Woody Guthrie

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer

Category: Early Influence

Inducted in: 1988

Inducted by: Neil Young


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 1991 (ranked #4 in the Influences - Pre-Rock Era category) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Dust Bowl Ballads (1940)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
This Land Is Your Land (1944)
We Shall Be Free (1944)

Woody Guthrie @ Wikipedia

Woody Guthrie Videos

Comments

38 comments so far (post your own)

Today is the 70th anniversary of "This Land is Your Land"'s composition by Woody Guthrie

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Tuesday, 02.23.10 @ 12:55pm


Sorry, but Woody Guthrie (more like Wooden Guthrie, his voice was unbearable) was awful. I can't see how he could be considered a true early influence on rock 'n' roll. I've never actually considered Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Joan Baez, and Joni Mitchell (all of whom were influenced by Wooden Pipes himself) to be true rock 'n' roll either. To me, early influences would be Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, Hank Williams, Sr., and Jimmie Rodgers. Their music had an edge and a grittiness that the folk sissies lacked. Between Woody's whiny voice and political preachiness (protest songs have never been effective), he's one of my most despised musicians.

Posted by Zach on Saturday, 02.11.12 @ 21:07pm


Shouldn't you be following the Republican primaries or something Zach?

Posted by Chalkie on Saturday, 02.11.12 @ 22:26pm


Nope, I'm not a Republican (or a Democrat for that matter). Whatever made you come to that ridiculous assumption? As far as I'm concerned, you have to be a very weak, easily manipulatable person in order buy the BS that conservatives and liberals spew out. Let's keep the politics out, mmkay?

One of the main problems I have with Woody Guthrie, and folk music in general, is that they are far too passive and safe for my tastes. I don't to hear some whiny, acoustic-guitar strumming hippie telling me to give peace a chance . Rock 'n' roll is meant to be aggressive, fun, and dangerous, everything that folk isn't. Whether it's the thrashing piano of Jerry Lee Lewis, the wild stage theatrics of KISS and Alice Cooper, the outrageous vocals of Little Richard, the androgyny of the glam rock movement (think David Bowie, the New York Dolls, Jobriath, etc.), the hip swiveling of Elvis Presley, the agresssive punk of G.G. Allin and the Sex Pistols, or the eerie metal of Black Sabbath and Judas Priest, I like excitement in music.

Woody Guthrie and his compatriots are far too soft. There's no passion or rage in any of their music. The first time I heard This Land is Your Land, I seriously thought I was going to go into a coma. His voice is that atrocious. The same goes for Pete Seeger, Phil Ochs, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Crosby Stills and Nash, and these other whiny, soulless folk pukers.

I'm also against political messages in music because they usually amount to little more than preaching to the choir and don't really have much effect in terms of solving problems. When was the last time that a protest song was directly responsible for changing the course of history? Whatever you do, don't say We Shall Overcome, because it was not the main reason that the civil rights movement succeeded, only a part of it.

I think Alice Cooper summed it best about why politics and rock 'n' roll don't mix. Allow me to quote him:

"I call it treason against rock 'n' roll because rock is the antithesis of politics. Rock should never be in bed with politics. ... When I was a kid and my parents started talking about politics, I'd run to my room and put on the Rolling Stones as loud as I could. So when I see all these rock stars up there talking politics, it makes me sick. .... If you're listening to a rock star in order to get your information on who to vote for, you're a bigger moron than they are. Why are we rock stars? Because we're morons. We sleep all day, we play music at night and very rarely do we sit around reading the Washington Journal."

I couldn't have said it any better myself.

Okay, I'm getting off-topic here, but your ignorant comment struck a major nerve with me.

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 02.12.12 @ 01:01am


Cooper said that because he's a Conservative. Figures you'd like Kiss. Leadbelly beats the shit out of all of them.

Posted by Chalkie on Sunday, 02.12.12 @ 22:16pm



Cooper said that because he's a Conservative. Figures you'd like Kiss. Leadbelly beats the shit out of all of them.

Posted by Chalkie on Sunday, 02.12.12 @ 22:16pm

Yeah, but at least he doesn't mix his personal views with his music. I certainly don't agree with Cooper's personal politics, but that has no influence on my liking his music. Do you not like Alice Cooper?

