The Commodores

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1999 (The 2000 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? Yes  what's this?


Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Brick House (1977)
Easy (1977)

The Commodores @ Wikipedia

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Will The Commodores be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

93 comments so far (post your own)

Well she's a BRICK..(duh-duuuuh-duh).....HO--W-W-W-SE!!!
Good stuff too with Easy and Sail On... but not enough to get them into the HOF.

Posted by shawn on Tuesday, 10.23.07 @ 13:48pm


Since Earth, Wind and Fire and the Bee Gees made it, I could see the Commodores getting in.

Posted by Joe on Tuesday, 01.8.08 @ 15:11pm


Commodores are one of the most UNDERATED bands ever.Lionel Richie put the "OW" in funk.I love the Commodores because they do it all funk,gospel,r&b,country and rock.They was a complete band with 3 or 4 lead singers.Its time recognize and put them in the Hall of Fame(Its easy like sunday morning"

Posted by desmond009 on Monday, 12.29.08 @ 21:37pm


It will not be "easy like sunday morning." Sorry desmond, I like The Commodores also, but the only chance they got is IF Lionel Richie reunites with the group and they get back into serious action. Richie has said he wants to do that. Otherwise, Richie would go into Rock Hall as a soloist and Commodores will be left out cold as ico The Miracles.

Posted by Telarock on Monday, 12.29.08 @ 21:58pm


The Commodores

Lionel Richie
Ronald LaPread
Walter Orange
Milan Williams
William King
Thomas McClary
J.D. Nicholas

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 03.4.10 @ 04:31am


How many bands can you name that had a major hit being sung by a member who was not an original member of the group and when the group was inducted, the singer who sung the major hit wasn't included as an inductee?

THOSE INDUCTED:

01. Timothy B. Schmidt: Inducted with the Eagles in 1997. He was with the Eagles for only 17 years when they were inducted. He sang the Eagles hit, "I Can't Tell You Why" from 1980 and "Love Will Keep Us Alive" from 1994.

02. Sammy Hagar: Inducted with Van Halen in 2007. He was with Van Halen for 22 years when they got inducted. He sang many of Van Halen's hits.

WILL THEY BE INDUCTED?-YES!:

01. J.T. Taylor: Kool & the Gang first charted in 1969. J.T. Taylor joined the group in 1978 and sang lead on all the groups hits from that point on, which included Celebration, Too Hot, Get Down On It, Cherish, Joanna and others. It's been over 25 years since he joined the group.

02. J.D. Nicholas: After Lionel Richie left the Commodores in 1981, The Commodores released 3 more studio albums between 1983 and 1987 and they scored 8 more hits with drummer Walter Clyde Orange singing lead along with Lionel Richie's replacement J.D. Nicholas. Their biggest hit was "Nightshift" in 1985. J.D. Nicholas was from the group Heatwave. Nicholas was with the Commodores for 5 years and then they stopped producing albums.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 04.25.10 @ 14:34pm


http://www.vocalgrouphalloffame.com/inductees/the_commodores.html

THE 2003 VOCAL GROUP HALL OF FAME

The Commodores want you to know that their friend and comrade, Lionel Richie left the band seventeen years in 1983. They want you to know that the Commodores, despite a string of monster hits and massive tours in the late 70’s and early 80’s, won their first Grammy Award for the multi-platinum smash single and LP "Night Shift" in 1986. Most of all, they want you to know that the Commodores are alive and well in the 90’s, with their own label, and five new albums in stores.

From the beginning at Tuskegee Institute in 1968, the Commodores were known as "smart guys". But they were too funky, too. Smart and funky enough to open for the Jackson 5, to be discovered by Berry Gordy in the process, and to sell more than 60 million records for Motown. They were its largest selling act for two decades, the 70’s and 80’s. The Commodores racked up a string of hits like "Machine Gun", "Brick House", "Easy", "Three Times A Lady", "Sail On", "Oh No", "Slippery When Wet", "To Hot To Trot", and many others that literally moved an entire generation. Success, however was not enough to save them from the changes in the music scene, or most especially, the music business. The departure in 1983 of Lionel Richie, co-lead vocalist along with Walter "Clyde" Orange, might have sunk a lesser group. The Commodores continued onward, and entered the studio to begin recording "Commodores 13".

In 1894, before recording "Night Shift", the Commodores decided to re-establish the co-lead vocal formula that had catapulted them to the top of the R&B and Pop Charts in the past. After interviewing over fifty candidates, the Commodores decided on JD Nicholas. JD was the led vocalist for Heat Wave, the Commodores opening act on their previous European tour. The match was perfect. The success of "Night Shift" proved it.

Rounded out by the world-renowned rhythm section the "mean Machine", the Commodores hit the road in support of their new record. The tour had sold out shows with both new and old fans on their feet, singing and dancing to new Commodores songs and classic hits. The Commodores has silenced the critics and climbed to the top of the pop charts once again.

After the release of "Night Shift", the term of the Commodores recording agreement with Motown came to an end and the band entertained offers from every major record label in the business. The best offer came from Polydor, which was in the process of forming it’s own Black Music department. After 2 fruitless LPs in the late 80’s, and a growing confusion and lack of direction at the label, the Commodores asked for and received a release from their obligations to Polydor.

The old saying, "things happen for a reason", was especially true for the Commodores during the period that followed the departure from Polydor. Their change in status to an "unsigned" group focused their attention and talents. Together with their manager David Fish, the Commodores set about taking control of their career in an unprecedented fashion.

The first step was to regain control of their material. Motown’s refusal to grant master use licenses to the Commodores for there planned greatest hit records turned out to be a blessing in disguise.

In 1991, the Commodores, Walter "Clyde" Orange, William "Wak" King and James Dean "JD" Nicholas, began the mammoth undertaking of creating all new digital recordings of the Commodores classic hits. Using the best digital recording technology available, the first step in assuming total control of their future was accomplished.

Recording sessions from late 91 through 92 produced enough material for four new albums. The first is a two disc, separate volume set entitled "Commodores Hits Vol.I" and "Commodores Hits Vol.II". This will be the first truly comprehensive hits package available on the Commodores that will include all the band’s highest charting singles in chronological order from their early days through "Night Shift" and the Polydor period.

The new digital recordings of such classics as "Three Times A Lady", "Still", "Lady (You Bring Me Up)", and many other sound impressively like the original cuts with JD and Clyde alternating on vocals.

An LP’s worth of Christmas material entitled "Commodores Christmas", filled with covers of traditional Yuletide songs and soon-to-be-classic original songs for the season, was also completed during the extensive recording sessions. But perhaps most importantly, the sessions resulted in an album of all new material entitled "Commodores XX – No Tricks", which is the bands twentieth studio album. It includes a new musical and vocal arrangement of the smash hit "Brick House" entitled "Brick House 93".

With four records ‘in the can’, there was only one thing missing – a label. Rather than relinquish control of their careers to the ‘one hit wonder’ major label and distribution system of today where priorities change hourly, and perhaps suffer the same fate that befell the and at Polydor, the Commodores decided to form their own record company. Announced in August of 1992, Commodores Records Entertainment came into being. It was the final step in maintaining full and total control over their music and career that the band had desired for some time.

