Frank Sinatra

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1964 (The 1965 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? No  what's this?


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 1994 (ranked #13 in the Influences - Pre-Rock Era category) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
In The Wee Small Hours (1955)
Songs For Swingin' Lovers (1956)
Come Fly With Me (1958)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
The House I Live In (1946)
I Get a Kick Out of You (1953)
I've Got The World On A String (1953)
In The Wee Small Hours of the Morning (1955)
Love And Marriage (1955)
I've Got You Under My Skin (1955)
You Make Me Feel So Young (1955)
The Lady Is a Tramp (1958)
Come Fly With Me (1958)
Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas (1963)
Fly Me To The Moon (In Other Words) (1964)
It Was a Very Good Year (1965)
Somethin' Stupid (1967)
My Way (1969)
Theme From New York, New York (1980)

Frank Sinatra @ Wikipedia

Frank Sinatra Videos

Will Frank Sinatra be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

46 comments so far (post your own)

Yesterday I saw Frank's name voted on, and I was stunned to realize he was even on here. Someone's got to start the post when it comes to Frank, so I'll do it. Had the Hall not messed up by sticking everyone & their aunt Fannie in this place, there'd be no need for consideration. So. Innovation & influence? If you have to ask this.... The #'s? Once again, if you have to ask this....

Can you make an actual rock case for Frank? Try this - One, the man did attempt, in the mid-50's, to record a rock album. While I've never heard this, it is a fact, as many people have stated. He didn't care for it and never released it.

Two, his covers of rock songs & willingness to work w/ some famous rock artists at the end of his career.

Three - this is often overlooked. When the Doors first broke, a few reviewers noted how Jim Morrison's vocals compared more to a crooner than to the drugged out psychedelic style of the moment. In fact there were reviewers who described him as a "psychedelic Sinatra". Since Morrison's style was an early precursor to arena vocalists like the much talked about Steve Perry, can we not take it a step further back and say that Sinatra's vocals (a mix of both the crooner and swinger era's here) were an unwitting precursor to the Journey's/Foreigners/etc.? Hell, even Van Halen w/DLR would go into a patter w/ the audience that resembled a more hipped-up version of old Sinatra.

Of course they won't dare put Frank in, despite the leeway they've given themselves to do so. The Rock Hall has it's natural pecking order in place, & they dare not acknowledge that their best, to this date, has actually been second best.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Wednesday, 08.20.08 @ 06:16am


Frank is the one artist I heard more of in the 60's than any other. Of course that had to do with growing up in an Italian family and living in the heart of Little Italy in NYC. If your father or mother wasn't playing him, everyone of your neighbors were.

Sinatra was everything I hated as I grew up. It wasn't until I saw him perform at the Garden on my Godfather's b-day did I realize what an amazing performer he was. My eyes were opened, that's for sure. I started really listening to him after that and came to appreciate the artist that he was.

If you all want to know where RnR swagger came from, then look no further than Frank. If you look up the term "stage presence", you will see Sinatra's picture. He didn't just sing the lyrics; he told a story with his vocals. Just listen to "It Was A Very Good Year". I have heard this song a thousand times and it can still bring a tear to my eye. This song matches up to any Rock ballad every recorded including Nights in White Satin, Stairway, Dream On, In My Life - any of them.

If the Ink Spots and Louis Armstrong were inducted, I think a case can be made for Frank. I am not saying it should; but I guess you can make a reasonable arguement if you wanted to.

I know one thing, if he ever was, I would be afraid of the day that I met up with my fathers and uncles in heaven. Man, they will give me some serious sh*t.

This was a good post C.C.

Posted by Dameon on Wednesday, 08.20.08 @ 07:10am


Frank Sinatra has been eligible since 1964. (1939-1964); that's 25 years! This pre-dates Rock and Roll. The Rock Hall's first induction ceremony was in 1986. This means that Sinatra will most likely be inducted in the Early Influence Category, or the Lifetime Achievement category.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.10.08 @ 07:39am


Frank Sinatra has been eligible since 1964. (1939-1964); that's 25 years! This pre-dates Rock and Roll. The Rock Hall's first induction ceremony was in 1986. This means that Sinatra will most likely be inducted in the Early Influence Category, or the Lifetime Achievement category. That's what they did for Louis Armstrong!

