New Order

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 2006 (The 2007 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? No  what's this?


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 2007 (ranked #140) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Power, Corruption & Lies (1983)
Low-Life (1985)
Technique (1989)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Ceremony (1981)
Temptation (1982)
Blue Monday (1983)
Bizarre Love Triangle (1986)
True Faith (1987)
Regret (1993)

New Order @ Wikipedia

New Order Videos

Will New Order be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

76 comments so far (post your own)

Influential!

Posted by Ontario Emperor on Monday, 10.2.06 @ 00:44am


Merged dance with rock to form some sort of post-punk mix....they're more influential than most might realize. If Joy Division does not get a nomination, then at least New Order deserves one.

Posted by Ryan on Sunday, 10.29.06 @ 20:35pm


New Order was far more influential as Joy Division. You can still hear Ian Curtis in the sound of bands today (e.g., Interpol and She Wants Revenge).

Posted by George on Friday, 03.30.07 @ 21:00pm


That last comment made no sense as Ian wasn't in New Order, thus what you're saying is Joy Division was more influential.

New Order will make it eventually: one of the top 10 most influential artists of the 1980s.

Posted by Jeff on Sunday, 05.27.07 @ 18:56pm


New Order is one of the most influential bands of the '80s. It made innovative music and merged post-punk with dance music. There are more popular bands, but New Order was so much more creative than the rest. Its music range was vast therefore you could name New Order in the same breath as Depeche Mode, the Pet Shop Boys, The Cure and The Smiths. Try to compare the Depeche Mode with The Smiths and you'll realize that you can't because their music is of different genre, but with New Order, anything alternative can be compared to. This is where you really see New Order's multiple dimensions.

With New Order, you have history (Joy Division), drama (Factory Records), art (Peter Saville) and business (the Haçienda). Rarely do you find a band so interesting in music and in life.

Posted by Canuck21 on Wednesday, 07.25.07 @ 21:31pm


I'm not sure what got Get Ready to be the essential album, but I'd recommend 'Power, Corruption and Lies'

Posted by liam on Wednesday, 11.14.07 @ 12:22pm


Not too worried 'bout the 80s UK alernative groups. Alot of them get in these crappy Rolling Stone Mag best-of lists (albums, artists, songs etc.). The more popular groups getting in first is inevitable (ie The Police, Depeche Mode), but New Order, The Smiths and The Cure will all get in there...eventually.

Posted by Liam on Saturday, 02.16.08 @ 08:59am


Liam...thanks again for that GREAT list of artists you provided...it improved my library on Rhapsody by over 200 songs and gave it a whole different feel...great stuff!!!

Posted by Terry on Sunday, 02.17.08 @ 11:15am


Very welcome, Terry!

Posted by Liam on Monday, 02.18.08 @ 07:46am


Liam ...had another song really get my attention on my playlist...it was called "Lorelei" by Cocteau Twins. I really like that group!!

Posted by Terry on Monday, 02.18.08 @ 20:08pm


is it ok to just induct their drug machines and programmed synthesizers instead since they most of the work?

Posted by bquest on Friday, 10.3.08 @ 15:07pm


oops....I meant "drum machines".

Posted by bquest on Friday, 10.3.08 @ 15:09pm


Joy Division Should, They Started the Post-Punk Genre, basically, and are on of the most influential artists in the history of Alternative Music. If the Pixies get in, then Joy Division Definitely should. (not that the pixies weren't an amazing band) New Order, well, not quite as influential, but still quite good. I Wouldn't be too upset if New Order doesn't get in, but i'll burn the hall down if Joy Division doesn't get in in the next 5 years.

Posted by Calzone on Thursday, 10.16.08 @ 12:53pm


An emphatic YES.

Few people realize how important New Order really were. Misunderstandings and history have plagued them as just another synthpop group...but they weren't! New Order made authentic, unique dance music that competed with the best artists of that world during the eighties. It wasn't just danceable pop like their contemporaries. Their mix of electro, techno, and house pushed through cultural barriers, helping to establish various genres of dance as a force in Britain. More importantly, their music made waves in the rock community. Through a series of extraordinary records and singles, they broadened the views of many rock fans who'd never have given electronic dance music a chance otherwise. I'd argue they've done more to combat the idea of rockism than anyone.

Joy Division/New Order are the greatest British rock collective of the late twentieth century. They both deserve inclusion.

Posted by Jonas on Saturday, 11.29.08 @ 02:29am


I don't think New Order will be inducted, unless they treat it like a Parliament/Funkadelic situation with Joy Division. If they're inducted, the listing will read "Joy Division/New Order." They haven't gone out of their way to have a separate induction for Jefferson Starship, to differentiate that period from the Airplane days. I strongly suspect that the same fate will befall New Order, especially if Joy Division gets in on its own.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 11.29.08 @ 03:10am


The recently botched "remasters"/deluxe editions of their back catalogue won't do them any favours.

Posted by Liam on Saturday, 11.29.08 @ 12:02pm


New Order should have been inducted in their first year of eligibility, as for the drum machine comment, New Order had and has a live drummer.

Posted by martin on Thursday, 01.15.09 @ 11:33am


If Roxy Music, New Order and the Smiths do not get in, CLOSE DOWN THE HALL.