Leadbelly is okay, but as far as blues goes, Howlin' Wolf is the king. Why are you even comparing KISS and Alice Cooper with Leadbelly? They nothing in common musicially, so the comment "Leadbelly beats the shit out of all of them" is invalid. Next time you're going to say musician A is better than musician B, you might as well use two musicians who share some similarity.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 02.13.12 @ 09:06am


Whoops, I meant to say, "They have nothing in common musicially." Please excuse the typo.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 02.13.12 @ 09:10am


"Yeah, but at least he doesn't mix his personal views with his music."

Music doesn't exist inside a vacuum. Lyrics are going to be politically driven sometimes. Get over it. Clearly you've found other things to listen to.

"Do you not like Alice Cooper?"

Not especially, but there's worse.

"Leadbelly is okay, but as far as blues goes..."

Leadbelly is folk, specifically, folk-blues. Additionally, plenty of his music was political in nature.

"Why are you even comparing KISS and Alice Cooper with Leadbelly?"

Because Leadbelly, a folk musician with politically driven songs was a much greater musician then those in Kiss and Alice Cooper, and was infinitely more important in the development of popular music and music in general.

"They nothing in common musicially, so the comment "Leadbelly beats the shit out of all of them" is invalid. Next time you're going to say musician A is better than musician B, you might as well use two musicians who share some similarity."

Bullshit.

Posted by Chalkie on Monday, 02.13.12 @ 18:12pm


Bullshit.

Posted by Chalkie on Monday, 02.13.12 @ 18:12pm

You may say bullshit, but I say there's no reason to compare musicians with completely different styles. What's next, are you going to compare Beethoven with New Kids on the Block? Gary Numan with the Monkees? Quit while you're behind, peon.

For the record, this debate isn't about who had the greater influence on music or who meant more to the development of music. I never said KISS or Alice Cooper were more influential or important than Leadbelly. Leadbelly is important in his field of music, just as Alice Cooper and KISS are. You're the one who brought it up first, not me, so you're really not accomplishing anything.

"Music doesn't exist inside a vacuum. Lyrics are going to be politically driven sometimes. Get over it. Clearly you've found other things to listen to."

Says you. Mixing politics with music is pure propagandistic brainwashing, whether it be the jingoistic country of Toby Keith or the oversimplified peace brigade of John Lennon. If I want a history lesson, I'l read a book or watch a documentary, provided neither comes from a con-servative or lie-bral perspective (good places to learn true history are Anthony J. Hilder and Jordan Maxwell, for starters.

Just in case you think my music tastes are limited, I have a diverse range of genres and performers whom I like: big band (Glenn Miller, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy), glam rock (David Bowie, Roxy Music, Jobriath, T. Rex, Sweet), rockabilly (Elvis Presley, the Stray Cats, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Holly), punk (The Dead Boys, The Buzzcocks, The Sex Pistols, The Dictators), glam metal (Hanoi Rocks, David Lee Roth-era Van Halen, Motley Crue, Twisted Sisters), blues (Sonny Boy Williamson II, Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, B.B. King), new wave (The Cars, Talking Heads, Human League, Gary Numan), and rhythm & blues (Fats Domino, Ray Charles, Little Richard, Chuck Berry). So don't think I'm some punk whose musical knowledge is limited only to what's popular.

I've read many of your previous posts and you seem to get your jollies off on bullying others. What's the matter, Chalkie? Were you abused as a child? Did you not receive enough love from your parents? Or are you just a pretentious, 24-karat asshole who disagrees with others just for the sake of being a contrarian? My money's on question #3. I've dealt with bullies before in real life, and from what I've observed, they're generally not happy with themselves. You're not going to boss me around with your snide comments. Bring it on. I'll fight back with all I've got.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 02.13.12 @ 19:47pm


I wouldn't take Chalkie's commentary too personally, Zach. He is actually very informed and has a great deal of music knowledge. He does, however, tend to posses the usual highbrow dismissal of music simply on the ground that it's popular or mainstream (like for example, KISS, Grand Funk Railroad, etc) he also isn't shy about shoving his political bias down people's throats (like dumping on right-wingers at every opportunity. Not that I care for right-wingers of course as the whole right/left or liberal/conservative monopoly under the guise of a duopoly is a useless sideshow designed to distract people from real issues, but that's a discussion for another day)

Basically, you just got on his bad side (which he's shown in prior debates on here with Dameon and Jim especially), but he's not a "24 karat asshole" like say, Toby Keith who you mentioned or a AAA hypocrite like Sting an attention seeking w**** like everyone from Madonna (Hell, who am I kidding, it started with Diana Ross) to all her copycat minions today or an insufferable bleeding heart like Sinead O'Connor.

