James Brown

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer

Category: Performer

Inducted in: 1986

Inducted by: Steve Winwood

Nominated in: 1986

First Eligible: 1986 Ceremony


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 1986 (ranked #7) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Live At The Apollo (1963)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Please, Please, Please (1956)
I Got You (I Feel Good) (1965)
Papa's Got A Brand New Bag (Pt. 1&2) (1965)
It's a Man's Man's Man's World (1966)
Say It Loud- I'm Black And I'm Proud (1968)
Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine (1970)
The Funky Drummer (1970)
Get Up Offa That Thing (1976)

James Brown @ Wikipedia

James Brown Videos

Comments

16 comments so far (post your own)

The "Godfather of Soul"

'nuff said

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 07.12.10 @ 12:58pm


"Mister Dynamite" and "The Hardest Working Man In Show Business".

But where the Famous Flames ?

Posted by Bill G. on Saturday, 07.16.11 @ 22:20pm


http://www.futurerocklegends.com/artist.php?artist_id=The_Famous_Flames

James Brown's backup singers, The Famous Flames, were inducted into the Rock Hall in 2012.

Posted by Future Rock Legends on Tuesday, 05.8.12 @ 11:28am


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDTJaDUaoVM

'Bout time, too. especially since they all started out together, and JAMES BROWN was a member of the Flames too... Bobby Bennett, the last surviving member of the Flames, verified this when he recently talked to the Rock Hall,which can be seen at the above link.

Posted by Bill G. on Tuesday, 05.8.12 @ 13:15pm


""Mister Dynamite" and "The Hardest Working Man In Show Business".

But where the Famous Flames ?

Posted by Bill G. on Saturday, 07.16.11

At the time I wrote that, July of 2011, The Famous Flames hadn't been inducted yet. Little did I know....

Posted by Bill G. on Tuesday, 05.8.12 @ 13:19pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GzMQxxFICc

From Wikipedia:

"The Famous Flames were an R&B vocal group founded by Bobby Byrd in 1953. Internationally renowned singer James Brown began his career as a member of The Famous Flames before becoming a solo artist. On hit recordings such as "Please, Please, Please", "Try Me", "Think"," I Don't Mind ","Shout and Shimmy", "Bewildered", "Oh Baby, Don't You Weep", and "I'll Go Crazy" the group's smooth backing harmonies contrasted strikingly with Brown's own rough, impassioned delivery, and their synchronized dance steps were a prominent visual feature of his live shows. The Famous Flames performed with Brown on many of his live and studio albums, including his breakthrough Live at the Apollo, and appeared with him in the films The T.A.M.I. Show and Ski Party."

According to The Famous Flames' Rock and Roll Hall of Fame bio:
"The Famous Flames served as James Brown’s backup singers from their formation in 1953 until they disbanded in 1968. One of the Famous Flames, Bobby Byrd, remained with Brown through 1973, essentially serving as Brown’s right-hand man for 20 years. Brown’s years with the Famous Flames represent his greatest period of impact as a driving force in soul music and as a live performer. The Famous Flames not only sang but also were part of the stage choreography that made Brown’s shows so spectacular. Although James Brown was the undisputed leader, the Famous Flames ... played a significant role in his success. In fact, Brown himself was initially just one of the Flames before he busted out to become the Godfather of Soul."

The Digital Dream Door website had this to say about James Brown & The Famous Flames:
"James Brown - 1986 Though for years people believed the Famous Flames were James Brown's backing band, those instrumental giants had no official credit on record and in fact had no recognized name until they were dubbed the J.B.'s in the 70's for lack of anything else to refer to them as. The Flames in fact were the (name of the) vocal group Brown joined in the mid-50's and with his presence making them Famous, they continued to use that moniker for a dozen years. They were led by Bobby Byrd, one of the most important side figures in a major star's career, and while they featured fluctuating membership over the years, the most prominent members included Johnny Terry, Bobby Bennett and Eugene "Baby Lloyd" Stallworth. The combination of the gospel-derived harmonies of the Flames and the intense leads of Brown made the group the undisputed leaders of the soul movement and the most explosive act in all of rock."

Posted by Bill G. on Tuesday, 05.8.12 @ 13:24pm


http://www.futurerocklegends.com/artist.php?artist_id=The_Famous_Flames

****THE FAMOUS FLAMES****

For more comments,go to the Famous Flames' site by clicking on the above link.

Posted by Bill G. on Friday, 08.17.12 @ 20:02pm


My frist time I ever saw or heard James Brown was when I watched the 1980 film,The Blues Brothers. The scene was where Brown was playing a pastor and he started singing "The Old Landmark" and I was just hooked from the moment the song started. I loved his high hitting voice! James Brown is truly a legend in the world of soul music and certainly a master perfomer when it comes to dance moves. Through his gospel powered vocals, Brown could get an audience up and dancing then any other singer could before.

It's also interesting how big of an impact James Brown made on soul and funk and all the artists he influenced from Sly And The Family Stone and Percy Sledge to Michael Jackson are just as amazing.

Lastly, My two favorite songs by James are "Living In America" and "Papa's Got A Brand New Bag".

Posted by Andrew on Wednesday, 10.10.12 @ 23:34pm


"Soul Brother Number One," "The Godfather of Soul," "The Hardest Working Man in Show Business," "Mr. Dynamite," and "The Original Disco Man." James Brown has more nicknames then any other perfromer in music history, yet no one can question why he earned them more then any one else.

This however is certain: James was a crucial link in two revolutions of black music. He was one of the top three people responsible for turning R&B into soul and the person responsible for turning soul into funk. Even rap has James Brown to thank. His transformation of gospel into the explosiveness of R&B, together with precise choreography and charismatic showmanship helped define the directions black music would take in the next few decades.