Posted by M Rourke on Sunday, 05.3.09 @ 20:58pm


I'm coming onto New Order slowly. I'd heard of them for years without knowing it ("Temptation" is on a Q Compilation from 1998, and I have a hardfloor remix of "Blue Monday" among my mp3 files, but beyond that we don't have any.) However, those songs are really unique; sounds like they bridged the gap between electronic, rock and dance music, and I know at some point indie clubs and dance floors crossed over to each other, so they must've been partially responsible for that. They're one of the most talked about indie bands, so the influence is probably there. Ah, here we go, from Allmusic: "Rising from the ashes of the legendary British post-punk unit Joy Division, the enigmatic New Order triumphed over tragedy to emerge as one of the most influential and acclaimed bands of the 1980s; embracing the electronic textures and disco rhythms of the underground club culture many years in advance of its contemporaries, the group's pioneering fusion of new wave aesthetics and dance music successfully bridged the gap between the two worlds, creating a distinctively thoughtful and oblique brand of synth pop appealing equally to the mind, body, and soul." They should get in. They are critically succesful (especially in the U.K.) and made a couple of appearances on Rolling Stone's Greatest Albums, so they will probably make it. But how long?

Posted by Sam on Friday, 02.5.10 @ 11:40am


You gotta be more than influential - you gotta influence more GOOD music.

The recent Factory Records compilation "Communication" makes a good case for them. New Order was to Factory as Booker T and the MG's was to Stax. Maybe not as directly, but the unique use of bass and the pairing of dance grooves with sublime melody span the whole Factory Records history.

And beyond. Would there be Chemical Brothers, Slowdive, or even Madonna without New Order? Eh, probably not.

Posted by Craig Riecke on Friday, 02.12.10 @ 05:47am


It's possible that Madonna was influenced by them, though I don't know for sure. Okay, discard my last comment. I have now listened to enough of New Order to get a feel for their sound, and I can say: Absolutely they should be in. What were they? It's tough to say. Their MySpace page says "New Wave/Alternative/Indie." Whatever they were, they were a great band who fused indie, dance music, disco and synth-pop into something that sounded like nobody else. And who can say that them funding the Hacienda doesn't qualify as Perpetuation/Impact? They and Joy Division had completely different sounds, so they should get seperate inductions, which the UK Hall failed to recognize (facepalm.)

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 04.1.10 @ 17:13pm


New Order really should be a lock, but chances are they won't be. There is no other band like them in the Hall, and the urgency to induct them doesn't seem to exist. www.notinhalloffame.com has them at #5 on their list to get in. What of a combined New ORder/Joy Division entry as a possibility?

Posted by The_Avenger on Friday, 04.16.10 @ 22:37pm


You're right, they should be in easily. Critics love them, so I feel confident that they'd be voted in if nominated, and Rolling Stone had them in their Greatest Albums list, which makes it strange that they've gone four years without even being considered. I guess I could deal with a joint induction, but I'd rather there wasn't one. They are both completely different bands, and are both no-brainer inductions. I actually think that a joint induction might be the only chance for Joy Division to get in; critics love them (especially in the UK), but at the moment I'd say that their limited output, combined with no urgency to induct them yet (not even considered since 2003) and a complete lack of any kind of Stateside success will lock them out. I could see New Order slipping in eventually due to some likely weak classes in the future (though a complete lack of disco or dance music of any kind in the Hall hurts their chances), but yes, a Joy Division/New Order joint induction might be the best case scenario. I'm just embarassed that the UK Hall of Fame felt that kind of joint induction was necessary; we should know better than that.

Posted by Sam on Monday, 04.19.10 @ 18:41pm


Chalk up another point for innovation. I'm watching my second Factory Records documentary today, and when "Blue Monday" was a hit (ironically they lost money every time it sold because the sleeve was so expensive), they became the first band that refused to mime on Top of the Pops. Not to mention the fact that their sales kept Factory afloat (which also gives bonus points to Joy Division, as it was them who got Factory going), and also they were co-owners of the Hacienda (and most of their royalties went into there), which for those who don't know was a highly influential club for pushing house music to a wider audience. It was to England what the acid house, disco and underground rap clubs were to New York in the late 70's/early 80's. I'm a bit concerned that they've gone four years without even being considered, but the classes will only get weaker from here most likely, so I could see them making it eventually. Joy Division also deserves it, but they did literally nothing in the US and have been ignored for seven years, so their window is probably shut. A joint induction might be the best way to go.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 05.7.10 @ 20:33pm


On Madonna and New Order...

I wouldn't say Madonna was influenced by New Order but the comparison serves an important purpose because it reveals WHY New Order was crucially different from other British bands and from most of popular music in general.

New Order and Madonna are true contemporaries. More than they do with either Depeche Mode or The Smiths, New Order shares an intimate place in pop music history with Madonna.

Madonna was a pop interloper with a background in the NYC underground of the late 70s/early 80s. She had absorbed the post-disco dance culture of the period and, under the right tutelage, created a series of records that established the validity of the new forms of dance music as a force in pop music, not just in terms of record sales and radio airplay, but allowing dance music to exist in the pop song format and shape it.