"Mixing politics with music is pure propagandistic brainwashing"

I personally find political messages even more unbearable in film than in music as images have always been a more effective propaganda tool than sound, something big name assembly line filmmakers have milked for all it's worth.

"the oversimplified peace brigade of John Lennon."

I agree, it's amazing how so many people have gotten themselves drunk on John Lennon's excessively indulgent preaching with everything from his hypocritical campaigning of "all you need is love" (when he essentially had everything else) to his painfully naive lyrics in songs like "Imagine." Not saying he wasn't talented, but come on. Then of course there's Yoko Banshee Ono whose awful "music" is usually placed under the "avant-garde" label (which I personally think is a major insult to all avant-garde artists)

If anything, at least both you and Chalkie share one thing in common and that's that you both evidently aren't members of the PC brigade!! (and thank goodness for that!!)

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 02.14.12 @ 08:08am


Oh, a few things I wanted to address in Chalkie's post:

"Music doesn't exist inside a vacuum. Lyrics are going to be politically driven sometimes."

This is true, but there's almost always an agenda as to why the lyrics in question are politically driven.

"Leadbelly, a folk musician with politically driven songs was a much greater musician then those in Kiss and Alice Cooper, and was infinitely more important in the development of popular music and music in general."

Honestly this is more opinion than fact. I'm sure there's plenty of people around here who'd disagree (GFW for instance, sorry for bringing you into this GFW!!!)

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 02.14.12 @ 08:14am


feel free, i love arguments.

I;m fine with a bit of politics in my music. saying you want world peace or something? well i;'m fine with that, everybody wants it apart from maniacs, it's an very agreeable proposition. it's when you got wankers like RATM yelling about "fighting the man" while getting big cheques off Sony.

also Leadbelly may of once been an influence but I can tell ya, lot more kids are listening to kiss and cooper than they are leadbelly, and the kids are the ones who are gonna be making the music of the future.

Posted by GFW on Tuesday, 02.14.12 @ 12:12pm


"Basically, you just got on his bad side (which he's shown in prior debates on here with Dameon and Jim especially)"

My anger towards Chalkie stems mainly from the fact that he made a baseless assumption about my personal beliefs. He said, and I quote, "Shouldn't you be following the Republican primaries or something Zach?" This was in response to my critique of Woody Guthrie, a folk singer known for his left-wing music. It is pretty much common knowledge that I despise both Republicans/conservatives and Democrats/liberals, and would be ticked pink if they all got thrown to the lions and alligators for dinner. When one challenges me in such a snide manner, I am going to respond with fervor.

I too would debate Lead Belly's overall importance in the greater scheme of the music world. I can think of many musicians, bands, performers, and vocals groups that had agreater impact on music, including, but not limited to:

Louis Armstrong
Chuck Berry (the first rock 'n' roll musician to write and record his own songs)
Elvis Presley
The Beatles (not a fan, but I must give them their due)
Glenn Miller
Michael Jackson
Benny Goodman (The first bandleader to include blacks in his ensemble, including Teddy Wilson and Lionel Hampton, to name a few)
Miles Davis (not a fan of his either, but I'll give the devil his due as well)
Ray Charles
Queen (Bohemian Rhapsody was the first song to chart number one in its original form, first on its initial release, then later after the death of Freddie Mercury)
Frank Sinatra
Hank Williams, Sr.

"He does, however, tend to posses the usual highbrow dismissal of music simply on the ground that it's popular or mainstream."