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.10.08 @ 07:40am


Frank Sinatra has been eligible since 1964. (1939-1964); that's 25 years! This pre-dates Rock and Roll. The Rock Hall's first induction ceremony was in 1986. This means that Sinatra will most likely be inducted in the Early Influence Category, or the Lifetime Achievement category. That's what they did for Louis Armstrong!

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.24.08 @ 10:17am


Hank Williams' career started 8 years after Frank and Hank is in the early influence category. So the early influence category is where I'd put Frank.

Posted by Keebord on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 16:03pm


Sinatra should be inducted if only because he totally set the stage for the singer as "front man" that would epitomize the rock era. They should do it in 2015 for the 100th anniversary of his birth.

Posted by Will on Friday, 02.27.09 @ 22:11pm


This is the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, not the Music Hall of Fame.

Posted by SSR on Tuesday, 03.24.09 @ 11:37am


Well I'm back.

There is no way we can induct Frank Sinatra as a Performer because he really was more of a pop musician than a rock musician. And he predates rock itself.

I'm not sure if Frank Sinatra should be inducted as an I.E either. Does he have any influence on rock music?(serious question, I'm not sure.)

Posted by Dude Man on Wednesday, 08.12.09 @ 10:51am


Frank Sinatra? I'm not voting No, simply out of respect for his talent. But am not voting Yes either, because then you would also want to have Tony Bennet and Pavarotti and any/every other good singer. The definition of "rock" is getting pretty fuzzy, but there has to be boundaries.

Posted by Worm on Wednesday, 08.12.09 @ 17:55pm


I'm going to say No, but only because I know that Frank never liked rock n' roll, and never actually released any music of this genre. There is no doubt that he was one of the most talented musicians around. He's definitely my favorite. But, out of respect, I would say no, this wouldn't be the right place for him.

Posted by Meghan on Saturday, 08.15.09 @ 19:52pm


"Strangers in the Night" alone probably inspired generations of "macho men" to have one night stands after "alternative" dating practice discos. Think about it, who falls in love from "just a glance" and why are they sneaking around at night? Who are they hiding from? Maybe they're a discriminated minority? P.S. Nowhere in the song does he mention anything about a woman or anything feminine.

Posted by Orange on Tuesday, 09.1.09 @ 05:14am


I actually would vote yes for Frank Sinatra. Not as a "Performer," but I think he should definitely be considered as an "Early Influence."

Yes, he was more of a traditional pop vocalist, and was part of the era of popular music that pre-dated rock and roll. Yes, he also detested rock and roll music, at least early on.

But whether he anticipated it or not, Frank had more influence on rock and roll music as a whole than most people realize or will give him credit for.

Many people forget, but very early in Frank's career in the early 1940's, when he was first becoming popular, just like Elvis, the Beatles, the Doors, KISS, the Sex Pistols, and gangster rap artists after him, Frank wasn't looked highly upon by older music listeners. It could be argued that Frank was the first artist geared towards the youth, even before Elvis. Frank was more popular with younger kids, and kind of looked upon in bad taste by adults, early in his career anyway. So it could be argued that Frank sort of paved the way for the general role of rock and roll music, that being music that was seen as rebellious and threatening to adults and geared towards teenagers. Frank may have been the first "teen idol." In music anyway.

But more importantly than that, from a musical standpoint, Frank's biggest influence on rock music was his pioneering albums he made in the mid-to late 1950's on Capitol Records. Before the Beatles, Bob Dylan, the Beach Boys, and Jimi Hendrix ushered in the album age for rock music in the mid '60s, Frank was the one that pioneered and revolutionzed the artistic purpose of the LP. Frank was the first artist in popular music to take album making seriously. His albums such as "In the Wee Small Hours," "Come Fly With Me," and "Frank Sinatra Sings for the Lonely" were some of the first "concept albums" in that they were some of the earliest albums to have a set of songs that were connected with a general theme or concept. And not just 2 or 3 hit songs with some filler like most pop artists did in that time. Many of his albums during this period were true works of art that would pre-date many of the earliest rock concept albums. He also was the first artist to use the covers of the LPs to convey a particular theme and message, which was also an important ingredient in selling the album as true artisic work.