Signing a series of domestic and international publishing, licensing, and distribution agreements through the new Company, the Commodores released "Commodores Hits Vol.I", "Commodores Hits Vol.II", "Commodores Christmas" and Commodores XX – No Tricks."

The Group recorded and filmed their live performances during the 1996 US Tour. The resulting efforts have produced "Commodores Live" CD and TV special. The band is currently working in new material for their next CD.

With the new discs, new tour, and a new label, the Commodores have maintained their place among the most successful entertainers in the world. Their new careers as entrepreneurs, as well as performers bring the boys from Tuskegee full circle. Bring the talent and experience of three decades of writing, producing, and performing hit music to a whole new generation of fans, the Commodores are proving once again that heir future is as bright as their past.

Known for such hits as "Just to Be Close to You," "Easy," and "Brickhouse," to name a few, the Commodores were one of the top bands during their long tenure at Motown. The group is credited with seven number one songs and a host of other Top Ten numbers on the Billboard charts. They also have a vast music catalog that has generated more than 50 albums, and the recordings continue to be in demand.

The members of the Commodores, all of whom attended Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, came together as a result of two groups disbanding: the Mystics and the Jays. Initially formed to simply play music as a pastime and to meet girls, the lineup consisted of William King (trumpet), Thomas McClary (guitar), Ronald LaPread (bass), Walter "Clyde" Orange (drums), Lionel Richie (saxophone), and Milan Williams (keyboards). The members nearly went stir-crazy trying to pick a name for the group, but to no avail. As a last resort, Orange gave King a dictionary and told him to pick a name, and that name was the Commodores. With the only learned musician in the group being Clyde Orange, the Commodores began spreading their music throughout their regional base, which included Tuskegee, Montgomery, and Birmingham, AL. After experiencing success in securing dates in their own backyard, the band ventured to New York City for a gig at the Smalls Paradise club. They were told, in so many words by the club owner, that their sound was not happening. However, a short time later the self-contained band was called back to the club to fill-in for a last minute cancellation. That night the Tuskegee alumni performed before a standing-room-only crowd. Most of the crowd were friends and family of the band. Unaware of the planned crowd, the owner booked ...

Posted by Roy on Friday, 08.27.10 @ 20:20pm


THE 1994 SONGWRITERS HALL OF FAME (Lionel Richie)
THE 2003 HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME (Lionel Richie)
THE 2003 VOCAL GROUP HALL OF FAME (The Commodores)

Posted by Roy on Friday, 08.27.10 @ 20:54pm


ARTISTS WHO WERE INDUCTED INTO THE VOCAL GROUP HALL OF FAME AND RECEIVED A STAR ON THE HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME IN THE SAME YEAR:

01. 2003 - Lionel Richie (The Commodores)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 11.14.10 @ 20:20pm


Since it's likely Lionel Richie's only way of getting in, I'd have no problem with their induction.

Posted by Jim on Wednesday, 12.29.10 @ 19:13pm


The Commodores

01. Lionel Richie (vocals, saxophone, drums, piano)
02. Thomas McClary (lead guitar)
03. Milan Williams (keyboards, trombone, rhythm guitar)
04. William King (trumpet, rhythm guitar, synthesizer)
05. Ronald LaPread (bass guitar, trumpet)
06. Walter Orange (vocals, drums)
07. J.D. Nicholas (vocals)

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 02.27.13 @ 19:51pm


Re: J.D. Nicholas:

I don't think he'll get in . I think that The Hall will probably focus on the six original members of The Commodores, and Nicholas will get the shaft.I hope not, but look at another Motown group, The Miracles. The six originals (Smokey and Claudette Robinson, Bobby Rogers, Pete Moore,Ronnie White, and Marv Tarplin),got inducted, while Billy Griffin got shafted...despite the fact that Griffin led on the biggest single (the # 1 hit "Love Machine"),and Album (The Platinum "City Of Angels"),the group ever had. He also led on the million-seller "Do It Baby" and the Top 10 R&B hit, "Don't-Cha Love It". Griffin recorded 7 albums with the group,5 for Motown, and two for Columbia) ...and he STILL didn't get in. If Billy didn't, J.D. probably won't either.

Posted by Bill G. on Monday, 03.11.13 @ 23:15pm


The Commodores

01. Lionel Richie (1968-1977: vocals, saxophone, drums, piano)
02. Thomas McClary (1968-Present: lead guitar)
03. Milan Williams (1968-1989: keyboards, trombone, rhythm guitar)
04. William King (1968-Present: trumpet, rhythm guitar, synthesizer)
05. Ronald LaPread (1968-1985: bass guitar, trumpet)
06. Walter Orange (1968-Present: vocals, drums)
07. J.D. Nicholas (1985-Present: vocals; Heatwave)

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 05.23.13 @ 10:33am


The Commodores as a GROUP should get in FIRST. Lionel Richie's SOLO career, while emormously successful,was far too "Popish" (during the height of his solo career, he was called "The Black Barry Manilow").

Is Barry Manilow in the Hall of Fame ?

(See my point?)

As with Dion & The Belmonts, sometimes the ship only sails ONCE. If that is going to happen...it should be for ALL of the Commodores: Lionel Richie, Ron LaPread, the late Milan Williams,Walter "Clyde" Orange,Tommy McCleary,and William "WAK" King.

NOT LIONEL RICHIE SOLO.

As I've said before, let's not create still ANOTHER situation where a Special Committee has to come in to correct a mistake that NEVER should have been made in the FIRST PLACE.

The COMMODORES ?? YES !!

Lionel Richie solo?? (maybe later) .

Posted by Bill G on Thursday, 09.5.13 @ 11:14am


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5EmnQp3V48

****The COMMODORES****

Two of the BIGGEST hits that The Commodores EVER HAD ...WERE NOT EVEN LED BY LIONEL RICHIE !!

Like "BRICK HOUSE" .

Walter "Clyde" Orange sang lead on THAT.

Lionel was playing sax in the BACKGROUND on THAT one .

And Brick House" is their SIGNATURE song ...and their biggest-selling hit WORLDWIDE.

...and , since ALL of The Commodores WROTE the song, WHY should Richie get singled out ...and go into the Hall ALONE...WITHOUT HIS BANDMATES ??

(in THIS case , the word "band" is correct) .



Posted by Bill G on Thursday, 09.5.13 @ 11:36am


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrkEDe6Ljqs

Lionel Richie didn't even sing lead on their SECOND most recognizable hit...the Grammy-winning "NIGHT SHIFT".

Walter "Clyde" Orange sand lead on THAT one TOO !!

(in a duet with Richie's replacement, J.D. Nicolas)

So, since The Commodores 2 all-time biggest WORLWIDE hits...

WEREN'T EVEN LED BY LIONEL RICHIE...

How in the WORLD can he go in solo, WITHOUT the GROUP ??

Posted by Bill G on Thursday, 09.5.13 @ 11:44am


Why does the Rock Hall prefer The Meters, War and The Spinners over Kool and the Gang and the Commodores? I don't think we will be seeing Kool and the Gang and the Commodores on the ballot until the Spinners, the Meters and War are inducted. They will need a couple of black groups to replace the ones they prefer after they have been inducted.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 06:22am


"Why does the Rock Hall prefer The Meters, War and The Spinners over Kool and the Gang and the Commodores? I don't think we will be seeing Kool and the Gang and the Commodores on the ballot until the Spinners, the Meters and War are inducted. They will need a couple of black groups to replace the ones they prefer after they have been inducted."