That's such a narrow-mined attitude because a musician's level of notoriety should have little influence on whether they are any good. Today's current crop of Top 40 abominations (Lady Gaga, Nicki Minaj, LMFAO, Flo Rida, etc.) is simply abominable, but the kids are brainwashed into believing that today's popular music actually has any significance. On the flip side, many of the most important figures in music history achieved great fame during their lifetimes and continue to do so today (either dead or alive). Then there are those whose greatest notoriety came after they died (i.e., Howlin' Wolf, Hank Williams, Sr., etc.). The pendulum swings both ways here. There's just as much gold and shit in the underground as there is in the mainstream. All it takes is some detective work to sort it all out.

Posted by Zach on Tuesday, 02.14.12 @ 20:13pm


Thanks for the kind words Tahvo, even if I don't deserve them. I'm choosing to respectfully withdraw from this argument. I grow weary of everything.

Posted by Chalkie on Tuesday, 02.14.12 @ 21:50pm


Thanks for the kind words Tahvo, even if I don't deserve them. I'm choosing to respectfully withdraw from this argument. I grow weary of everything.

Posted by Chalkie on Tuesday, 02.14.12 @ 21:50pm

Well, you're right about one thing: You don't deserve kind words.

Sorry, but I just couldn't help getting in a witty retort. You pretty much asked for it.

Overall, comparing the importance of Lead Belly to KISS or Alice Cooper is entirely pointless because there's really no basis for comparison. Lead Belly is certainly a fine singer/songwriter and guitarist, but he's hardly someone who singlehandedly changed the course of music, popular or otherwise. The impact he's had has been largely posthumous. If you want to talk about musicians who truly had a monumental impact on music, refer to the list I posted earlier*

Anyway, I think this debate has run its course. Let's end it now.

*By no means is that list complete, but it does give a pretty good impression of the artists who have actually mattered to the development of music in the 20th century and beyond.

Posted by Zach on Saturday, 03.17.12 @ 22:26pm


Now here's a musician named Woody who I can dig, and his last name sure as hell ain't Guthrie!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jz6Eqm8WZPc

Posted by Zach on Monday, 03.26.12 @ 22:19pm


Z-Zach I got a confession.

I-I-I kinda like woody guthrie...

Posted by GFW on Wednesday, 06.20.12 @ 13:25pm


The Woody Centennial. One of the towering figures in 20th century music. (Whether Zach likes it or not!).

Oh, and P.S.

Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller and Queen are not more important than Lead Belly (or Guthrie), and that's nearly fact. (Although, Goodman I could accept).

"Peon". That gave me a chuckle or two.

Posted by Chalkie on Wednesday, 06.20.12 @ 21:01pm


No problem, GFW. As much as I despise Woody Guthrie, I don't have a problem with people who enjoy his music. Music is like ice cream: there's enough flavors out there for everyone to choose what they enjoy. Guthrie (and most folk music in general) just doesn't taste all that good to me.

OTOH, I see that my arch-nemesis Chalkdust has crawled out of the primordial ooze to break his earlier promise. I thought you were finished with this debate. I guess that went out the window.

My dislike of Guthrie doesn't cloud my ability to understand the fact that he was a monumental figure in the folk music scene. There's plenty of musicians out there whose music I dislike but I can still respect them for their achievements (i.e. The Beatles, Frank Sinatra, Led Zeppelin, etc.). It doesn't necessarily mean I am obligated to like them because someone told me so. I have my own mind and tastes in music.

You started this fight by making the idiotic assertion that I must be a Republican because I don't like Woody Guthrie. It's amazing how the Internet allows people like you to hide behind their computers and ASSume things about people you've never met in the real world. I already explained how I view lefties and righties with equal rancor. Do I need to reiterate myself?

"'Peon'. That gave me a chuckle or two."

If the shoe fits, wear it. I wasn't going to allow you to walk over me the way you've walked over others. I only came here to express my opinion of Guthrie. When you butted in and made a baseless assumption about me, you pretty much asked for a war. You won't boss me around.

Give it up and move on already. I've said my bit about Wooden Pipes (a fitting nickname for a man who couldn't sing a lick).

Lead Belly was a good songwriter, but I often find his recordings to be subpar. His songs are better when they are covered by other artists. Jerry Lee Lewis's and Little Richard's covers of Goodnight Irene immediately come to mind.

Oh, and as far as musicians named Woody go, I'll take Woody Herman and His Thundering Herd over Woody Guthrie any day of the week.