New Order's unique style came about the same way and at the same time. They had already flirted with the idea of dance music with the "Italian Disco" inspired Everything's Gone Green and Temptation. Green established a wholly new direction for the band, the sound that would fully distinguish them from Joy Division. Temptation defined their sensibility; Dance and Post-Punk guitar illuminated by that effervescent, transformational quality of the very best pop. The New York club scene of the early 80s gave the last ingredients. Thieves Like Us, The Perfect Kiss, Subculture, Bizarre Love Triangle, etc. These bear the same rhythmic qualities of many of Madonna's trailblazing singles...and they often shared producers!

Both Madonna and New Order redefined the possibilities of dance music in relation to pop/rock. We all know that Madonna became the model for most subsequent female pop stars. New Order was responsible for the infiltration of rock music by dance throughout the late 80s and 90s, up to this very day in fact, and also laid the groundwork for the modern electronic music culture in the UK by exposing the country to electro, house, and techno. It wasn't just the music they made; their club The Hacienda was a physical manifestation of their musical philosophy - rock, dance, pop, whatever (this club also made Manchester the music capitol of the UK.) From The Stone Roses & Happy Mondays to LCD Soundsystem & Hot Chip, New Order's ideas have become commonplace, fully integrated into rock language.

In reality, New Order is actually far more influential than Joy Division...but consider them one and the same. You cannot discuss one without the other. Collectively, Joy Division/New Order was the most important British group of the late seventies/eighties. As great as The Clash were and as revered as The Smiths would become, Joy Division/New Order did more to reshape British music culture. And they were simply damn good...

I personally don't care if they make it into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. The purpose and politics of the Rock Hall are backwards and useless.

Posted by Elastic Man on Sunday, 06.13.10 @ 05:42am


The U.K. Music Hall of Fame inducted them as Joy Division/New Order a few years ago! I doubt The Rock Hall will play that game.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.14.10 @ 11:14am


Joy Division

Bernard Albrecht
Ian Curtis
Peter Hook
Stephen Morris
Steve Brotherdale

New Order

Peter Hook
Stephen Morris
Phil Cunningham
Bernard Sumner
Gillian Gilbert

They should be inducted twice!

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.14.10 @ 11:19am


Agreed, Roy

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Wednesday, 07.14.10 @ 11:42am


Bernard Albrecht and Bernard Sumner are the same person.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.14.10 @ 16:25pm


I agree Roy. Seperate inductions. Of course, it's more likely the clowns that run the Hall will either just induct New Order or, most likely, ignore both, especially since both bands have gone without even being considered. Criminal.

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 07.14.10 @ 19:49pm


The U.K. Music Hall of Fame inducted them as Joy Division/New Order a few years ago! I doubt The Rock Hall will play that game.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.14.10 @ 11:14am

Well the Rock Hall did induct The Young Rascals/The Rascals as The (Young) Rascals. Yes, that is how they have them listed on their site.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 07.15.10 @ 09:12am


Joy Division/New Order inductees

Ian Curtis
Peter Hook
Stephen Morris
Steve Brotherdale
Phil Cunningham
Gillian Gilbert
Bernard Albrecht/Bernard Sumner

Posted by Roy on Friday, 07.16.10 @ 15:36pm


There is a possibility they will be inducted as Joy Division/New Order.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 07.19.10 @ 08:53am


A-HA! It's been done before, and this indeed will be the case for Joy Division and New Order. The group Parliament, who changed its name to Funkadelic, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as Parliament-Funkadelic and they had 16 members inducted, the most of any group in the Rock Hall. So Joy Division and New Order will be inducted as Joy Division-New Order or Joy Division/New Order, and they will have 7 inductees.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 07.19.10 @ 12:20pm


A-HA! It's been done before, and this indeed will be the case for Joy Division and New Order. The group Parliament, who changed its name to Funkadelic, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as Parliament-Funkadelic and they had 16 members inducted, the most of any group in the Rock Hall. So Joy Division and New Order will be inducted as Joy Division-New Order or Joy Division/New Order, and they will have 7 inductees. They were inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame as Joy Division/New Order a few years ago. When they get nominated/inducted into the Rock Hall, their pages and the comments on Future Rock Rock Legends will have to be merged into one page.

The Inductees:

Joy Division/New Order

Ian Curtis
Peter Hook
Stephen Morris
Steve Brotherdale
Phil Cunningham
Gillian Gilbert
Bernard Albrecht/Bernard Sumner

Posted by Roy on Monday, 07.19.10 @ 13:12pm


Parliament - 9 Studio Albums
Funkadelic - 14 Studio Albums

Nominated and Inducted as Parliament-Funkadelic

Joy Division - 2 Studio Albums
New Order - 9 Studio Albums

They should be nominated and inducted as Joy Division-New Order

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 07.25.10 @ 12:04pm


Joy Division members only

Ian Curtis
Steve Brotherdale

Joy Division/New Order members

Peter Hook
Stephen Morris
Bernard Albrecht/Bernard Sumner

New Order members only

Phil Cunningham
Gillian Gilbert

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 07.25.10 @ 12:43pm



I've thought of the reasons why they've been snubbed so far. One, the lack of significant impact in the US (no, I'm not referring to artistic impact, I'm talking about commercial impact.) Not that many hits, one platinum album, two gold albums, and they don't get much airplay these days. Two, the ceremony itself. Even if they did show up (it would be questionable whether even one of them would show due to some of their influences being snubbed, much less whether any of them would feel it worth their time to come from England to New York or Cleveland just for that), how many people would tune in to watch them give their speeches? Which goes back to problem #1. Three, the performance. Since they're split, Gillian's retired, and Peter's not on speaking terms with Steven and Bernard, someone would have to stand in for them in the performance, and I'm sure Jann and co. wouldn't know who would be best for the job. Four, the two-band thing. They probably don't know whether to do a joint Joy Division/New Order induction or induct them seperately. It doesn't excuse the fact that JD and NO have both been snubbed, and it's absurd that neither have of them have been considered, that's just the situation as I see it.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 08.6.10 @ 21:04pm


