all.

I agree that Faces are not a great band, but neither are the Small Faces. Their influence on the Clash and Elvis Costello And The Attractions and Oasis are all good arguments, but they would be better if you could actually hear influences of the Small Faces in their music. Instead, the Clash sound more influenced by the Sex Pistols and the New York Dolls; Oasis sounds more like a Beatles-driven band, and Elvis Costello And The Attractions...well okay, their brand of weirdness is not too far fetched from the Small Faces', but given that Costello actually pushed hard for Wanda Jackson and not nearly as hard, if at all, for the Small Faces tells me that the Small Faces were lower on the totem pole of his influences. The Jam, okay, but the Jam were never the hottest ticket item either, though they had their day in the sun.

As for Kenney Jones, I wouldn't tout that too highly. In some rock circles, he's affectionately known as the guy that killed the Who. Personally, I think "Pool Hall Richard" easily is better than almost anything the Small Faces put out, but yeah, it wasn't creative. It was straight-forward, blues-infused rock'n'roll, which is what the Wenner crowd prefers.

I'm not as closed-minded as you make me out to be. I am willing to entertain the possibility it's the other way around, but given the points I've listed, and again knowing of the Hall's love affair with the bad-haired Stewart, I would say I present a decent argument too.

Maybe both factions have NomCom members too, and that was a compromise between them. Maybe they feel that the Small Faces have the influence and innovation while the Faces have the unquestionable musical excellence, defined by the parameters they have traditionally defined it. Whatever. I still say, put together, it's not as deserving as at least five other acts on the ballot. And I hope they don't make it if for no other reason than it will give the NomCom a chance to try again and nominate them separately, just so there can be peace.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 14:53pm


LOL, Tahvo, but I think Philip may have deliberately been trying to start a flame war equating the mighty Small Faces to Freddie and the Dreamers. Arent' they the band that had a goofy dance they did? I can't remember much else about them.

I hadn't seen the Elvis Costello quote about the Small Faces before. Tx, Susie Q.

Posted by londonsburning on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 14:55pm


LOL, Tahvo, but I think Philip may have deliberately been trying to start a flame war equating the mighty Small Faces to Freddie and the Dreamers. Arent' they the band that had a goofy dance they did? I can't remember much else about them.

I hadn't seen the Elvis Costello quote about the Small Faces before. Tx, Susie Q.

Posted by londonsburning on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 14:57pm


Freddie and the Dreamers??? Man I LOVE those guys!! Right up there with Billy J Kramer and the Dakotas in terms of Hall of Fame worthiness for sure, I'm telling you now!!!

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 15:01pm


london, I'm not trying to start a flame war, I promise you. I compared Small Faces to Freddie And The Dreamers because they both have a certain 'quirkiness' about them. Of course, in the case of F&tD, that quirkiness stems more from a nerdy image, and the Small Faces quirkiness is more of a "are they on drugs?" kind of thing. I still hear "The Universal" and think "WTF?"... "Donkey Rides Penny A Stick".... again, this may be a cultural thing, but it's hard to take any song with "donkey" in the title all that seriously. Not that I dismissed the song on title alone, but after I heard it, I thought "the fact that 'donkey' was in the title should have been an indicator."

Overall, I hear the Small Faces and think mostly typical 60's British pop.... Lazy Sunday, Here Comes The Nice... they call to mind strolling through the fair while a Dick Van Dyke "Mary Poppins" cockney bad accent type of barker is inviting me to knock the milk bottles off the shelf or something. Afterglow is a good song, but it's really more the exception than the rule.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 15:05pm


Sorry, that's Penny A Glass, not Penny A Stick, I believe

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 15:07pm


The Small Faces had lots of UK-Euro hits. A couple were a bit Brit quirky, but nothing like that ridiculous Freddie and the Dreamers totally Shadows imitated song and dance routine. The Small Faces were mostly a hard core R&B based and pre-metal band with some later psychedelic overtones. So why skip singles like Tin Soldier, All or Nothing, Whatcha Gonna Do About It, Afterglow of Your Love, I Can't Make It, Rollin' Over, Autumn Stone, Red Balloon, etc. in your song list? Why ignore the acknowledged direct influence Marriott and the SF's had on Robert Plant and Zep with songs like You Need Loving and Come On Children? Why ignore what Elvis Costello has to say about what the Small Faces taught him or how Mick Jones ranks them? Or the influence they had on so many other artists that followed?