Posted by Zach on Wednesday, 06.20.12 @ 22:12pm


Zach, I don't think you're a Republican. I think you're more a monarchist/facist :-)

Posted by Paul in KY on Thursday, 06.21.12 @ 08:53am


Thanks for proving my point, Paul. Isn't it great how the Internet allows schmucks like you to hide behind their computers and type patently false things about people they don't even know?

You and Chalkdust deserve each other.

Just for the record, I don't subscribe to any political ideology or party. I refuse to buy into someone else's BS and become another robot who toes the line. The left and the right both need to cease.

Posted by Zachary on Thursday, 06.21.12 @ 09:50am


I'd say by now Queen are becoming more significant to Leadbelly and Woody on music. Y'gotta look at influence by generations, and queens influencing a hell of a lot more people than those two.

Also, Zach a fascist? what the Fu*k?
(also how on earth is Monarchism the same as fascism?)

Posted by GFW on Thursday, 06.21.12 @ 11:13am


Why is it that whenever someone honestly claims they don't subscribe to any one political dictum, it automatically arouses suspicion amongst others? To me it says more about people who can't accept that Zach doesn't have a political agenda than it does about Zach (I mean come ON, first Zach's a Republican and next he's a fascist/monarchist? Seriously?)

I think Zach is just that, Zach. A guy who is passionate about music he loves, and verbal about music he doesn't (and unlike some, he always gives reason as to why he doesn't like a particular artist). ;)

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 06.21.12 @ 11:39am


Sorry, just felt like stepping in.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 06.21.12 @ 11:40am


I think Paul is a sarcastist. Plus, there's a nice reference to Guthrie's guitar in his remark.

Posted by The_Claw on Thursday, 06.21.12 @ 12:11pm


Hey, Claw you're right about the guitar reference! I didn't notice that before.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 06.21.12 @ 13:13pm


Well, if zach was a fascist, then wouldn't listening to Guthrie's stuff kill him?

(actually, why didn't they use Guthrie in WWII? guy would of been a real asset!)

Posted by GFW on Thursday, 06.21.12 @ 14:32pm


GFW, monarchism & facism are essentially the same, because in both cases the supreme ruler is the embodiment of the state. The pomp & circumstance is a bit different.

Zach, I'm so glad you are brave & all that & aren't hiding behind the anonymity of the Intertubes. Since we at least know I'm 'Paul' in the state of Kentucky, whereas you are 'Zachary' wherever the Hell you are.

Posted by Paul in KY on Friday, 06.22.12 @ 14:48pm


Tahvo, I don't believe young Zach when he says he has no political agenda. Does that clear it up for you?

Posted by Paul in KY on Friday, 06.22.12 @ 14:50pm


So you'd rather believe your own twisted delusions than hear me out? You couldn't be any wronger with your "fascist/monarchist" labels. I already told you I don't support or believe in any political ideology, figure or system because they're all equally corrupt. That's my own belief and there's mountains of evidence to support it. Knock it off with your silly assumptions.

Posted by Zach on Friday, 06.22.12 @ 17:17pm


Monarchism and Fascism still ain't the same, nazi germany was hardly similar to medieval britain.

Posted by GFW on Friday, 06.22.12 @ 17:22pm


What Bob Dylan was in the 60s, Woody Guthrie was in the 30s and 40s. He is the most important American folk singer in the first half of the 20th century and the man responsible for tuning folk into a political protest move. In doing so, Woody opened the doors for folk singers like Joan Baez, Judy Collins and Pete Seeger, country artists like Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton and rock singers like The Band, The Byrds and Bruce Springsteen who have moved to voice their opinions in a foreright manner.

The life Woody lived became as famous as the songs he wrote. Pushed by limitless curiosity about the world, he hit the trail during the Great Depression. Traveling around the Midwest and the West Coast, it was from these trips and the people he met that would shape his songs.

Lastly, Woody's most famous song is "This Land is Your Land" but, it is also his most overrated and overplayed song. I prefer songs like "Roll On Columbia", "I Ain't Got No Home", "Dust Bowl Refugees" and "Do Ri Me".

Thanks so much for your great songs, Woody!