Easy inductee, but with just 2 Joy Division two studio albums, the fact that key members like Bernard Sumner, Stephen Morris, and Peter Hook in both bands until New Order broke up last year, a "New Order/Joy Division" entry is most likely. Moreover, with New Order's 1987 album "Substance" including two songs from Ian Curtis and live performances by New Order, continuing up to Buenos Aires a few years back, a "joint" entry is even more likely.
The fact that bassist Peter Hook and Joy Division Guitarist and New Order lead singer Bernard Sumner having a recent falling out should have no role in the band's induction, ask The Talking Heads band members.
Lastly, whether joint or separate inductors should be made for both groups, no band(s) have influenced more styles of music or had more relevance in music from Joy Division's (or Warsaw's -if you want to induct them under 3 names) "An Ideal for Living" to New Order's "Waiting for the Siren's Call."
"Post-Punk" was a term created just for their music. Burn this alleged Hall of Fame down with Genesis and Black Sabbath inducted, and no Joy Division AND New Order voted in now!

Posted by Adam Piergallini on Tuesday, 08.10.10 @ 02:07am


I was with you all the way at first Adam, even though you forgot the feud is actually Hooky vs. Bernard and Steven (monetary issues), and the idea that JD and NO are the single most influential musical collective is dubious at best, but in spite of those issues I was able to keep going because you are a fellow fan and I agreed with what your general point. But then you had to argue against Sabbath and Genesis being inducted (the latter was a highly influential art-rock and prog outfit fronted by Peter Gabriel long before Phil Collins even thought about being a singer), and you blew most of your credibility right there. Sorry. You could've picked Percy Sledge... or Paul McCartney solo... or pointed out that Eric Clapton solo made some really crappy songs... but no, instead you had to pick on two bands who should've been inducted long before they got their due (facepalm.)

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 08.11.10 @ 20:20pm


They were inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame as Joy Division/New Order in 2005. Induction speech by actor John Simm. Joy Division/New Order performed Regret and Love Will Tear Us Apart.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 08.19.10 @ 13:28pm


Let's not forget that same Hall inducted Bon Jovi and Robbie Williams. Plus, they were together at that point, and it wasn't that far to travel to. The fact that they're disbanded and Peter Hook's estranged from them eliminates any chance of a band performance (and in New Order's case Gillian's retired), and if you think they're going to go across the Atlantic just for the ceremony then clearly, for you, "Everything's Gone Green" (or are you losing it because your brain's going "Round and Round"?) It takes some "True Faith" to think they have a legitimate shot; perhaps some people need to be "Touched By the Hand of God" (bad puns, I know.)

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 08.22.10 @ 15:30pm


(bad puns, I know.)

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 08.22.10 @ 15:30pm


Well I still enjoyed reading them!!

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Sunday, 08.22.10 @ 15:48pm


It's been done before, and this indeed will be the case for Joy Division and New Order. The group Parliament, who changed its name to Funkadelic, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as Parliament-Funkadelic and they had 16 members inducted, the most of any group in the Rock Hall. So Joy Division and New Order will be inducted as Joy Division-New Order or Joy Division/New Order, and they will have 7 inductees.

They were inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame as Joy Division/New Order in 2005. Induction speech by actor John Simm. Joy Division/New Order performed Regret and Love Will Tear Us Apart.

Parliament - 9 Studio Albums
Funkadelic - 14 Studio Albums

Nominated and Inducted as Parliament-Funkadelic

Joy Division - 2 Studio Albums
New Order - 9 Studio Albums

They should be nominated and inducted as Joy Division-New Order

Joy Division members only

Ian Curtis
Steve Brotherdale

Joy Division/New Order members

Peter Hook
Stephen Morris
Bernard Albrecht/Bernard Sumner

New Order members only

Phil Cunningham
Gillian Gilbert

Posted by Roy on Friday, 09.17.10 @ 04:30am


New Order had 8 studio albums. If it was the only chance Joy Division had of being represented I'd be fine with a joint induction, but anyone who really knows both bands will know that it would be most fair to treat them seperately.