Frank was the first artist in popular music to see the artistic potential that LPs could achieve, which was truly significant in elevating the artistic merit of popular music as a whole. Rock and Roll music I would say gained more artistic merit from serious musicians and artists when LPs became bigger works of arts in the mid '60s and '70s. When rock artists focused less on hit singles, and started focusing more on albums, I think more music critics and musicians outside of the rock music realam started paying closer attention to rock music and giving it more credit as a viable form of art (the attention and press that Sgt. Pepper's got upon it's release is a fine example of this). And had it not been for Frank's pioneering usage of LPs in the '50s, it may not have happened.

So Frank was highly important in the artistic progression of LP's which was a major part of rock history, in addition to perhaps setting the stage for the role that rock and roll music and popular music as a whole would play in our culture and in particular with the "generation line" (being looked down upon by adults and loved by teenagers and younger people).

So with those two things in mind, I think Frank Sinatra should be inducted as an "Early Influence" to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, for his pioneering works on LPs and for his important cultural role in the '40s which paved the way for the cultural role of rock and roll music. And not to mention along with Elvis, the Beatles, and Michael Jackson, he was one of the "giants" of 20th century popular music.

Posted by Donnie on Wednesday, 09.2.09 @ 04:59am


Great posting on Sinatra.

Don't forget the role Nelson Riddle played on Frank's work in the 50's. Frank was revolutionary in his approach to the classics, but Riddle's arrangements also re-wrote the book on how the "Great American Songbook" could sound.

They had a boatload of staggering material to work with, and their re-interpretations still hold up to this day...

Posted by Cheesecrop on Wednesday, 09.2.09 @ 05:18am


Question: Did Frank Sinatra directly influence anybody within the context of rock music?

If so, then I would be fine with his induction as an EI. If he didn't, then he doesn't deserve it.

Posted by Dude Man on Wednesday, 09.2.09 @ 09:46am


Question: Did Frank Sinatra directly influence anybody within the context of rock music?

If so, then I would be fine with his induction as an EI. If he didn't, then he doesn't deserve it.

Posted by Dude Man on Wednesday, 09.2.09 @ 09:46am
--------------------------------------------------
Jim Morrison admitted he liked Sinatra. I believe I read it in a book called "No One Here Get's Out Alive". Forget the author's of the book, but oddly enough I remember that it was in reference to a record company bio for reporters.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Wednesday, 09.2.09 @ 18:21pm


Sinatra was just ubiquitous... anyone who's from Jersey loves and most likely was influenced by Sinatra in some way. I think his original hatred of rock'n'roll will work to keep him out... but also... can we name a pre-rock era song of his that has been found to be influential towards the development of rock'n'roll? Or is it more his image, his swagger, his good looks and charm, and yeah, maybe even his ability to sing that makes the impact? I mean, I hate to make him sound like a pre-rock version of Madonna, but just from the way this is going, it sounds like that's what this is.

Posted by Philip on Wednesday, 09.2.09 @ 18:29pm


Why is this man not in the hall of fame yet? Im over here yapping away that Slayer and Ronnie Dio need to get in when "ol' blue eyes" has been overlooked for years when he should have been part of one of the first 10 classes. Shame on the Hall. This man impacted american culture in the 50's and 60's not only music.

Posted by Carlos on Monday, 09.7.09 @ 15:07pm


Sinatra belongs as an early influence. I'm suprised to learn that he hasn't been inducted yet.

Posted by Breaker on Wednesday, 09.9.09 @ 12:32pm


if madonna is in, he sure as hell should be in

Posted by Chris on Saturday, 10.17.09 @ 11:57am


I would put him in as an early influence.

Posted by Brian on Monday, 10.19.09 @ 07:37am


Frank Sinatra should be in the Early Infleunce Category. He was huge for his time and was a great frontman. He'll probably get inducted in a couple years.




Posted by Joe on Sunday, 10.25.09 @ 11:28am


Definitely should be in as an Easly Influence. Weird that he's not. I mean, he's similare to Barbra Streisand- she's a legend, but voters probably are "put off" by the glossy material at times. Sinatra is a decently acclaimed act, though, so, again, surprising.