Posted by Roy


WHY ? The Rock Hall hasn't had any problem ignoring Black R&B groups up till now . In recent years, I can count on one hand the number of R&B groups that have gotten in :

2013: 0

2012: Miracles , Famous Flames, Midnighters

(and THEY were inducted to correct past mistakes that the Non Com THEMSELVES made)

2011 : 0

2010 : 0

2009 : Little Anthony & The Imperials

2008 : 0

2007 : 0

(Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five are NOT R&B, and, IMO, shouldn't have been inducted in the FIRST PLACE...especially not sooner than legendary groups like The Miracles, Midnighters, Imperials, and The Famous Flames)

2006 : 0

2005 : The O"Jays




That's only Five R&B groups in the last NINE years .

Nominated but Rejected : The Meters, The Spinners,The Marvelettes, WAR, Chaka Khan & Rufus...

And WHO KNOWS who else.

That's a BAD track record.

Kinda makes you wonder, doesn't it.

The only Black acts that have gotten inducted in recent years are "fringe" acts- that is , artists who are Black ...but are NOT R&B : Rap, Disco, Blues, Reggae, etc.

And people wonder just WHY there is a need for an R&B Hall of Fame .

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 13:43pm


"The only Black acts that have gotten inducted in recent years are "fringe" acts- that is , artists who are Black ...but are NOT R&B : Rap, Disco, Blues, Reggae, etc."

Did you seriously just imply those genres are "fringe" compared to R&B?

Posted by GFW on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 14:35pm


Did you seriously just imply those genres are "fringe" compared to R&B?

I've got a better question than THAT. How do YOU explain my previous point ?

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 14:51pm


....The fact is...YOU CAN'T.

And neither can the Rock Hall voters.

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 14:52pm


With the great number of deserving classic R&B groups still out there NOT inducted...

How can they just BYPASS them ALL...

...and go straight artists that are on the FRINGE (yes, that's what I said) of Black Music ?

None of those inducted acts are identified as R&B . Offshoots, yes. Precursors,yes, I'll grant that. But none of them are traditional R&B-identified acts. And NONE of them are R&B GROUPS.

...any questions ?

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 15:03pm


"The only Black acts that have gotten inducted in recent years are "fringe" acts- that is , artists who are Black ...but are NOT R&B : Rap, Disco, Blues, Reggae, etc."

Bill, it's clear that you're not getting enough oxygen inside your bubble.

Wow.

Posted by DarinRG on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 16:28pm


Oh my god Bill are you kidding me.

Right, let's have a look at those genres, eh?

Rap: Rap is probably the mist popular black-dominated genre for the past 30 years.
Blues - The Blues predate your beloved R&B by decades, and is the biggest influence in the beginning of rock and roll. Hell, "Rhythm And BLUES" It's in the name!
Disco: This is by no means a "black" genre. Not to mention, there's barely any disco artists in!
Reggae: Is Marley and Cliff seriously too much for you?

The pioneers of these genres are FAR more important than any R&B artists not in.

Posted by GFW on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 16:39pm


"Oh my god Bill are you kidding me.

Right, let's have a look at those genres, eh?

Rap: Rap is probably the mist popular black-dominated genre for the past 30 years.
Blues - The Blues predate your beloved R&B by decades, and is the biggest influence in the beginning of rock and roll. Hell, "Rhythm And BLUES" It's in the name!
Disco: This is by no means a "black" genre. Not to mention, there's barely any disco artists in!
Reggae: Is Marley and Cliff seriously too much for you?

The pioneers of these genres are FAR more important than any R&B artists not in. "

You are looking at this issue from YOUR vantage point , that is,from someone who was not even born when R&B was popular on the airwaves. So I can't expect you to see the importance of R&B. when you weren't even here.

""The only Black acts that have gotten inducted in recent years are "fringe" acts- that is , artists who are Black ...but are NOT R&B : Rap, Disco, Blues, Reggae, etc."

"Bill, it's clear that you're not getting enough oxygen inside your bubble".

Let's go back to the original conversation between Roy and I.

He mentioned " R&B GROUPS. I ,in answer, discussed R&B GROUPS.

Talking about Black non R&B artists and non-GROUPS is effectively avoiding the issue.

Is Donna Summer a GROUP?

How about Freddie King ?

Albert King ?

(not when last I looked)

Is Jimmy Cliff ?

Little Walter ?

None of these artists were a part of the issue at hand ...because NONE of them are R&B GROUPS.

...And R&B groups were what Roy and I were talking about.

Any questions ?

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 16:58pm


With the great number of deserving classic R&B groups still out there NOT inducted...

How can they just BYPASS them ALL...

...and go straight artists that are on the FRINGE (yes, that's what I said) of Black Music ?

None of those inducted acts are identified as R&B . Offshoots, yes. Precursors, yes, I'll grant that. But none of them are traditional R&B-identified acts. And NONE of them are R&B GROUPS.

...any questions ?


Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 15:03pm
--------------------------------------------------
Bill - I am not necessarily the biggest fan of hip-hop, but even I couldn't say it was a "fringe" music. I agree that there's little classic R&B in hip-hop, but a younger generation sees them as the inheritors of older R&B (right or wrong). There's a very interesting article in the Thursday edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer on R&B stations in the Philly market. It talks of how one station is switching over to a classic format, and whether this is a good idea or not. You might be interested to check it out, perhaps online, when you have a free minute.

One thing I did want to ask - you speak of "traditionally identified" R&B groups. When do you date this "traditional" factor? I'm not asking in a nasty way. It just strikes me that you listed Little Anthony & the Imperials above, yet they run concurrent to a Howlin' Wolf, and a Bo Diddley, and even a Nat King Cole, who all shared the R&B charts in the 50's. I'm simply curious, that's all.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 17:31pm


"One thing I did want to ask - you speak of "traditionally identified" R&B groups. When do you date this "traditional" factor? I'm not asking in a nasty way. It just strikes me that you listed Little Anthony & the Imperials above, yet they run concurrent to a Howlin' Wolf, and a Bo Diddley, and even a Nat King Cole, who all shared the R&B charts in the 50's. I'm simply curious, that's all."

Well, Cheesecrop, I'll be happy to answer that. You see , Little Anthony & The Imperials started in the late 50's,but they continued to chart well into the mid '70's as well.

And, in several published interviews, Anthony made clear that the Imperials were an "R&B group" Not a "Doo-Wop" group...in fact, The Imperials DETEST the "Doo-Wop" label.

The Imperials survived the so-called "Doo-Wop" era, the R&B/ Soul era, the concurrent "British Invasion" Era...

And they're still touring today. (In fact, I'm going to see them later this month).

They also survived the "Bo Diddley" and "Howling Wolf" eras too. (LOL)

Secondly, although it's true that RAP is the predominate genre of Black Music today,(and I'm NOT denying that, GFW), There are several radio stations nationwide that have dropped it from their playlists, and are going back to R&B (usually the ones NOT owned by Clear Channel). PBS has also taken up the fight.. with it's now-famous Doo-Wop and R&B Specials .