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 09.19.10 @ 10:04am


Okay Sam,

I really was in rare form and probably should not have lowered the hammer on Genesis. I stand by my Sabbath Comments but I withdraw my comment on Genesis as I am a big Gabriel fan and have defended the band many times in prior discussions. What I was getting at is whether Sabbath and Genesis belong in the Hall or not, the fact that NO and JD have not even been seriously considered for the US Hall entry is just crazy.
Is it really that dubious of the influence of JD and NO in the past 20 years? How many bands in the pop-synth revival of today from the US and UK have cited NO as an influence (Killers, Franz, Oasis, Thursday, etc.), how many re-mixes of NO songs exist, what about the recent resurgence of interest in Ian Curtis and JD with two movies, numerous covers, and legions of teenage fans now re-discovering JD and their music?
Must confess, saw the last NO show in Buenos Aires at Club Ciudad (a park in the middle of the city). Oh, great performance by "The Bravery" who said they had to wrap up their performance to catch their "largest influence, New Order." The band played until the authorities told them they had to stop. They literally had to grab Hooky off the stage he was having so much fun playing. You seem to know more about this dispute than I do, but it saddens me to see a band having so much fun playing for decades, torn apart by something other than just music. Guess it happens more than i like to think.
I am with you that individual inductions are warranted, but if a miracle does occur and the musicians are inducted to the US Hall, it will be as NO/JD.

Posted by Adam Piergallini on Saturday, 10.16.10 @ 02:51am


Okay Sam,

I really was in rare form and probably should not have lowered the hammer on Genesis. I stand by my Sabbath Comments but I withdraw my comment on Genesis as I am a big Gabriel fan and have defended the band many times in prior discussions. What I was getting at is whether Sabbath and Genesis belong in the Hall or not, the fact that NO and JD have not even been seriously considered for the US Hall entry is just crazy.
Is it really that dubious of the influence of JD and NO in the past 20 years? How many bands in the pop-synth revival of today from the US and UK have cited NO as an influence (Killers, Franz, Oasis, Thursday, etc.), how many re-mixes of NO songs exist, what about the recent resurgence of interest in Ian Curtis and JD with two movies, numerous covers, and legions of teenage fans now re-discovering JD and their music?
Must confess, saw the last NO show in Buenos Aires at Club Ciudad (a park in the middle of the city). Oh, great performance by "The Bravery" who said they had to wrap up their performance to catch their "largest influence, New Order." The band played until the authorities told them they had to stop. They literally had to grab Hooky off the stage he was having so much fun playing. You seem to know more about this dispute than I do, but it saddens me to see a band having so much fun playing for decades, torn apart by something other than just music. Guess it happens more than i like to think.
I am with you that individual inductions are warranted, but if a miracle does occur and the musicians are inducted to the US Hall, it will be as NO/JD.

Posted by Adam Piergallini on Saturday, 10.16.10 @ 02:54am


Truth well spoken. Since you mentioned The Killers, they display a clear debt to NO. Actually, the influence of both Joy Division and New Order is apparently clearly displayed in the whole new wave/post-punk revival, which has been going on for 10 years or so, and The Killers are the most popular band to come out of that. Would the dance-rock experiements by their fellow Mancunians Happy Mondays and The Stone Roses have reached any kind of audience without New Order? Actually, would they have thought to do it without them? Probably not. I haven't even discussed the cultural and musical significance of the Hacienda yet. Apparently the band Bloc Party has cited NO and JD as key influences; I believe I read an interview with them where they said that, with their bassist saying Hooky was the reason he started playing. Unfortunately, I just looked for it and can't find it, but I'll make up for it with a proper analysis.

As far as the feud is concerned: I know as much as you do. Evidently Hooky was just tired of it, because he left without telling anyone, and later admitted to doing the final tour for the money. He then shouted down via the Internet the idea of them carrying on without him, so they wisely split; easier to do that than replace him. Shame, really; 30 years of friendship and 4 deaths in the family can't prevent a feud. Stephen's speaking to him apparently, but Bernard has no desire to, as he's absolutely furious with him. Right now, Bernard's started a new band with Phil Cunningham; Stephen's contributed to that a bit, and I don't know what else he's doing; and Hooky is DJ'ing and playing in a super-group with Mani and some guy named Gary Briggs (Andy Rourke was part of it but then quit.) Some people have suggested that New Order should've quit when Gillian did (she retired at the end of the 90's to look after her and Stephen's daughters.) What I've heard from the two albums without her I've enjoyed, but the last one was a critical and commercial failure, which probably hurt their induction chances. I do which Hooky would do a new moving forward kind of project instead of focusing on nostalgia (Joy Division oven gloves and shoes? Shameful cashing in on Ian's memory) but at this point he's earned the right to do what he wants. He is right, though; Morrissey is a twat.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 10.21.10 @ 10:35am


On further review, it turns out that some people not connected to any surviving members of the Joy Division or New Order family are responsible for the Unknown Pleasures shoes, Joy Division oven gloves or T-shirts, rare Martin Hannett tapes or anything else designed to make a quick bit of money off of the memory of anything Ian Curtis related, and apparently Hook himself has complained about it. My apologies for jumping to conclusions.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 10.21.10 @ 12:41pm


Live interview with Joy Division/New Order co-founder Peter Hook

Time
Tuesday, November 30 · 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Location Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard
Cleveland, OH
Created By
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum
More Info **This event is free with a reservation. Please email edu@rockhall.org or call (216) 515-8426 to RSVP. This event will also be live streamed on rockhall.com.**

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is pleased to welcome Peter Hook, co-founder of post-punk bands Joy Division and New Order, for a special Legends Series interview on Tuesday, November 30 at 7 p.m. in the Rock Hall’s Foster Theater.

Hook will be interviewed by the Rock Hall’s Director of Education Jason Hanley. Questions will be taken from the audience at the end of the interview. Hook will also be performing a selection of songs from Joy Division’s seminal album, Unknown Pleasures. This event is free with a reservation. Please email eduatrockhalldotorg or call (216) 515-8426 to RSVP. This event will be live streamed on rockhalldotcom.