Posted by JR on Monday, 11.30.09 @ 20:34pm


he has influenced many artists like elvis presley jim morris paul mccartney and a hel of a lot more if hes not inducted as a perormer at least he should be induced as a early influence

Posted by tron on Saturday, 02.6.10 @ 23:23pm


Just ask Bono if Frank should be inducted. He said this: "Rock and Roll people love Frank Sinatra because Frank has got what we want: swagger and attitude he's big on attitude Serious attitude, bad attitude Frank's the Chairman of the bad Rock and Roll plays at being tough but this guy, well, he's the boss The boss of bosses The man The big bang of pop I'm not gonna mess with him, are you?"

Enough said. Cut the crap and induct him already!

Posted by basieman on Monday, 03.1.10 @ 17:50pm


Sinatra should've been one of the early ones considered. I don't care much if they induct Streisand but Sinatra shoul'dve been a MUST.

He would be perfect in the Early Influences category, but he'd fit right as well in the performers' one.

Posted by Matt Love on Monday, 03.22.10 @ 19:00pm


No, Sinatra was certainly not Rock & Roll. Not as such. And yet on the other hand there is something about him that sets him apart from his peers from the pre-R&R traditional pop era. I mean, would anyone here really consider Dean Martin or Patti Page in this lot? There must be a reason that I rather listen to Frank than to Elvis. I guess you could call it credibility.

Posted by denyo on Saturday, 07.24.10 @ 18:07pm


For all acts who would have been eligible before 1986, if there was a HOF back then, should the eligibility not say 1986? That's when the HOF started inducting, after all.

Anyhow- "rock and roll" is an umbrella term to include music other than just rock, so I don't see why Sinatra couldn't be an "Early Influence."

Posted by JR1 on Monday, 08.2.10 @ 18:19pm


Why no sense of urgency here?

Posted by az on Thursday, 01.20.11 @ 08:54am


Early influence would be great for Sinatra, and he deserves it.

Posted by Bob on Sunday, 03.13.11 @ 12:46pm


If Frank Sinatra is being considered for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, than so should artists like the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, Lawrence Welk, and Kate Smith.

Posted by John Harrold on Monday, 06.13.11 @ 15:35pm


Yes, Sinatra is not rock but but but but he's the greastest singer of all time. He easily influenced them all, in one way or the other. So induct him as Early Influence. Not even considered yet? Shame, Shame, Shame.

Posted by Robert on Tuesday, 11.15.11 @ 11:31am


frank sinatra hasnt made it in? come on, man. sure he might not be rock and roll but he revolutionized it, with out him im sure rock wouldnt be what it has become.

Posted by Kyle on Thursday, 06.28.12 @ 17:46pm


His omission is frankly embarrassing.

Posted by GFW on Friday, 06.29.12 @ 12:24pm


"There must be a reason that I rather listen to Frank than to Elvis. I guess you could call it credibility."

Wow, that just might be the most inane comment ever submitted to FRL, and considering some of the verbal sewage that has seeped its way here (mainly by Liam/William, Chalkie, Evangelist, the endless ICP/Senses Fail/Coven/NKOTB\Steve Perry fanboys and fangirls and a few other unmentionables), that's covering an awful lot of ground.

I realize that denyo no longer posts here (Thank God), but I'd to pose this question: What exactly gives someone credibility for preferring Frank Sinatra to Elvis Presley? If anything, making such a statement comes off as a value judgement, and a highly erroneous one at that. Elvis Presley was a highly credible singer and overall great entertainer in my book. His rendition of My Way toasts the overplayed and overblown Sinatra version. Presley imbues it with a heartfelt passion lacking in the bland Sinatra take.

I have a strong distaste for most of the 1940s/1950s classic pop vocalists because their styles were largely interchangeable. The likes of Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, Johnnie Ray, Tony Bennett, and Doris Day just bore me to tears. When you listen to that saccharine nonsense, you can understand why rock 'n' roll came to be. There are exceptions, like Nat King Cole and Dean Martin, but they're diamonds in the rough. Is it any wonder that the somnambulistic albums of Kitty Kallen and Johnny Mathis are collecting dust in Salvation Army and Goodwill stores, while the works of Buddy Holly and Queen are still being enjoyed and discussed?