While other singers were more popular and others were equally skilled, few African-American singers were as influential over the course of popluar music and no other musician could put on a more energetic show: Brown's perfomances were wonders of stamina and timing. With songs like "Hot Pants," "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag," and "Living In America," He could get a roomful of pople up and dancing like no other singer could before.

Despite his problems, Brown's music is more influential today then ever before as his voice and dance moves have been sampled on rap records and many have hailed his innovations in rock and soul. Of course, his influence on soul, funk and rap artists from Percy Sledge and Sly & The Family Stone to Michael Jackson and Prince still radiates through the music world to this day.

Posted by Andrew on Sunday, 06.2.13 @ 19:59pm


"Soul Brother Number One," "The Godfather of Soul," "The Hardest Working Man in Show Business," "Mr. Dynamite," and "The Original Disco Man." James Brown has more nicknames then any other perfromer in music history, yet no one can question why he earned them more then any one else.

This however is certain: James was a crucial link in two revolutions of black music. He was one of the top three people responsible for turning R&B into soul and the person responsible for turning soul into funk. Even rap has James Brown to thank. His transformation of gospel into the explosiveness of R&B, together with precise choreography and charismatic showmanship helped define the directions black music would take in the next few decades.

While other singers were more popular and others were equally skilled, few African-American singers were as influential over the course of popluar music and no other musician could put on a more energetic show: Brown's perfomances were wonders of stamina and timing. With songs like "Hot Pants," "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag," and "Living In America," He could get a roomful of people up and dancing like no other singer could before.

Despite his problems, Brown's music is more influential today then ever before as his voice and dance moves have been sampled on rap records and many have hailed his innovations in rock and soul. Of course, his influence on soul, funk and rap artists from Percy Sledge and Sly & The Family Stone to Michael Jackson and Prince still radiates through the music world to this day.

Posted by Andrew on Sunday, 06.2.13 @ 20:02pm


"Soul Brother Number One," "The Godfather of Soul," "The Hardest Working Man in Show Business," "Mr. Dynamite," and "The Original Disco Man." James Brown had more nicknames attached to his name then any other performer in music history, yet none question that he earned these names more than any other artist.

Other singers were more popular and others were equally skilled, but few African-American musicians were so influential over the course of rock n' roll and no other musician could put on a more energetic show: Brown's performances were wonders of stamina and timing.

This however is certain: through the gospel impassioned fury of his vocals and the complex rhythms of his beats, Brown was a crucial link in two revolutions in African-American music. Along with Ray Charles and Sam Cooke, James Brown was one of the three artists responsible for turning R&B into soul and the figure responsible for turning soul into funk in the late 60s and early 70s. Even rap in the 80s has James Brown to thank.

His transformation of gospel into the explosive intensity of R&B, together with precise choreography and charismatic showmanship, helped to define the direction black music would take from the release of Brown's first hit, "Please, Please, Please." in 1956 to the present day.

His life history tells of triumph over multiple adversities. Starting with The Famous Flames, James established himself as a fine R&B singer and the group became a close knit ensemble that showcased their talents as singers and multi-instrumentalists.

James was also a captivating performer won would incorporate a furious cycle of spins, drops and rapid speech into his skintight R&B. What Elvis Presley was to rock and roll, James Brown was to R&B: a highly productive and dominant phenom.

Like Elvis, he was also a three figure hitmaker, with 114 total songs on Billboard's R&B singles chart and 94 of those songs have made the Hot 100 singles chart. Over the years, he amassed 800 songs in his body of artistic work while maintaining a tiring touring schedule.

Recording for King and Federal record labels in the 50s and 60s, he distilled R&B down to it's essence on classic albums like "Live at the Apollo," and songs like "Cold Sweat," "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag," and "I Got You." By the late 60s, Brown attained the status of a musical and cultural revolution, owning to his message of black pride with songs like "Say It Loud, I'm Black and I'm Proud" had a continuing effect in the black community, in which he was regarded as a leader and a role model.

After the mid-70s, Brown did little but trend water artistically and his financial and substance abuse eventually him got a controversial jail sentence. However, a cameo role in "The Blues Brothers" and his acknowledgment as a pioneer of rap helped trigger a resurgence in his career.

Yet, despite his problems, his music is still more influential than ever, as his voice and rhythms have been sampled on countless rap songs. James even recorded a song called "Unity" with rapper Afrika Bambaataa. Music critics have lately hailed his innovations as among the most important in rock and soul.

Ever since I first saw James Brown in “The Blues Brothers,” I’ve been hooked on his music. His stage presence is phenomenal and he could get a roomful of people up and dancing like few artists could or have.

Of course, Brown's influence on soul, funk and rap artists from Sly & The Family Stone and Stevie Wonder to Run D.M.C. and Michael Jackson can not be understated and his music still lives on to this day.

Posted by Andrew on Thursday, 03.6.14 @ 00:25am




http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/get_on_up/

******GET ON UP-8/1/14*****

ROTTEN TOMATOES gives an 86% POSITIVE RATING

Posted by Bill G. on Wednesday, 07.30.14 @ 19:33pm


Can't wait to see it!

Posted by Andrew on Wednesday, 07.30.14 @ 21:24pm


I recently saw Get On Up with my stepmother and I really loved it! Chadwick Boseman's performance as The Godfather of Soul was dynamite. The whole story was well put together, especially Brown's backstory and his childhood. The music was rockin' and when the end credits rolled, I was bopping my head and tapping my feet. Upon seeing this film, I'm encouraged to see more feature films about musicians like The Doors, The Buddy Holly Story, Nowhere Boy, and Ray.

For people who enjoy James Brown's music or just want to see a great film about a musical legend, go see this movie.

Posted by Andrew on Monday, 09.1.14 @ 20:20pm


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