As far as most music historians have estimated , traditional R&B began to disappear sometime around 1980...or a little before. It was felled by the 1-2-3 punch of Disco,Funk, and finally Rap.

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 18:07pm


...And, i'll be sure to check out that article in the Philadelphia Inquirer. Thanks !!

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 18:10pm


Honest question Bill, just asking your opinion: would Boyz II Men be considered a "traditional R&B group" since they carry a lot of that style with their sound? Because that's an R&B group I'd like to see get inducted someday, too.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 18:10pm


Honest question Bill, just asking your opinion: would Boyz II Men be considered a "traditional R&B group" since they carry a lot of that style with their sound? Because that's an R&B group I'd like to see get inducted someday, too.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 18:10pm


"Honest question Bill, just asking your opinion: would Boyz II Men be considered a "traditional R&B group" since they carry a lot of that style with their sound? Because that's an R&B group I'd like to see get inducted someday, too."

I would say "kinda sorta". They don't fit the timeline..but they DO have many of the characteristics of classic R&B groups.

Maybe one day they WILL get in ...but judging by the Hall's track record in inducting R&B groups over the last several years....don't hold your breath.

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 18:40pm


...And for those who disagree with what I'm saying about classic R&B groups, I say, don't argue with ME...look at the TRACK RECORD . It's right there in front of you. R&B groups just AREN'T getting in .

I'll be very happy if the Spinners or The Marvelettes get in ...but I'M not holding MY breath.

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 18:45pm


What's even scarier is...if you eliminate the 3 classic R&B groups inducted by Special Committee (Miracles, Midnighters, Famous Flames) which were NOT decided on by the voters, it reveals a more ominous fact: That in the last 9 YEARS , only 2 Classic R&B groups were actually inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by the Voting Body.

**** only two ****

(The O"Jays & The Imperials)

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 18:55pm


"only 2 Classic R&B groups were actually inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by the Voting Body.

**** only two ****

(The O"Jays & The Imperials)"

(This is REALLY COOL if you're SAMMY STRAIN, because he was a member of , and was inducted WITH...BOTH groups. But, it doesn't bode well for any of the OTHERS).

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 09.6.13 @ 19:10pm


news.yahoo.com/rock-roll-hall-fame-becoming-racist-170700082.html

These disturbing stats on the part of the Rock Hall coupled with the Hall's failure to correct this situation, caused the appearance of the above article, dated Dec. 8, 2011...

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 11:43am


Bill G,

That is a pretty good article. And it does point to a Hall that is forgetting some of its core styles. Though I disagree with the 5th dimension part of it. I really don't think anyone thought they were very "cool" when they were around. Catchy as anything could be, but never considered truly talented until they broke away from each other. Especially McCoo and Davis.

The hall has been slacking on R&B nominations lately. There are plenty of groups and solo artists out there to choose from. Although Percy Sledge and Bobby Womack may not have been the best picks for representation of the genre.It is strange that the hurdle is there for the style, especially when you consider R&B's lasting popularity over the decades.

I do wonder what they are going to do as the 90s come in, and the new R&B artists come up for induction. The two generations are going to collide, and I really have no idea who will break through into the Hall. They will all have to overcome the Hall's apparent bias, and then fight over whatever R&B spot is available that year.

It seems with every less that qualified induction the Hall adds to it's list of snubs. That has now snowballed to create a big roster of artists not in (of all styles), and the problem seems to be growing every year.

Posted by Chris F. on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 15:17pm


I totally AGREE Chris .

And , that's why I say , once you PASS the Motown/Stax/Atlantic/Chess Eras of the 1960's ...

R&B inductions get SHAMEFULLY spotty.

These non-inducted artists of the late 60-late 70's , the artists of the "Soul Train Era", just aren't getting in....

And among them are some of the greatest music artists of all time !!

And , as for 80's RAP/Hip-Hop artists...

Although many of them are innovative, the great majority`of them employ music that is derivative.

***Where do they get their samples from??***

****RHYTHM & BLUES****

I can site you cases by the score...of numerous Rap and Hip-Hop tunes that have borrowed the music, the beats, even the LYRICS, from classic R&B tunes.

Since WHEN is the imitator more talented or influential than the INNOVATOR ??

If these artists take R&B tunes , change them around, and release them under THEIR OWN NAMES...

Since WHEN does that make them more talented than the R&B artist or group....

That ORIGINATED that song in the FIRST PLACE ??

...And, since WHEN should that very Rap/Hip-Hop artist get into the Hall...
AHEAD of the very artists WHO'S MUSIC THEY SAMPLED TO GET THERE ??

I don't know about YOU.. But I think that there's something VERY WRONG in that.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 17:02pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VutAWCzUuoI

In 1973, The MIRACLES released a song entitled..

"GIVE ME JUST ANOTHER DAY"

Smokey had left the group by then, and had been replaced with Billy Griffin.

This song was not a hit, and barely scraped the charts...
But WHO could have guessed what would happen NEXT....

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 17:13pm


****"GIVE ME JUST ANOTHER DAY"****

(from Wikipedia)

"Give Me Just Another Day" (T54240F) is a song written by Leon Ware and released as a single in 1973 by Motown R&B group The Miracles, issued on that label's Tamla Records subsidiary. It was the first single release from the group's upcoming album, Do It Baby, which was released the following year.
The second single release by the group featuring new lead singer Billy Griffin, who had replaced the group's original lead singer Bill "Smokey" Robinson, the song was written by Motown staff songwriter Leon Ware, who, up until this point, had written and composed for several Motown acts, including Marvin Gaye, The Isley Brothers, Michael Jackson, and Junior Walker & the All Stars, among others .
Hal Davis was the song's producer, and it was arranged by James Carmichael, who went on to become one of the main architects behind the success of Motown group The Commodores later in the decade.There were two different mixes of the song. The single release features the background vocals by Miracles Bobby Rogers, Pete Moore, and Ronnie White much more prominently than the album version, giving it more of a "group" feel,while the album mix barely features their vocals at all, almost making it seem like a Billy Griffin "solo" performance.
This song was not a big success, failing to reach the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 11 on the Bubbling Under chart, and reached No. 47 on the Billboard R&B chart.
Despite this song's initial chart failure,however, it has since gained new life and become a valuable part of the Motown Catalogue as a much-covered and sampled song by hip-hop artists, including Young Jeezy, Schoolboy Q, Jay-Z, Marco Polo, Wade Waters, Christina Milian, and Rick Ross.

...Do you see what I mean ?

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 17:16pm


Now. take THAT scenario...

And MULTIPLY it A THOUSAND TIMES.....

And , you'll see just HOW MUCH RAP/Hip-Hop owes ...

to RHYTHM & BLUES.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 17:20pm


So, although Rap/Hip-Hop may be the dominate form of Black Music TODAY...

It's ROOTS...

...ARE UNMISTAKABLE !!!