Born in 1956 in Salford, England, legendary bass guitarist Peter Hook remains energetically devoted to music, rock and roll and the experiences that his three decade career has given him with bands like Joy Division and New Order, which he co-founded, as well as Revenge, Monaco and Freebass. He is also the director of the infamous Fac 51 The Hacienda and manager of the Manchester indie venue the Factory.

A well respected rock and roll icon, Hook is known for his droning bass lines which dominated the sounds of Joy Division and New Order. He overcame the trend of badly tuned guitars during the punk rock era and made the throbbing beat of the bass stress the importance of rhythm. Hook has become synonymous with the Manchester music scene and what it represents culturally. As a DJ, he is one of the most sought after in the world, both as himself and also with the revived Haçienda, and he continues to record and produce new music.

Most recently Hook has opened a new chapter on his life, as a critically acclaimed author with his honest to account of the turbulent times of the Haçienda years in the critically acclaimed The Haçienda – How Not To Run A Club. He is also presently writing his second book on Joy Division and plans a book to follow on New Order.

Having decided to commemorate the 30 year anniversary of Joy Division lead vocalist Ian Curtis’ passing by performing Unknown Pleasures in two charity supporting concerts at The Factory in Manchester with his band The Light, the band has been invited from around the world for these special concerts and over the Summer of 2010.

Over September and October 2010 Hooky and the Light undertook sold out tours of Australia, New Zealand and Spain before performing a three date tour of Italy in late November prior to this coast to coast tour of The States. Next year, the group will tour Europe in February 2011 and begin writing and recording new material.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum has a spotlight exhibit on Joy Division and New Order in the Ahmet M. Ertegun Main Exhibit Hall. Featured in the exhibit is Peter Hook’s bass guitar, Bernard Sumner’s acoustic guitar, concert posters, ticket stubs, original handwritten lyrics to songs like “Love Will Tear Us Apart” and “Blue Monday” and more.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum has FREE educational offerings year round. Additional adult education programs include From Songwriters to Soundmen: The People Behind the Hits, which gives audiences an inside look at aspects of the music business that are often concealed from view, and Rock and Roll Night School, which gives interested adults the opportunity to expand their rock and roll-related knowledge.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 03:46am


http://rockhall.com/event/legends-series-featuring-joy-d/

It's starting to look like they will indeed be inducted into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame as Joy Division/New Order.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 10:05am


Steve Howe did an event at the Hall the past May, and that didn't get Yes a nomination, did it?

I'd be overjoyed if it happened, but it's not going to.

Posted by Sam on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 10:56am


Legends Series Featuring Joy Division/New Order Co-Founder Peter Hook

Tuesday, November 30: 7 p.m.
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is pleased to welcome Peter Hook, co-founder of post-punk bands Joy Division and New Order, for a special Legends Series interview on Tuesday, November 30 at 7 p.m. in the Rock Hall’s Foster Theater.

Hook will be interviewed by the Rock Hall’s Director of Education Jason Hanley. Questions will be taken from the audience at the end of the interview. Hook will also be performing a selection of songs from Joy Division’s seminal album, Unknown Pleasures.

THIS EVENT IS AT CAPACITY. Please email edu@rockhall.org or call (216) 515-8426 to RSVP for the waiting list should any seats become available.

This event will be live streamed on rockhall.com.

Born in 1956 in Salford, England, legendary bass guitarist Peter Hook remains energetically devoted to music, rock and roll and the experiences that his three decade career has given him with bands like Joy Division and New Order, which he co-founded, as well as Revenge, Monaco and Freebass. He is also the director of the infamous Fac 51 The Hacienda and manager of the Manchester indie venue the Factory.

A well respected rock and roll icon, Hook is known for his droning bass lines which dominated the sounds of Joy Division and New Order. He overcame the trend of badly tuned guitars during the punk rock era and made the throbbing beat of the bass stress the importance of rhythm. Hook has become synonymous with the Manchester music scene and what it represents culturally. As a DJ, he is one of the most sought after in the world, both as himself and also with the revived Haçienda, and he continues to record and produce new music.

Most recently Hook has opened a new chapter on his life, as a critically acclaimed author with his honest to account of the turbulent times of the Haçienda years in the critically acclaimed The Haçienda – How Not To Run A Club. He is also presently writing his second book on Joy Division and plans a book to follow on New Order.

Having decided to commemorate the 30 year anniversary of Joy Division lead vocalist Ian Curtis’ passing by performing Unknown Pleasures in two charity supporting concerts at The Factory in Manchester with his band The Light, the band has been invited from around the world for these special concerts and over the Summer of 2010.