Although you like to talk a lot, it sounds like you don't really know much about the Small Faces music. You also seem confused about who the Faces were vs. Rod Stewart the solo artist. If you really want to hear the Small Faces music and story, there is a wonderful dvd that came out a year or two ago. Worth a netflix rental. Because as it stands now you aren't bringing much to the discussion.

Steve Marriott, by the way, was a true cockney lad and anyone who thinks the few times he sang with his real accent he sounded like Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins - with that awful half-American accent - clearly doesn't know his British accents very well.

Posted by Susie Q on Saturday, 10.15.11 @ 03:24am


"The Small Faces had lots of UK-Euro hits. A couple were a bit Brit quirky, but nothing like that ridiculous Freddie and the Dreamers totally Shadows imitated song and dance routine. The Small Faces were mostly a hard core R&B based and pre-metal band with some later psychedelic overtones. So why skip singles like Tin Soldier, All or Nothing, Whatcha Gonna Do About It, Afterglow of Your Love, I Can't Make It, Rollin' Over, Autumn Stone, Red Balloon, etc. in your song list?"

I'm not skipping anything. I said I liked Afterglow, and Autumn Stone too, but they're the exception not the rule. And the more pressing question was: how many of those songs are still popular play on oldies and classic rock stations?

"Why ignore the acknowledged direct influence Marriott and the SF's had on Robert Plant and Zep with songs like You Need Loving and Come On Children?"

He's only imitating singing style to a degree. You don't hear actual mod type themes in Zep's music.

"Why ignore what Elvis Costello has to say about what the Small Faces taught him"

I didn't. But as I said, Costello helped lead the charge or Wanda Jackson and NOT the Small Faces. It seems Jackson influenced Costello more than SF. Saying who influenced you in an interview is one thing. Who you actually push to have inducted is another.

"or how Mick Jones ranks them?"
Because the Clash sound nothing like SF.

"Or the influence they had on so many other artists that followed?"
Because they don't hear influences of SF in their music either.

"Although you like to talk a lot, it sounds like you don't really know much about the Small Faces music. You also seem confused about who the Faces were vs. Rod Stewart the solo artist. If you really want to hear the Small Faces music and story, there is a wonderful dvd that came out a year or two ago. Worth a netflix rental. Because as it stands now you aren't bringing much to the discussion. "

Yes I am, but you're ignoring it because you don't agree with it. I'm familiar with solo Stewart versus Faces. I even said Faces are pretty much the only reason we ever remember that Rod was a rocker at one point.

"Steve Marriott, by the way, was a true cockney lad and anyone who thinks the few times he sang with his real accent he sounded like Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins - with that awful half-American accent - clearly doesn't know his British accents very well."

Oh goodness no, that isn't what I said. I didn't say Marriott sounds like Van Dyke or that Marriott's is the voice of the barker... only that their general sound calls to mind that kind of mental picture.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 10.15.11 @ 18:55pm


The Small Faces / The Faces

The Inductees

Steve Marriott
Ronnie Lane
Ian McLagan
Kenney Jones
Rod Stewart
Ron Wood

I still think The Rock Hall is up to something. They nominated them as one entity, but they will induct them separately. You will see! They will bend the rules a little. Fearing one would get voted in but not the other in the same year, and they want them both inducted in the same year. Lane, McLagan and Jones will join Stephen Stills in being inducted twice in the same year. Joy Division and New Order are next and that is where it will stop. They will be nominated as Joy Division/New Order, but they will be inducted separately. You will see.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 11.3.11 @ 10:33am


I have a feeling The Spencer Davis Group is next because of this Small Faces/Faces nomination!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 11.17.11 @ 07:53am


Why can't you make this show as The Small Faces/The Faces on the main page? Is it impossible?

The_Small_Faces_Faces

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 12.7.11 @ 07:33am


"I have a feeling The Spencer Davis Group is next because of this Small Faces/Faces nomination!"