Posted by Andrew on Wednesday, 02.20.13 @ 13:34pm


What Bob Dylan was in the 60s, Woody Guthrie was in the 30s and 40s. He is the most important American folk singer in the first half of the 20th century and the man responsible for tuning folk into a political protest move. In doing so, Woody opened the doors for folk singers like Joan Baez, Judy Collins and Pete Seeger, country artists like Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton and rock singers like The Band, The Byrds and Bruce Springsteen who have moved to voice their opinions in a foreright manner.

The life Woody lived became as famous as the songs he wrote. Pushed by limitless curiosity about the world, he hit the trail during the Great Depression. Traveling around the Midwest and the West Coast, it was from these trips and the people he met that would shape his songs.

Lastly, Woody's most famous song is "This Land is Your Land" but, it is also his most overrated and overplayed song. I prefer songs like "Roll On Columbia", "I Ain't Got No Home", "Dust Bowl Refugees" and "Do Ri Me".

Thanks so much for your great songs, Woody!

Posted by Andrew on Wednesday, 02.20.13 @ 13:34pm


What Bob Dylan was in the 60s, Woody Guthrie was in the 30s and 40s. He is the most important American folk singer in the first half of the 20th century and the man responsible for tuning folk into a political protest move. In doing so, Woody opened the doors for folk singers like Joan Baez, Judy Collins and Pete Seeger, country artists like Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton and rock singers like The Band, The Byrds and Bruce Springsteen who have moved to voice their opinions in a foreright manner.

The life Woody lived became as famous as the songs he wrote. Pushed by limitless curiosity about the world, he hit the trail during the Great Depression. Traveling around the Midwest and the West Coast, it was from these trips and the people he met that would shape his songs.

Lastly, Woody's most famous song is "This Land is Your Land" but, it is also his most overrated and overplayed song. I prefer songs like "Roll On Columbia", "I Ain't Got No Home", "Dust Bowl Refugees" and "Do Ri Me".

Thanks so much for your great songs, Woody!

Posted by Andrew on Wednesday, 02.20.13 @ 13:35pm


What Bob Dylan was in the 60s, Woody Guthrie was in the 30s and 40s. He is the most important American folk singer in the first half of the 20th century and the man responsible for tuning folk into a political protest move. In doing so, Woody opened the doors for folk singers like Joan Baez, Judy Collins and Pete Seeger, country artists like Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton and rock singers like The Band, The Byrds and Bruce Springsteen who have moved to voice their opinions in a foreright manner.

The life Woody lived became as famous as the songs he wrote. Pushed by limitless curiosity about the world, he hit the trail during the Great Depression. Traveling around the Midwest and the West Coast, it was from these trips and the people he met that would shape his songs.

Lastly, Woody's most famous song is "This Land is Your Land" but, it is also his most overrated and overplayed song. I prefer songs like "Roll On Columbia", "I Ain't Got No Home", "Dust Bowl Refugees" and "Do Ri Me".

Thanks so much for your great songs, Woody!

Posted by Andrew on Wednesday, 02.20.13 @ 13:35pm


What Bob Dylan was in the 60s, Woody Guthrie was in the 30s and 40s. He is the most important American folk singer in the first half of the 20th century and the man responsible for tuning folk into a political protest move. In doing so, Woody opened the doors for folk singers like Joan Baez, Judy Collins and Pete Seeger, country artists like Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton and rock singers like The Band, The Byrds and Bruce Springsteen who have moved to voice their opinions in a foreright manner.

The life Woody lived became as famous as the songs he wrote. Pushed by limitless curiosity about the world, he hit the trail during the Great Depression. Traveling around the Midwest and the West Coast, it was from these trips and the people he met that would shape his songs.

Lastly, Woody's most famous song is "This Land is Your Land" but, it is also his most overrated and overplayed song. I prefer songs like "Roll On Columbia", "I Ain't Got No Home", "Dust Bowl Refugees" and "Do Ri Me".

Thanks so much for your great songs, Woody!

Posted by Andrew on Wednesday, 02.20.13 @ 13:35pm


alright andrew, calm down.

Posted by GFW on Wednesday, 02.20.13 @ 13:48pm


GFW,

You're right, I did get a little ahead of myself with my comments on Woody Guthrie, but I'll try not to hit the submit comment several times.

Thanks!

Posted by Andrew on Thursday, 02.21.13 @ 12:22pm


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