Over September and October 2010 Hooky and the Light undertook sold out tours of Australia, New Zealand and Spain before performing a three date tour of Italy in late November prior to this coast to coast tour of The States. Next year, the group will tour Europe in February 2011 and begin writing and recording new material.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum has a spotlight exhibit on Joy Division and New Order in the Ahmet M. Ertegun Main Exhibit Hall. Featured in the exhibit is Peter Hook’s bass guitar, Bernard Sumner’s acoustic guitar, concert posters, ticket stubs, original handwritten lyrics to songs like “Love Will Tear Us Apart” and “Blue Monday” and more.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 21:25pm


Seeing how the Rock Hall referred to them Joy Division/New Order when announcing that Peter Hook would be visiting the museum, it seems likely that that is how they will be inducted: Joy Division/New Order. That's how they were inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 12.3.10 @ 08:32am


If I was able to pick the nominations next year I'd nominate Joy Division and see what happens. Here's how it went with the UK Music Hall of Fame: The music industry people and journalists decided things inducted in 2004 (the first year): Elvis to represent the 50's, The Beatles to represent the 60's, Bob Marley to represent the 70's, Madonna to represent the 80's and U2 to represent the 90's. They then nominated ten 50's acts, ten 60's acts, ten 70's acts, ten 80's acts and ten 90's acts and asked the public to vote for one per decade. Joy Division was one of the 80's acts nominated, but lost to Michael Jackson. The other eight 80's nominees: George Michael, Guns N' Roses, Beasties Boys, Bruce Springsteen, The Smiths, R.E.M., Public Enemy and Prince. The following year, the 60 music industry inducted Joy Division and New Order as a joint entity, after their attempt to induct Joy Division on their own failed.

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 12.8.10 @ 05:34am


I should add that New Order, in my opinion, won't get in until the Hall gets their heads out their asses and inducts Depeche Mode and The Cure, both more popular bands. That will happen eventually, I know it, but it looks like it's going to take awhile. Once they're in, Coldplay's in, Radiohead's in, Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden and Oasis are all in, then the Hall will look stupid. Oh, and induct Kraftwerk next year please, so that NO, DM and Nine Inch Nails and the like can go in with a clear conscience.

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 12.8.10 @ 05:41am


I meant the Hall will look stupid for not inducting New Order and Joy Division, and I think all the bands I listed will get in first at the rate we're going. Possibly The Smiths as well.

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 01.5.11 @ 16:00pm


http://rockhall.com/photo-gallery/legends-series-featuring/2563/#first_content

The exhibit at the Rock Hall says Joy Division / New Order.

This is a sign! This is how they will indeed be nominated and inducted.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.16.11 @ 07:08am


Bernard's Rock Hall Trophy will read:

Joy Division/New Order
Bernard Albrecht/Sumner

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.16.11 @ 07:26am


15 out of the 16 inductees were members of both Parliament and Funkadelic. Glenn Lamont Goins was only a member of Parliament. I wonder if his trophy read Parliament-Funkadelic or just Parliament.

And if Joy Division and New Order are indeed nominated and inducted as Joy Division/New Order will the trophies of the inductees who were members of Joy Division only, read Joy Division only? And will the trophies of the inductees who were members of New Order only, read New Order only?

Maybe the Rock Hall will go so far as nominating both Joy Division and New Order separately on the same ballot, the same year, and inducting them the same year, with Peter Hook, Stephen Morris, and Bernard Albrecht/Sumner joining the group of artists who have been inducted more than once into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Plus, joining Stephen Stills as the only artists inducted into the Rock Hall twice in the same year. I wonder if the voters would vote for both Joy Division and New Order if they are on the same ballot.

Joy Division members only

Ian Curtis
Steve Brotherdale

Joy Division/New Order members

Peter Hook
Stephen Morris
Bernard Albrecht/Bernard Sumner

New Order members only

Phil Cunningham
Gillian Gilbert

Posted by Roy on Friday, 01.21.11 @ 04:06am


Favorite NO song Roy?

Posted by Sam on Friday, 01.21.11 @ 12:33pm


Regret

Posted by Roy on Friday, 01.21.11 @ 20:42pm


JOINT INDUCTIONS: What Was/What Should Have Been/And What Will Be

01. 1996 - Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship
02. 1997 - The (Young) Rascals
03. 1997 - Parliament/Funkadelic
04. 2012 - The Small Faces/The Faces
05. 20?? - Joy Division/New Order
06. 20?? - Wham!/George Michael

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 01.28.12 @ 06:40am


A-HA! It's a sign!

Ian McLagan = The Small Faces + The Faces

Ian Curtis = Joy Division - New Order

Steve Marriott = The Small Faces - The Faces

Steve Brotherdale = Joy Division - New Order

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.29.12 @ 08:19am


THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Joy Division/New Order

01. Ian Curtis (Joy Division)
02. Peter Hook (Joy Division/New Order)
03. Stephen Morris (Joy Division/New Order)
04. Bernard Albrecht/Sumner (Joy Division/New Order)
05. Gillian Gilbert (New Order)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 02.13.12 @ 22:03pm


http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/new-order-life-after-death-20120518

New Order: Life After Death
Rolling Stone's 1983 feature on the band's rebirth after the suicide of Joy Division frontman Ian Curtis

By Debby Miller
May 18, 2012 12:05 PM ET
This story is from the September 15th, 1983 issue of Rolling Stone.

May 19th, 1980, was no ordinary Monday for the members of Joy Division. Bags were packed and goodbyes had been said. They were ready to leave for America, on their first rock & roll tour abroad. They had finished a new single, its title etched across a gravestone on the sleeve: Love Will Tear us Apart.

But Joy Division – such a weird name for a group known for gloomy music and the forlorn voice of its singer – never left England that blue Monday. There was something about the promise of the trip that made lead singer Ian Curtis put a noose around his neck and hang himself the evening before. More goodbyes.