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 17:27pm


I was never denying the influence of R&B on Rap, I was taking umbrage at your labelling of rap as a "fringe genre"

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 17:39pm


I don't think anyone can counter that Hip Hop has taken a large dose of R&B and used it to become the dominant style of Rock for the bast 20 or so years. But then again that is the beauty of Rock'N'Roll as a whole. You take a little of this, some of that, and create something else. It is a cocktail of styles and influences. And in the end aren't all styles of music derivative of some other style? Even R&B springs out of Jump Blues, Gospel, and Jazz. And they all have their roots in even older styles. Hip Hop is a sampling style of music. But I think it is more in homage to those great acts of the 60s and 70s than a true rip off. Rap acts take older music and make it relevant to a new generation. It will never be as good to people who love and cherish R&B like you and I. Yet there is a large amount of respect from the younger generation towards that music when they sample it.

I think there is room for both in the Hall. There hasn't been an undeserving Rap act inducted yet. And I don't see that happening for years truthfully. I think that the generation that grew up with 2Pac and Jay Z will look back at the hall in 20 years and ask the same question we are asking about R&B. Where are the second tier acts? The Hall to us has the Temptations, Supremes, Four Tops, Imperials, O'Jays, the Pips, Miracles, Midnighters, and so on. There are still a few top tier legends not in (The Orioles, The Clovers, the Dominoes, The Spinners, etc..). But what we are really looking at are the second tier, just as wonderful but not quite as legendary. It would be less frustrating if the Hall would quit popping in their pet projects. Percy Sledge shouldn't have been in before Joe Tex. Laura Nyro shouldn't be in until about 20 other females have been inducted.

The Hip Hop generation is going to look back and be asking the same questions.

As for originating songs. Jerry Lee Lewis is in, Big Maybelle is not. Aretha got in before Otis. James Brown and The Mamas and The Papas are, but not the 5 Royales. There are plenty of examples. Everybody borrows and steals in this dysfunctional Rock family.

Covers and Samples are vital parts of Rock. I mean Gloria Jones had Tainted Love, then Soft Cell made it the massive hit it is, and decades later it was Rihanna who samples it in S.O.S. If anything samples and covers add to the legacy of an act. Enhancing their chances of getting represented in the Hall and being remembered by the general populace. No matter how much of an insult it may seem to fans like us that some act gets in before one from traditional R&B, as long as they deserve to be there it is okay. The problem is the acts that don't deserve it.

Posted by Chris F. on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:00pm


"I was never denying the influence of R&B on Rap, I was taking umbrage at your labelling of rap as a "fringe genre"".

I don't think he was doing that. I think he was saying that rap was on the fringes of R&B, not that rap itself was a fringe genre.

Posted by Dezmond on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:09pm


"The pioneers of these genres are FAR more important than any R&B artists not in. "

I think that you also believe that RAP and it's artists are more important historically.They're not.

You have to understand, that if Rap/Hip-Hop sells more records today, than R&B did back "in the day", the reason is that of changing demographics in our society. Today, there are simply MORE PEOPLE in the United States than there were 40-50 years ago. So, it would be much easier for a Rap record to sell a million copies today, than it would be for an R&B record to do so in the Sixties. Also, R&B artists back then had to battle TREMENDOUS odds to get radio airplay...and had to deal with far more bigotry in the music industry than artists do today, just to get HALF the recognition that White Artists got.

That's the very reason why I don't buy the line that The Beatles were the greatest group of all time...If they had been black, the Beatles would have received NOWHERE NEAR the fame ,glory, accolades, or money that they eventually got. And, if the Miracles had been White...you KNOW what would have happened. The Beatles had far greater opportunities for success...and didn't have to deal with the racism that Black artists did back then.

Today, it's a different story.If Rap & Hip/Hop artists today have the wherewithal to start clothing lines,perfume lines, get TV ,book and movie deals,etc. It is because of the groundbraking efforts of R&B artists of 50 years ago that PUT THEM in that position. R&B Artists back them simply didn't have access to those opportunites.

That's why , you can't just look at Pop Chart Positions back then of an artist's worth or influence...Some of the greatest artists of all-time barely made a dent in the Pop Charts.

And,had it not been for R&B...there would have been NO RAP.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:10pm


...And yes, Chris, there IS room for both in the Hall. The Problem is, in recent years , R&B artists JUST AREN'T GETTING IN THERE.

....Only the voters know why.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:18pm


Bill G,

I think we all know why. The voting body isn't the most educated group on any style outside of Popular 60s acts. Because of that everything else is suffering. I don't know when they picked up the required Singer-Songwriter slot and dropped the necessary R&B slot.

Posted by Chris F. on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:21pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_bQ6-zrM7U

Anyway, I don't want to do stand on the soapbox and do a lecture on The Commodores' site...so, here is one of their biggest hits (that Lionel Richie actually DID sing lead on)....1976's Top Ten smash,"Just to Be Close to You"

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:23pm


Wow. i just looked at this video. It looks like "Clyde" did co-lead vocals on THIS one TOO !!!

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:28pm


"Bill G,

I think we all know why. The voting body isn't the most educated group on any style outside of Popular 60s acts. Because of that everything else is suffering. I don't know when they picked up the required Singer-Songwriter slot and dropped the necessary R&B slot."

Posted by Chris F.

Yeah, Chris...I don't know EITHER. It sure would be nice if they brought it BACK.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:30pm


""I was never denying the influence of R&B on Rap, I was taking umbrage at your labelling of rap as a "fringe genre"".

I don't think he was doing that. I think he was saying that rap was on the fringes of R&B, not that rap itself was a fringe genre."

Posted by Dezmond

Yes, Dez...that's exactly what I meant. Sorry if I didn't clarify.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:33pm


..That's also exactly why I think that the Special Committee should be an ongoing and permanent part of the Rock Hall. As the median age of the voters gets progressively younger, those voters simply WON'T KNOW or CAN'T REMEMBER the importance or impact of earlier acts . So, in addition to inducting groups left out when their lead singers were inducted, the Special Committee should evaluate and induct important earlier acts of the 40's 50's 60's and 70's that haven't , so far, gotten in...including Early Influence act like Sinatra,Ella,Nat,Cab, etc.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:42pm


...and Tony Bennett...one of the all-time greats !!!

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:43pm


Alright, nevermind. Apparently Bill G does feel that way about rap.

I hate to be a defender of The Beatles, but Bill G, what you said was patently absurd. They were the most important group of that era for rock and roll. They changed the entire sonic and production landscape. Almost every rock group of that era were effected by them, either inspired by and challenged by, or tried to differentiate themselves, but they were all reacting to them. I'm not even a big Beatles fan,but Jesus Christ, man, take off the Motown goggles for a moment and see the whole picture.

And yes, I know this isn't The Beatles page, but I couldn't let that comment go. OK, I am ready for the ALL CAPS barrage.

Posted by dezmond on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:52pm


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Womack

"The hall has been slacking on R&B nominations lately. There are plenty of groups and solo artists out there to choose from. Although Percy Sledge and Bobby Womack may not have been the best picks for representation of the genre."

While I'm in total agreement with you on Percy Sledge, I think that Bobby Womack was definitely a good call...due to his long string of hit records, songwriting, session work at a guitarist, records as lead singer of The Valentinos, (his brothers),and other industry milestones. Sledge didn't do a TENTH of what Bobby did.Bobby deserved it. Percy didn't.

...As far as I'm concerned , Lou Rawls,or Barry White should have gotten HIS spot....or maybe even Johnnie Taylor.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:02pm


"
Alright, nevermind. Apparently Bill G does feel that way about rap.