Posted by Zach on Saturday, 06.30.12 @ 00:24am


I'd consider Frank a notch above all those others, In The Wee Small Hours is one of the few 50's albums I've heard that is actually good. He's a hell of a lot more significant than, say, Dean martin or Doris Day.

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 06.30.12 @ 06:35am


I have a strong distaste for most of the 1940s/1950s classic pop vocalists because their styles were largely interchangeable. The likes of Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, Johnnie Ray, Tony Bennett, and Doris Day just bore me to tears. When you listen to that saccharine nonsense, you can understand why rock 'n' roll came to be. There are exceptions, like Nat King Cole and Dean Martin, but they're diamonds in the rough. Is it any wonder that the somnambulistic albums of Kitty Kallen and Johnny Mathis are collecting dust in Salvation Army and Goodwill stores, while the works of Buddy Holly and Queen are still being enjoyed and discussed?

Posted by Zach on Saturday, 06.30.12 @ 00:24am
--------------------------------------------------
One is adult music of it's era, meant to be enjoyed by adults of the time. The other was meant to be dance music for kids (at least that was the original intent).

Back when those folks were younger (in the 30's and 40's) and could run w/the pack, they did danceable music, or at least their definition of it, for their times. A lot of the 50's stuff was for people who'd knocked their socks off at a ballroom 10 or 15 yrs. earlier.

The rock & roller's have that same problem, only lots of people don't notice it. Think of what the artists of the 50's sounded like when they recorded material in the 1980's. Think about 1960's artists, & their 1990's material, & so on & so forth. Nothing really changed.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 07.2.12 @ 07:00am


I don't necessarily agree that the rock 'n' roll of the 1950s was strictly dance music. That may have been the perception back then, but the so-called "adult" singers recorded lots of nonsense. If we use 'Ol Blue Eyes as our example, look no further than his duet with Dagmar of Mama Will Bark. Mitch Miller (one of the biggest SOBs to ever live) forced it upon Sinatra, but Frankie was just as much to blame for not having the dignity to turn down such a pile of garbage.

On the flip side, Fats Domino's Going to the River is one of the saddest, most depressing songs you'll ever hear. It's about a man who commits suicide because his girlfriend left him and isn't coming back. Nothing danceable about that song. Domino is known for his joyous, upbeat brand of New Orleans R%B, but Going to the River is a very downbeat blues number with an appropriately low-key piano arrangement. Mind you, I like Fats's upbeat music, but I can enjoy a song like Going to the River.

Posted by Zach on Friday, 07.6.12 @ 21:17pm


Hey zach, you have obviously never really listened or studied the bulk of music Sinatra recorded for Capitol in the 50s. Sinatra recorded absolutely brilliant and bleak "downer" concept albums like Only the Lonely (no, not the Roy Orbison song) and No One Cares. They are often referred to in music literature as "suicide" albums. No, they arent rock and roll but they have the same impact as later rock n roll albums. I am a total rock n roll freak - i love rock n roll and have close to 8,000 albums, and i rank Sinatra's Only the Lonely in my alltime top 5 albums! It is easy to put Sinatra down for recording a stupid song like Mama Dont Bark, but it takes more effort to educate yourself about ALL types of music. If you knew Frank Sinatra's music better, you would probably be in awe of much if it and you certainly wouldnt lump him in with Dean martin, Perry Como, and that crowd.

Posted by C Paiste on Saturday, 09.29.12 @ 04:30am


C Paiste, please improve your reading comprehension. I never put Dean Martin in the category of somnambulistic, traditional pop singers. What I did say was that Dean Martin is an exception, meaning that I like his music.

I never used Mama Will Bark as the definitive example of why I dislike Frank Sinatra. I used the song as an example of how traditional pop singers didn't always record "adult" songs.

Next time you attempt to pick apart someone's argument, try reading it all the way through first.