"On Sunday morning, I was turning my trousers up. Monday, I was screaming," remembers the band's drummer, Stephen Morris.

But Joy Division would soon become well known in America anyway – both for "Love Will Tear Us Apart," one of the most influential songs of the past years, and for Curtis' suicide, which put a lasting chill into the band's legacy.

With Curtis' death, Joy Division, which is what the prostitutes' area of Nazi concentration camps was called, officially came to an end. "I must admit Ian was the charismatic individual in the band," says Martin Hannett, the producer of the band's records. Because Curtis had been the focus of the first group, the three remaining members reorganized as New Order.

"There's life and there's death. We were still alive, so we thought we'd carry on doing it," says Morris. With a keyboardist added and guitarist Bernard Sumner taking over as lead singer, New Order is still very much an extension of Joy Division: like uncluttered landscapes in dark colors, New Order's music remains more mood than melody.

In Britain, partly by unwittingly riding the coattails of the synth-based pop bands, New Order has become one of the first-rank rock groups – the thinking man's Human League. In America, clubs are playing the band's twelve-inch dance single "Blue Monday" (which sold over a quarter of a million copies in England) and are beginning to break what may be the group's biggest stateside hit, "Confusion." That last and much ballyhooed dance track is the result of a collaboration with producer Arthur Baker, master of the New York street sound and the man responsible for the recent hits "PlanetRock," "Candy Girl" and "I.O.U."

Record buyers are also sniffing at a well-reviewed new album of uncharacteristically frisky music, Power, Corruption & Lies, New Order's second and best L.P. To promote it, the band just made its second tour of America – only a small block of dates, by necessity.

"We don't have a major record company that gives us cocaine at the end of the tour," explains a downright cheery Stephen Morris, relaxing on a rainy night in June after a sold-out show at First Avenue, a huge Minneapolis club. The band's keyboard player, Gillian Gilbert, who lives with Morris in Manchester, was back in the room after a bit of "puddling" through the soaked parking lot at the Ambassador Motel.

The Minneapolis show had been, well, a bit somber. When few in the audience seemed moved by the new song "Thieves Like Us," Bernard Sumner – he's using that surname after having tired of Dickens (his family name) and Albrecht (his former stage name) – fairly spat out, "If you didn't like that, you must be Americans." Many seemed disappointed that the band wasn't a sad-faced Duran Duran, a party animal; more seemed upset that they didn't play the Joy Division songs.

"We did 'Love Will Tear Us Apart' once, on the anniversary of Ian's death," says the tall, thin Morris, whose drumming – a human sound that plays against the keyboard electronics – is really the band's signature. "But Joy Division doesn't exist anymore, and it would be foolish to kid people into believing it does."

Although a dark cloud still seems to hover over their music, their newest material is pointedly dance-oriented. "I'm not saying we play disco music," says Morris, "but there are some interesting time signatures knocking about in our songs." New Order wanted – and got – a true dance mix for "Confusion," the single they made with Arthur Baker, whose "Planet Rock" they'd admired.

"The fact that they make depressing-sounding records isn't what attracted me to them," says Baker. "But once we got in the studio, I used that the way I would use it in one of my own songs. I really do not write happy music myself. My songs are based in reality, on human situations. And that's what I liked about their stuff."

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.20.12 @ 21:55pm


http://rockhall.com/photo-gallery/legends-series-featuring/2563/

Here it is: Joy Division / New Order exhibit at the Rock Hall Museum in Cleveland.

THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Joy Division/New Order

01. Ian Curtis (Joy Division)
02. Peter Hook (Joy Division/New Order)
03. Stephen Morris (Joy Division/New Order)
04. Bernard Albrecht/Sumner (Joy Division/New Order)
05. Gillian Gilbert (New Order)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 08.19.12 @ 21:22pm


hahaha what a joke that this band isn't in the hall. They're on a different level even compared to some of the groups that are already in...just goes to show that the hall is meaningless, which makes this post less than worthless. But there you go.

Posted by Wil on Wednesday, 11.28.12 @ 19:22pm


Not before JOY DIVISION!!!!

Posted by BulmaPunkRocker on Sunday, 07.6.14 @ 22:56pm


Favorite band of all time. Pretty much single-handedly taught me how to write music. Fantastic albums with incredible consistency in their '80s albums. Perfect Kiss (extended version) is my favorite song of all time. I believe both will enter the HOF, but like others have said this "HOF" is absolutely worthless and holds no merit to me. In other words, I could care less. I believe both bands should be inducted separately bc of their different genres and the different paths both bands created. Both Joy Division and New Order were incredibly influential within rock. I really can't say enough about this band.

Posted by American on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 23:26pm


They should be inducted as Joy Division/New Order

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 04.10.16 @ 09:37am


New Radicals

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 08.30.16 @ 21:20pm


Given the personnel overlap they should induct New Order and Joy Division as one group of performers and recognize the collective work as worthy.

Posted by William on Friday, 12.30.16 @ 13:51pm


Should be nominated and inducted as Joy Division/New Order.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 01.10.17 @ 04:47am


A no-brainer - they need to be in the Hall!

Posted by Tim on Saturday, 01.21.17 @ 11:54am


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