I certainly hope so.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Wednesday, 12.7.11 @ 08:32am


First off from this side of Pond, Rolling Stone Mag is a joke always has been,they pushed iggy pop and NY dolls as being ground breaking so they have No respect, Steve Marriott could blow any band off of stage at any given time, Unfortunatly Steve told it like it was and Never kissed anyones ass and Made enemys in Business side of Music. steve belongs in HOF, truly an original greatest soul singer ever

Posted by big rick on Wednesday, 12.7.11 @ 10:55am


And they demonstrated their disrespect for Steve Marriott once again by inducting Rod Stewart's backing band jointly with the Small Faces. If they think that much of (Rod Stewart and) the Faces, they should have been nominated on their own.

I'm glad Marriott's getting the much deserved nod, but I won't watch any ceremony where Rod Stewart is taking front and center whilst the Small Faces are being inducted.

Posted by Pat on Wednesday, 12.7.11 @ 12:26pm


Well, I proffer the olive branch to the Small Faces faithful. We'll never know how the joint nomination came to be, which side was considered stronger by the NomCom, or even whether Rod's promise to try and reunite Faces was a factor in getting them votes. But they're in together, so let's bury the hatchet here and now.

As a gesture of respect, I will ask the Small Faces fans: if you could pick ONE song from the Small Faces that best exemplifies their contributions--their innovation, influence, their general style, their helping to perpetuate the evolution--to rock and roll music, what would that one song be? Going back over the tracks I know and have in my personal collection, I'm tempted to go with "Lazy Sunday," but I'll let your voices be heard on this one.

Posted by Philip on Wednesday, 12.7.11 @ 21:11pm


One song? It's the collective body of work and it's influence they're being honoured for, but if it's an all or nothing question, well then, it's got to be All Or Nothing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzMJhq9fgwc

Would make a great wrap up jam for everyone, assuming Rod plans on doing Stay With Me as expected. I would if I were him. Wouldn't want the ghost of Steve Marriott looming over anything I sang.

Although Afterglow Of Your Love is my current Small Faces song of the week.

I like Lazy Sunday, but I'm not sure why anyone could consider it representative of their general style or influence. If anything, it was probably Steve feeling nostalgic for his childhood Oliver! stage days as 1968 was year the film version was released. He said many times they were just having a laugh with it and never intended it to be released as a single. So, don't get your point at all. Are you sure you're quite familiar with the band?

Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan aren't household names in North America. Neither are the Small Faces for that matter. But Rod Stewart = television ratings = money. And money, as we know, makes the world go round.

Posted by Timbo Canterbury on Thursday, 12.8.11 @ 01:13am


Lazy Sunday kind of struck me as the kind of carefree, fun-loving lyrical style you saw in earlier songs, but with a touch of mod, as they're considered the quintessential mod band apparently.

However, right now, I'm leaning more towards "Tin Soldier", with its more psychedelic tones... gives a sense of their evolution.

And yes, it does have to be just one song. I do a homemade CD set on the Rock Hall where every inductee (including the categories beyond Performer) have a song that exemplifies why they were inducted. While some artists do appear more than once because songs of theirs are used to represent some of the Non-Performers and Sidemen, each Performer gets exactly one song to stand for their induction as Performers in the Hall. In fact, I'm making a special exception for The Small Faces/The Faces, because there's just no clear consensus across the board, even in the bio which starts by calling them two bands, but then ends by saying they were ultimately one band, and having a picture of the Small group, but only mentioned Stewart-era songs in the bio-blurb... it's a major disconnect, so I'm gonna bend the rules this time and do a Small Faces song and a Faces song in the Class of 2012. I've go the Faces song figured out, but I'm willing this once to accept some input on the matter.

You would have to go and pick "All Or Nothing", though wouldn't you? One of the few major songs that ISN'T on my anthology of them.

Then again, at least I didn't suggest "Collibosher."

So, one suggestion so far. Any others?

Posted by Philip on Thursday, 12.8.11 @ 02:19am


'Tin Soldier' gets my vote.