I hate to be a defender of The Beatles, but Bill G, what you said was patently absurd. They were the most important group of that era for rock and roll. They changed the entire sonic and production landscape. Almost every rock group of that era were effected by them, either inspired by and challenged by, or tried to differentiate themselves, but they were all reacting to them. I'm not even a big Beatles fan,but Jesus Christ, man, take off the Motown goggles for a moment and see the whole picture.

And yes, I know this isn't The Beatles page, but I couldn't let that comment go. OK, I am ready for the ALL CAPS barrage."

No "all caps", Dez.

But (and I know that this is a stretch), try to imagine that The Beatles were Black. Do you think that ,despite their obvious talent, given the racial climate in the U.S. that they would have STILL gotten as big as they eventually did?

Be honest.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:09pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUQOThXDQDc

****The COMMODORES****

Believe it or not....their first million-seller was with an INSTRUMENTAL !!!

"MACHINE GUN" (1974)

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:14pm


That is a fair point, and you are probably right (on the black Beatles scenario). Very interesting what if. But that still doesn't take away what they accomplished. Love "Machine Gun," by the way.

Posted by dezmond on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:19pm


I'm not saying rap is more important than R&B. I'm saying that if you're going to induct the top acts of R&B, then there's n odecent reason you can't do the same for rap.

Also you should know by now that when it comes to this site I'm one of the least concerned with sales, so not sure what the whole thing about Rap selling more was about.

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:20pm


Covers and Samples are vital parts of Rock. I mean Gloria Jones had Tainted Love, then Soft Cell made it the massive hit it is, and decades later it was Rihanna who samples it in S.O.S. If anything samples and covers add to the legacy of an act. Enhancing their chances of getting represented in the Hall and being remembered by the general populace.

Posted by Chris F. on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 18:00pm
--------------------------------------------------
Covers, yes, Samples, no. (my take)

Everyone has done covers since the dawn of recorded music. The whole Pat Boone/Little Richard dust-up has to do w/covers, obviously. However, Boone also did his own stuff, and had success w/it. In all honesty, neither one really needed each other, as they both could've had success on their own.

With a sample, you're just riding on the back of someone else's popularity. Many's a weak song that gets propped up by the recognition of the known artist being sampled. You have to ask yourself, what's making the song work, the present artist or the past artist? Name-dropping in a song is one thing, if you hope to evoke a certain kind of emotion. Someone name-dropping Smoky & the Miracles, while doing a slower, but original song, may be able to harness the sense of similarity to a number like "Ooh, Baby Baby". If the song is original, then more power to them, as they created something on their own. Somebody just grabbing it blatantly brings up the question of, "who's driving the train"? Just send the royalty checks to Motown & have them divvy it up, cause there's a darn good chance it belongs to them, & not Joe Modern Artist. :)

Posted by Cheesecrop on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:28pm


Not so with all sampling. There's been some pretty amazing things done with them e.g. Paul's Boutique.

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:34pm


I'm not arguing what can be done w/sampling. Even I agree that Paul's Boutique is tremendous. I'm not a fan of Beyoncé, but I'll sucker out to "Crazy In Love" all the time, despite it being overplayed.

If you're talking non-hip-hop, the B.B. King parts on the old one hit song "Standing Outside A Broken Phone Booth With Money In My Hand", by Primitive Radio Gods, is one of the best examples ever of sampling in any kind of song.

That being said, you'll never know what really drove the train, per 'se. How much is the song tied to the sample? If you took the sample out, would it work As Well? (not saying it wouldn't work, just questioning whether it would work as well). It's a tricky question, & one no one may ever be able to answer.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:41pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WR911Y6rfnQ

****THE COMMODORES****

" This Is Your Life "

(1975)

Do you remember their smash "Sweet Love" ?

THAT song was the follow-up to THIS one

(# 13 R&B)

An R&B smash that, suprisingly didn't make the Hot 100 !!!

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:42pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KNAk0oYu20

Beyonce's "Crazy In Love" was ripped from The Chi-Lites hit, "Are You My Woman"

Sadly, she'll probably get into the Hall ahead of THEM.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:49pm


Well, there are song that are very heavily based around a sample, such as "Bound 2" from Kanye's newest album. The sample pretty much IS the song.

Still a great tune, though.

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:51pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3gvir7PtT0

Destiny's Child's song "Girl" was ripped from The Dramatics' "Oceans Of Thoughts And Dreams"

here's the original...

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:53pm


But (and I know that this is a stretch), try to imagine that The Beatles were Black. Do you think that ,despite their obvious talent, given the racial climate in the U.S. that they would have STILL gotten as big as they eventually did?

Be honest.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:09pm
--------------------------------------------------
You say be honest - well, I'll be honest.

Yes, I do believe so. And I'll tell you why.

1. You acknowledge that Motown was big in the 60's? Pretty basic stuff here.

If the Temptations, The Four Tops, The Supremes, etc., were as big as they were (and they were), then doesn't this mean that the Beatles, if they were Black, could still reach this level?

2. Songwriting-wise, the Holland-Dozier-Holland team was the equivalent of Lennon-McCartney - which simply means that in reverse, Lennon/McCartney were the equals of H-D-H. And H-D-H routinely hit #1 on the charts. In theory, this means a "Black Beatles" could also easily hit #1, & on multiple occasions.

I'll say this: had the Beatles been black, and taken the same route they took, it would roughly be the equivalent of the Temptations morphing into Jimi Hendrix. I think the real question is, how does the African-American community perceive Hendrix in 1967? That ought to tell you how they would've perceived a "black Beatles".

Posted by Cheesecrop on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:53pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIszesDaK9U

Here's the Destiny's Child song...

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 19:56pm


"If you're talking non-hip-hop, the B.B. King parts on the old one hit song "Standing Outside A Broken Phone Booth With Money In My Hand", by Primitive Radio Gods, is one of the best examples ever of sampling in any kind of song."

-Cheese

Totally agreed. And that gives me an idea for next Song Project.

Posted by DarinRG on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:05pm


"If the Temptations, The Four Tops, The Supremes, etc., were as big as they were (and they were), then doesn't this mean that the Beatles, if they were Black, could still reach this level?"

I hate to use the examples of those artists...because they weren't songwriters (Except for Lawrence Payton & Obie Benson of The 4 Tops)...so, let's use the only major Motown act of the Sixties that DID write their own (and almost everybody ELSE'S) stuff on the label back then: The Miracles. The songwriting team of Robinson, Rogers, Moore White and Tarplin wrote NUMEROUS classics ...everything from Marvin Gayes' "Ain't That Peculiar"and "I'll Be Doggone" to their own Tracks Of My Tears" and "Going To A Go-Go".

If The Miracles had been White ...do you think that they would have been bigger ?

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:07pm


Wish I'd beat you to it, but you called it first. :)

Posted by Cheesecrop on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:07pm


Ha, either way.

Posted by DarinRG on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:14pm


"I'll say this: had the Beatles been black, and taken the same route they took, it would roughly be the equivalent of the Temptations morphing into Jimi Hendrix. I think the real question is, how does the African-American community perceive Hendrix in 1967? That ought to tell you how they would've perceived a "black Beatles".