Posted by Zach on Friday, 10.5.12 @ 18:50pm


Frank Sinatra had an influence on Rock N' Roll.
Ironic, Michael Jackson is already in before Quincy Jones (2013 induction), the man who produced and arranged the music to revamp Michael's career. Know that before Michael Jackson, there was Frank Sinatra who paved the way for many artist styles...including Rock N' Roll. Even Quincy Jones produced and arranged Frank Sinatra's Music. Glad to see Quincy Jones get his recognition. This Rock N' Roll Hall of Fame is a Joke. There are artists who are way past 25 years since their first successful record who are bypassed in the voting process. Note that I am glad that "Heart" - Ann & Nancy Wilson got inducted for 2013. Whoever is on the selection committee for inductees, now we know why public education is dropping music programs. What really inspired Rock N' Roll? They say that Classical Music, Polkas, R & B, Folk, and Country inspired Rock N' Roll. Rap Music is now in the Rock N' Roll Hall of Fame...a form of Poetry with Rhyme. Face the facts...there are artists who are snubbed from induction. Honor them before they die. Some can argue that Disco has no influence on Rock N' Roll. Yet, Donna Summer is in ...not as a Disco artist...rather an inspiration of Rock N' Roll. Glad that Donna's Family was there to reap the reward of induction to the Rock N' Roll Hall of Fame. The issue is about qualification and recognition. If Public Enemy, Beastie Boys, and Donna Summer make it...why are early influences like Frank Sinatra, Louis Prima, and many others passed by on consideration? All Rock N' Rollers got their start in a church, in a bar or pub, or on a street corner. Being from Philadelphia...a diversity of culture, my music is diversified to incorporate all styles. Rock N' Roll will always be a part of me that keeps me young. The question remains if younger generations will keep it alive. The other will be if government keeps making massive cutbacks to schools (even in Philadelphia) to eliminate Music Programs for the next generation ? Will there be Rock N' Roll and a clear definition of it?

Posted by STDPhilly69 on Sunday, 05.19.13 @ 15:52pm


Rock N' Roll will always be a part of me that keeps me young. The question remains if younger generations will keep it alive. The other will be if government keeps making massive cutbacks to schools (even in Philadelphia) to eliminate Music Programs for the next generation ? Will there be Rock N' Roll and a clear definition of it?

Posted by STDPhilly69 on Sunday, 05.19.13 @ 15:52pm
--------------------------------------------------
It will definitely continue to be around.

You're forgetting, many rockers learned the "how-to's" of the craft by playing along w/their favorite records. That'll never go away, regardless of any sort of budget cutbacks. Consider those records private tutorials.

In addition, it's a different form of expression. Not everyone will feel moved to express themselves through rap or dance/D.J. culture. This alone guarantees someone will be doing it. And so long as someone wants to play in a live band, there will be someone wanting to put on a show. Don't forget, if you can make a buck off presenting something you like, club owners will always be there.

Question: what rock are you into? Do you like the original 50's music? 60's & 70's? 80's & 90's? Or are you into the post-2000's music?

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 05.20.13 @ 06:44am


NO WAY! This is musical blasphemy. You gotta be kidding. The GAS is God's music, not wild noise for wayward youth. Our Father of Song, the late great FAS, the greatest singer who ever lived, will roll in his grave if he is inducted into the R&R HoF. No, he won't just roll. He'll do gymnastics and then go haunt the offices of Rolling Stone. And I will personally hold a ghost seance and help him.

Posted by Say What? on Saturday, 10.19.13 @ 15:33pm


I was shocked when I saw Sinatra on this list. If Nat King Cole and Louie Armstrong are in then how can Frank Not be?

Posted by pete on Wednesday, 07.15.15 @ 14:04pm


How in the heck is, "Old Blue Eyes" not in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame! This is a tragedy. For a man who was once the biggest show attraction (Until Elvis Presley came on the scene) not in the hall. This makes me question the integrity of those who make the final call of who gets in. I will no longer support, watch or visit the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Call me when Frank gets in!

Posted by kevin withers on Tuesday, 05.16.17 @ 09:28am


Old Blue Eyes is not in because he was anti rock and anti rock and roll and the he turned around and used it to give his record sales a boost.

Andy Williams is much more deserving and integrated with rock and roll and rock.

Posted by Zuzu on Tuesday, 05.16.17 @ 09:39am


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