Posted by Claire on Thursday, 12.8.11 @ 05:27am


The Faces versus Small Faces debate going back 2 years on this blog has been facinating to read. There really is a Euro preference for the Small Faces and an American preference for the later band. But the Rock Hall's official bio calls them "two bands in one," which pretty strongly suggests they are being treated as a single inductee and that neither would probably have made it without the other. I regarded the Faces as the best band not in the Hall up to this point on the basis of their incredible live show and that 3 members - Jones, Stewart and Wood - all went on to further stardom. In my mind, Faces also fairly gets credit for all the great Rod Stewart solo hits up through 1975 (Maggie Mae; Every Picture; You Wear it Well, etc) because they were the band playing them on the road. In America, for a few brief years, they rivaled the Stones, the Who and the Kinks as the greatest Brit rock band.

Posted by Charles McGarry on Sunday, 12.11.11 @ 08:01am


What will the trophies say for those who were only members of The Small Faces and for those who were only members of The Faces? Someone will have to ask Rod Stewart and Ron Wood to show their trophies to the camera so we can read them.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 12.15.11 @ 06:36am


They'll all say "Small Faces/Faces". That's how their inducting them, that's what the inscriptions will say.

Posted by Philip on Thursday, 12.15.11 @ 13:25pm


The Faces page has finally been taken down. Joy Division/New Order is next for induction and that's where joint inductions will stop. Trust me!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.26.12 @ 07:28am


JOINT INDUCTIONS: What Was/What Should Have Been/And What Will Be

01. 1996 - Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship
02. 1997 - The (Young) Rascals
03. 1997 - Parliament/Funkadelic
04. 2012 - The Small Faces/The Faces
05. 20?? - Joy Division/New Order
06. 20?? - Wham!/George Michael

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 01.28.12 @ 06:42am


The 2012 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductees

The Small Faces/The Faces

01. Steve Marriott (The Small Faces)
02. Kenney Jones (The Small Faces/The Faces)
03. Ronnie Lane (The Small Faces/The Faces)
04. Ian McLaglan (The Small Faces/The Faces)
05. Rod Stewart (The Faces)
06. Ronnie Wood (The Faces)

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 02.16.12 @ 23:57pm


No Jimmy Winston? He was a founding member of the Small Faces.

It's just strange to force these two different bands together. I'm having trouble thinking of a crossover artist to induct them as one band. Most Small Faces fans aren't Faces fans and the other way around. And I don't think it's just a UK vs. US thing. The music was entirely different.

Posted by Kathy on Monday, 02.20.12 @ 22:46pm


Kathy, not really. Were there differences? Yes. Were the differences more likely the result of the natural evolution of the sound than the dissolution of a group and the formation of a new? Yes.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 02.21.12 @ 16:54pm


"Were the differences more likely the result of the natural evolution of the sound than the dissolution of a group and the formation of a new? Yes."

No. And in fact nothing could be further from the truth.

Not to sound condescending, but you can't just read about the Small Faces and listen to a few songs to grasp the true nature of the band. In a short period they covered a great deal of different musical territory, and as they were sometimes covering different ground simultaneously, it's not easy to put them in any box.

With that said, however, it's very clear that the Small Faces, under the direction of that hard rocking control freak Steve Marriott, were heading in a much heavier direction.

Marriott-Lane was not an equal partnership. With the ironic exception of “Itchycoo Park“, Steve wrote all of their hits. Ronnie was responsible for taming Steve to the extent possible and adding an essential touch of whimsy and melodic sensibility. The Small Faces would not have been the Small Faces without Ronnie Lane, but there is no question that Steve Marriott was driving the bus, and he was driving that bus straight into much heavier territory. (in fact, the first known use of the term "heavy metal" to describe a band’s sound was Rolling Stone in 1970 in an article about Steve's next band, Humble Pie.)

It seems Ronnie tried to compromise with Steve in an effort not to lose him (listen to his uncharacteristically heavy tune "Song of a Baker" from 1968) but Steve ended the band because, for several reasons, he didn't believe he could successfully bring the SFs in the direction he wanted to go.

Ronnie Lane is the only creative link between the Small Faces and the Faces. But he was not the dominant partner in the creative partnership with Marriott, and there is no way the Small Faces were ever going to naturally evolve into a band that sounded anything like the rambling, loose, laid back, boozy Faces. Had the Small Faces survived into the 1970‘s, all indications are they likely would have instead evolved into a slightly gentler version of Humble Pie.