Posted by Cheesecrop

Well, Hendrix was never as big with Black record buyers as with White ones .Black record buyers had to actually be spoon-fed Rock in small doses before it finally caught on ...and the act that succeeded in eventually doing that was Sly & The Family Stone.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:19pm


The songwriting team of Robinson, Rogers, Moore White and Tarplin wrote NUMEROUS classics ...everything from Marvin Gayes' "Ain't That Peculiar" and "I'll Be Doggone" to their own Tracks Of My Tears" and "Going To A Go-Go".

If The Miracles had been White ...do you think that they would have been bigger ?

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:07pm
--------------------------------------------------
Yes... and No.

Yes, in that there was a natural advantage to being white in the 60's that cannot be denied. By that logic, the Miracles are going to have a chance to score a few more hits.

At the same time, they also would've been more vulnerable at blowing it, in terms of changing styles and trends. One nice thing about Motown was that everyone working as a unit could generate ideas in one area, and build upon them in another. If the Miracles were white, I am left to presume that they would've been working, a' la the Beatles, as an individual unit. This means they would've kept all the good stuff for themselves. Had the Miracles been out on their own in the R&B community, a' la James Brown or Otis Redding, you presume this also would've been the case.

At the same time, an individual unit can blow it big time. Countless white guitar acts ran a few songs up the flagpole, saw everyone salute it, and then went out on the road, only to find the flags had been lowered and everyone had moved onto another party.

Do I think the Miracles would have been bigger? Yes.

Do I also think they could've fallen flat on their faces, w/out Motown's conscious/unconscious self-checking system (from Berry Gordy on down) built-in? Yes.

But I do think they would've been bigger had they been white. :)

Posted by Cheesecrop on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:21pm


Well, Hendrix was never as big with Black record buyers as with White ones .Black record buyers had to actually be spoon-fed Rock in small doses before it finally caught on ...and the act that succeeded in eventually doing that was Sly & The Family Stone.

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:19pm
--------------------------------------------------
I'll admit it, the moment you asked "what if the Beatles were black" it got me thinking, "could we have a clue as to what they would've sounded like"?

This probably has nothing to do w/anything, but I think you can get a clue as to what they may have sounded like, had they been black.

The Beatles paid homage to Motown on "Revolver" w/the song "Got to Get You Into My Life". It would seem to me that the early songs, like "She Loves You" & "Can't Buy Me Love", would've sounded roughly like that, from say, 1964-halfway through 65.

I think by late 65, and 66, they would've sounded like the group Love, on their 67 album "Forever Changes". They would've sounded like a split between the "Alone Again Or" style, and perhaps the "Bummer in the Summer" style.

"Sgt. Pepper" may have sounded like Stevie Wonder's "Uptight". The White Album may have sounded like Hendrix's "Are You Experienced" (we're talking a somewhat radical shift). The Beatles talked about "Let It Be" as a return to their roots in skiffle & early rock. It would seem to me that a more R&B based version of the same thing would follow along, and switch things up in the direction of Jackie Wilson, Lloyd Price, etc. (maybe even Johnny Otis or Wilbert Harrison mixed in as well).

If I was going to create a fictional, "black Beatles", and I had to create a playlist to describe the sound, I'd have the following songs in order:

1. The Contours - "Do You Love Me?"
2. The Temptations - "Get Ready"
3. Love - "My Little Red Book"
4. Love - "Alone Again Or"
5. Love - "Bummer in the Summer"
6. Stevie Wonder - "Uptight (everything's alright)
7. The Chambers Brothers - "Time Has Come Today"
8. Love -"August"
9. Jimi Hendrix - "Stone Free"
10. Jimi Hendrix - "Voodoo Chile"
11. Jackie Wilson - "Lonely Teardrops"

this is a very rough idea, but...

Posted by Cheesecrop on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 20:41pm


Cheesecrop :

You left out the most obvious song"

"You've Really Got A Hold On Me"-by The Miracles

(because they actually DID record THAT one)

Posted by Bill G on Saturday, 09.7.13 @ 22:10pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGuJbbI_Cc4

*****The COMMODORES*****

One of their BADDEST JAMS...EVER !!!

"Fancy Dancer"

Here is proof positive why the ENTIRE GROUP should be inducted...and not just Lionel Richie solo

(Plus group intro and interview with Don C.)

Top 40 Pop, Top 10 R&B (1977)

Posted by Bill G on Sunday, 09.8.13 @ 10:57am


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=in6Aau0mVi0

******The COMMODORES******

Here's an alternative clip of "Fancy Dancer" from American Bandstand - same year - introduced by Dick C.

Posted by Bill G on Sunday, 09.8.13 @ 16:02pm


"How many bands can you name that had a major hit being sung by a member who was not an original member of the group and when the group was inducted, the singer who sung the major hit wasn't included as an inductee?"

The MIRACLES are not a "band", but, they had TWO major million-selling hits without SMOKEY...plus a THIRD Top Ten R&B hit , as well.

...And a Platinum Album.

Posted by Bill G on Sunday, 09.8.13 @ 17:16pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgSN6OIOxug

1) Do It Baby (1974)


...but Billy Griffin was snubbed from induction.

Posted by Bill G on Sunday, 09.8.13 @ 17:19pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQUZj57oljA

****The COMMODORES****

"EASY"

(# 4 Pop, # 1 R&B)

Posted by Bill G on Tuesday, 09.10.13 @ 12:57pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zW8PxmHkcYI

*****Induct The COMMODORES*****

Beny Ashburn (daughter of Commodores manager BENNY ASHBURN), wants to encourage everyone to push for THE COMMODORES to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame . She actually started this campaign in 2011, but the group still isn't in, so she's trying again....

Posted by Bill G on Friday, 10.11.13 @ 14:24pm


The Commodores need to be on the ballot this year I believe if inducted in 2015 they'll get back together and perform.Milan Williams is the only deceased member.While the others Lionel Richie,William King,Walter Orange,Thomas McClary,Ronald Lepread and JD Nichols who joined when Richie left are still alive and well please get em on the ballot for next induction they've been long overdue!!This would bring them together again I believe so Commodores HOF 2015 let's do it!!!

Posted by Robert Henry on Wednesday, 03.5.14 @ 22:15pm


The Commodores

01. Lionel Richie (1968-1977: vocals, saxophone, drums, piano)
02. Thomas McClary (1968-Present: lead guitar)
03. Milan Williams (1968-1989: keyboards, trombone, rhythm guitar)
04. William King (1968-Present: trumpet, rhythm guitar, synthesizer)
05. Ronald LaPread (1968-1985: bass guitar, trumpet)
06. Walter Orange (1968-Present: vocals, drums)
07. J.D. Nicholas (1985-Present: vocals; Heatwave)

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 04.22.14 @ 16:56pm


Most fans of popular music (presumably including members of Hall) seem to know the Commodores primarily because of the hit ballads that Lionel Richie wrote and sang. However, those hits only hinted at the depth and talent of the group. Even if we limit ourselves to the pop hits, few acts have fused country and soul like the Commodores did (e.g., "Easy," "Sail On," "Oh No") -- Ray Charles is one rare example. Also, the pop hits included funk standards such as "Brick House" and "Machine Gun." However, I can think of many additional Commodores songs that explored country (e.g., "Lucy") and funk (e.g., "Fancy Dancer") that either weren't released or didn't perform so well on the pop charts. And don't let me get started on non-hits (at least on the pop charts) that delved into gospel (e.g. "Jesus Is Love") and rock (e.g., "Heroes"). All in all, the Commodores were extremely versatile and repeatedly released music (rock and beyond) that stood the test of time; and they deserve to be in the Hall.

Posted by Stan on Tuesday, 12.16.14 @ 20:01pm


YES.....just YES .

Posted by Bill G. on Sunday, 05.17.15 @ 02:49am


Should have been inducted YEARS ago .
ALL of them...not just Richie .
Two of their biggest and best remembered hits, BRICK HOUSE, and NIGHT SHIFT, were led by Walter "Clyde" Orange...not Richie.
Put the WHOLE GROUP in.

Posted by Bill G. on Thursday, 08.13.15 @ 03:33am


Just WHAT IS IT about people singling out just ONE MEMBER of established, successful R&B groups, and giving that ONE MEMBER all of the credit and accolades, while virtually IGNORING the OTHER members...and essentially KICKING THEM TO THYE CURB ?
The Smokey / Miracles fiasco is a PRIME EXAMPLE of this.
It's bad enough that the RRHOF has cutting down and failing to induct, the number of deserving R&B groups over the last 11 years...
and even WORSE that they have almost COMPLETELY IGNORED late '60's/ early 70's R&B groups of the "Soul Train Era"...(Spinners, Dramatics, Whispers, Chi-Lites, Defonics,Stylistics, Main Ingredient,etc.
Now everybody want to talk about inducting LIONEL RICHIE as a "solo" act....essentially cutting out the REST of The COMMODORES from induction...
Despite the fact that they ALL truly DESERVE to get in !!!
"WHY"
Haven't these people LEARNED yet ?
Remember,deletion from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame basically means deletion from HISTORY.
...As the families and friends of snubbed original O'Jays member BILL ISLES and snubbed Midnighters Founder ALONZO TUCKER can attest to.
As well as ALL of the snubbed members of The MIRACLES !!
Induct ALL of the Commodores...NOT JUST LIONEL RICHIE !!!

Posted by Bill G. on Wednesday, 10.28.15 @ 13:15pm


Just WHAT IS IT about people singling out just ONE MEMBER of established, successful R&B groups, and giving that ONE MEMBER all of the credit and accolades, while virtually IGNORING the OTHER members...and essentially KICKING THEM TO THYE CURB ?
The Smokey / Miracles fiasco is a PRIME EXAMPLE of this.
It's bad enough that the RRHOF has cutting down and failing to induct, the number of deserving R&B groups over the last 11 years...
and even WORSE that they have almost COMPLETELY IGNORED late '60's/ early 70's R&B groups of the "Soul Train Era"...(Spinners, Dramatics, Whispers, Chi-Lites, Defonics,Stylistics, Main Ingredient,etc.
Now everybody want to talk about inducting LIONEL RICHIE as a "solo" act....essentially cutting out the REST of The COMMODORES from induction...
Despite the fact that they ALL truly DESERVE to get in !!!
"WHY"
Haven't these people LEARNED yet ?
Remember,deletion from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame basically means deletion from HISTORY.
...As the families and friends of snubbed original O'Jays member BILL ISLES and snubbed Midnighters Founder ALONZO TUCKER can attest to.
As well as ALL of the snubbed members of The MIRACLES !!
Induct ALL of the Commodores...NOT JUST LIONEL RICHIE !!!

Posted by Bill G. on Monday, 10.3.16 @ 13:14pm


"The Commodores: I think inducting The Commodores alone is not the best idea. Clearly, their best years were when Lionel Richie was in the group; so I think it should be Lionel Richie getting consideration for his entire life's work."

Posted by LAX 33

Man...are you kidding me ?

Two of The Commodores biggest and best-remembered hits, "Night Shift" and "Brick House" , weren't even led by Lionel Richie .They were led by Commodores member WALTER ORANGE.
And the ENTIRE GROUP wrote the song , including group member William King and his wife, Shirley !!
Another of the group's biggest hits ,the Top 10 "Lady (You Bring Me Up)", was written by Commodores member William King, not Richie.
Commodore TOMMY McCLARY wrote their hit "Slippery When Wet"...not Richie.
ALL of the group members were writers, and contributed to their many hits...(just like The Miracles)
But you think that Richie should go in ALONE ?
"NO" .
Richie's solo career was pure Pop. So much so, in fact that he was coined "The Black Barry Manilow".
Is Barry Manilow in the Hall ?
(see my point?)
If Lionel Richie gets a solo induction, it will be the Smokey/Miracles debacle ALL OVER AGAIN.
And for goodness sake, we've had enough of THAT.
Although the group had many Grammy nominations,
their only WIN was for "Night Shift"...
...which Richie had NOTHING to do with the writing of.
It was co-written by the group's OTHER lead singer,WALTER "CLYDE" ORANGE .

The group's very first hit, the million-selling "MACHINE GUN"...
Was written by group member MILAN WILLIAMS .

Original Commodores member Milan Williams is now dead.
Do you think that it would be a fitting tribute to him to leave him out of the Hall of Fame to induct Lionel Richie ALONE ?
Again, I say "NO".
The Commodores and their music pretty much OWNED the Seventies...with hit after hit after hit...
ALL of the group's members deserved to be recognized for this...ALL of them sang , ALL of them played, all of them wrote songs....
ALL of them contributed in a big way to the group's success....
ALL of them should be recognized:
WALTER "CLYDE" ORANGE, WILLIAM KING, MILAN WILLIAMS, RON LaPREAD,TOMMY McCLEARY, AND LIONEL RICHIE...
Induct ALL of THE COMMODORES !!!
You wanna put Richie in solo, fine.
But AFTER the GROUP goes in FIRST !!

Posted by Bill G. on Monday, 10.3.16 @ 14:01pm


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zN9kFrPHyw

****The COMMODORES****

The Commodores were BY FAR Motown's biggest act of the Seventies...and one of the biggest groups of any kind...period. Their hit records kept Motown alive at a time when many of their great Sixties acts had either left the label, of had retired. They had hit after hit after hit.
They are Grammy Award winners,American Music Award winners, and have been inductees into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame . But they have been IGNORED by The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for years !!! Don't ypu think it's time for Milan Williams, William King, Ron Le Pread, Lionel Richie, Walter "Clyde" Orange, and Tommy Mc Cleary to be inducted ??

Posted by bill g on Saturday, 10.15.16 @ 21:26pm


Dave Marsh is on record as describing the Commodores as music for men who pee sitting on a toilet.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 10.24.16 @ 19:09pm


The Commodores

01. Lionel Richie (1968-1977: vocals, saxophone, drums, piano)
02. Thomas McClary (1968-Present: lead guitar)
03. Milan Williams (1968-1989: keyboards, trombone, rhythm guitar)
04. William King (1968-Present: trumpet, rhythm guitar, synthesizer)
05. Ronald LaPread (1968-1985: bass guitar, trumpet)
06. Walter Orange (1968-Present: vocals, drums)
07. J.D. Nicholas (1985-Present: vocals; Heatwave)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 12.5.16 @ 05:31am


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