And this is why actual fans of the band - along with the band members themselves - consider them to be entirely separate bands.

Posted by GrahamR on Friday, 03.9.12 @ 19:32pm


Thanks for your input Graham, but again, when you listen to the First Step album, you hear that natural evolution. Steve Marriott was not the lynchpin of the group. Steve Marriott is not the "All Or Nothing" member of the Small Faces. No one member was.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 03.10.12 @ 13:43pm


PS... "heavier direction"... heavier like "Pool Hall Richard" and "Stay With Me" heavier? Because those were heavier than what the Steve Marriott era band did.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 03.10.12 @ 13:48pm


Why don't you just go sick to the induction!!

Posted by Roy on Friday, 04.13.12 @ 23:06pm


Might as well throw in Humble Pie too since they already put The Small Faces and The Faces together. Then they wouldn't have to worry about inducting Frampton solo.

Posted by Arrow Man on Saturday, 04.14.12 @ 17:45pm


Faces want NRBQ and The Monkees inducted!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 04.15.12 @ 08:03am


"PS... "heavier direction"... heavier like "Pool Hall Richard" and "Stay With Me" heavier? Because those were heavier than what the Steve Marriott era band did."

Nah. "Song of a Baker", "Wham Bam Thank You Ma'am", "Rollin' Over", "Don't Burst My Bubble", "Tin Soldier" etc, all proto metal Small Faces from their late period.
Marriott ditched Lane and formed Humble Pie because Lane strongly objected to Steve's heavy metal leanings. They were no longer musically compatible with each other, so Marriott took the baby, the bath water and the rubber duck and threw them all out the window. A bloody shame it was, but that's what happened. No way were the Faces a natural musical continuation of the Small Faces. The Hall just lumped them together for expediency.

So Stewart didn’t show up? Did he object to having to sing a Small Faces tune or two? Kenney Jones said he was supposed to sing Tin Soldier and/or All or Nothing. Not that I blame Rod if that’s the case. It would have been very weird, and I'm not sure Old Rod would want to invite any comparisons to the ghost of the young Steve Marriott.

Posted by Jake on Friday, 05.4.12 @ 12:31pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48zBE4-wGMM

Steven Van Zandt inducts The Small Faces/The Faces

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 05.22.12 @ 20:43pm


Roy
thanks for the link!

Posted by Happy on Tuesday, 05.22.12 @ 22:16pm


Humble Pie mentioned by Steven Van Zandt in his induction speech for The Small Faces/The Faces.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 06.7.12 @ 22:52pm


I'd read Stevie Van Zandt's almost gushing induction speech about the Small Faces, but was just able to watch the HBO televised version and I see that it was severely truncated in favor of the Faces. And when the surviving Small Faces/Faces were walking out to accept their awards "Whatcha Gonna Do About It" was playing to the crowd, but the broadcast version changed it to a Rod Stewart sung Faces song instead.

So I guess the moral of HBO's/Rolling Stone's story is that Americans are clueless about music and if they haven't heard songs played over and over again on AM radio it’s too overwhelming for them to hear the first hit of an incredibly influential band.

Not surprised. Actually it's probably more shocking that Rolling Stone et al were finally forced to break down and acknowledge the brilliance and long lasting influence of a group of organically formed teens who had no chance to market themselves in North America.

I agree with those who say the internet and especially youtube has made the difference.

And no, Rod Stewart didn't come. I'd like to think it was out of respect for Steve Marriott - a SF song or two was sung by Mick Hucknall but not broadcast - but my guess is that he thinks he's far more important than Ronnie Wood and the Small Faces. My grandmother likes him. She can have him.

Posted by faaker22 on Wednesday, 09.5.12 @ 01:08am


Ian McLagan RIP

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 12.3.14 @ 20:08pm


RIP Ian, your keyboards were the identifying factor for both eras/bands.

Posted by Philip on Thursday, 12.4.14 @ 12:45pm


I just heard the news today.

RIP, Ian McLagan. He may not have been a founding member, but his skill on the Hammond added a true warmth and depth to the sound of the amazing Small Faces.

Stay well, Kenney.

Posted by Joe on Thursday, 12.25.14 @ 02:31am


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