John Coltrane

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1981 (The 1982 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? No  what's this?


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 2003 (ranked #8 in the Influences - Rock Era category) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Blue Train (1957)
Giant Steps (1960)
My Favorite Things (1961)
A Love Supreme (1965)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
My Favorite Things (1960)
Giant Steps (1960)
A Love Supreme, Part 1: Acknowledgement (1965)

John Coltrane @ Wikipedia

John Coltrane Videos

Will John Coltrane be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

38 comments so far (post your own)

With Miles' induction, Coltrane should be arriving shortly.

Posted by Casper on Wednesday, 01.17.07 @ 16:13pm


Come On, Coltrane revolutionized Jazz, and he played with every one, Davis, Hancock, Cannonball, come on he needs to be in this with the rest of them. With out them who would be there to get the horn players of the future playin

Posted by B Trav on Wednesday, 04.4.07 @ 20:21pm


He's not Rock 'n' Roll, but definitely deserves it under the 'roots and influences' category.

Posted by Torc on Thursday, 10.4.07 @ 13:22pm


To Jake and ALL

I love this one "Kulu Sé Mama"... But that is just me..all are good
"ALL YOU NEED IS EARS"

Posted by mrxyz on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 21:19pm


It would be a shame if they don't induct him.

Posted by Gabatxo on Friday, 07.3.09 @ 02:23am


it would be a shame if they don't induct him.

Posted by Gabatxo on Friday, 07.3.09 @ 02:23am

It would be a shame if they did...an insult to his playing.. he is way to good and rock he was never.. If anyone in rock was influenced by him you would never know it..

Posted by L-7 on Tuesday, 01.19.10 @ 22:49pm


Does Jazz belong to Rock & Roll? Well, I guess if you're a purist, then certainly not, but Rock & Roll was never pure to begin with. It's a bastard child bred from many different influences that is ever-changing and -evolving. Along with Blues, Country, Gospel and Folk, Jazz is one of the basic influences on R&R, one of the primary colours, maybe to a lesser extent and less obviously than the others but definitely a part of it. The induction of Miles Davis in the hall as well as Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday and a couple of others in the early influences category proves the point. As for Coltrane himself - I think that "Eight Miles High" and "Light My Fire" should be enough evidence for his influence.

Posted by denyo on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 20:48pm


denyo
That is the most ridiculous thing I have heard in quite a while.. John Coltrane an rock are as about as close connected as oil and water...Other than maybe Zappa. I would see little connection.Billie did blues an Miles did some rock.. Why don't we induct Mozart? That would make far more sense.

Posted by L-7 on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 21:29pm


Lots of rock guitarists have experimented trying to implement John Coltrane's sax playing technique on guitar...I'd say that's a "little connection".

Things are not always as they seem...maybe you should do your homework before commenting...

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 21:49pm


L-7...have you ever listened to Coltrane? Listen to him, and then listen to a guitarist like John McLaughlin (that is, if you've ever heard of him...). After that, come back and say there's "no connection" with a straight face...

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 21:57pm


I would agree on the word "Little" There is more Mozart than Coltrane in rock .. It would be a ten steps down and dumbed into a swamp for either one to be placed in the same box as rock..

Posted by L-7 on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 21:59pm


I saw him Coltrane perform live to many times to count..To think that the two share the same bed is a nightmare.. Good night an dream on.

Posted by L-7 on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 22:02pm


You obviously didn't listen when you saw him, then. Gee, how many rock guitarists have played solos in short, very fast bursts? McLaughlin...highly influenced by Coltrane...does a version of "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat". Sometime thereafter, Jeff Beck does his own version of it.

No connection there, right???? As mrxyz would say...

"All ya need are EARS"

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 22:09pm


Let's not forget that "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat" was composed and originally recorded by Charles Mingus...a very celebrated JAZZ composer and bassist. It's been covered by the aformentioned, plus Joni Mitchell (who gave the song lyrics) and Andy Summers...who've also been referred to as "rock musicians" from time to time...

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 22:28pm


Charles Mingu a very talent musician ..but I was talking about Coltrane.. As much as MRXYZ and I agreeing on oh ,my god "Surf Music", or any music, I would say that it could be on the proportion of a Shakespearian tragedy, if it were completely true. The only thing worse, of almost biblical proportion, is that "you" are saying or somehow implying that,Mingu an Coltrane are in someway one in the same... !After saying all of the above. I do find many of your statements even more ridiculous than deyno..

Posted by L-7 on Thursday, 03.25.10 @ 00:41am


Allright, Jazz is not a part of Rock & Roll and never was, I take it back. L-7 has spoken and we're not worthy.
Oh, BTW, if you want to see something ridiculous, I'd suggest you take a look at your own posts for a start.

MINGUS MINGUS MINGUS MINGUS MINGUS

Enough said.

Posted by denyo on Thursday, 03.25.10 @ 05:19am


denyo...That's okay, L-7 is like a lot of other people on this site; talks a lot of junk with no substance and gives very little examples. I think you could say Mingus and Coltrane were at least "similar", wouldn't you...???

Posted by Gitarzan on Thursday, 03.25.10 @ 06:36am


There is some jazz in rock but not Coltrane..and there is no rock in what Coltrane did. }Oh please lord please save me from this foolish topic}

think that "Eight Miles High" and "Light My Fire" should be enough evidence for his influence
.
If you hear Coltrane in the about, you may want to ask the voices in your head what horse will win the next race..I am sure it is a sure bet..
As stated before there is more Mozart in rock than Coltrane..End of this pointless topic.

Posted by L-7 on Thursday, 03.25.10 @ 07:28am


I gave you one (of many) example of a great jazz/rock fusion guitarist (oh, wait a minute...they can't be "fused")...heavily influenced by Coltrane (both self admitted AND you can hear it in his playing) covering a jazz standard (one of many to be covered by "rock" musicians) that also happened to be covered by other "rock" musicians...you, in turn, can only talk junk. You need to say less and listen more!!

The notion that Coltrane hasn't influenced rock artists is utterly and completely ridiculous...period.

Posted by Gitarzan on Thursday, 03.25.10 @ 07:52am


The notion that Coltrane hasn't influenced rock artists is utterly and completely ridiculous...period.

Posted by Gitarzan on Thursday, 03.25.10 @ 07:52am

Yes your statement is true people that play rock have heard of Coltrane ,Mozart, Beethoven,and many different types of musicians.Yes there are sax drums,guitar, piano, woodwinds, brass, strings in rock .Yes Jazz is a off shoot of blues, Yes jazz can be found in Rock I do not recall Mr Coltrane doing rock or blues. I must of missed that show! So in a abstract left field way one could say Coltrane had some influence.. but so did , militarily marching bands,Drum bugle corps ,even nursery rhymes ,can be found in "ROCK"
A true stretch but with the help of little voices in your head it can all make perfectly good sense..
As mentioned before let us put Mozart in also..

Posted by L-7 on Thursday, 03.25.10 @ 08:16am


I agree with Gitarzan and others. We should induct Coltrane and the US Marines Marching Band,, Also I would like to put a pitch on my high school marching band.. I know a few very famous rock stars that heard them... PS Mozart is a must... Best put in Francis Scott Key!! Hendrix did The Star-Spangled Banner.

Posted by mrxyz on Thursday, 03.25.10 @ 11:37am


Maybe the reason they're dragging their feet with inducting Coltrane is that they know they made a mistake putting Miles Davis as a Performer and not Early Influence and they don't want to repeat the mistake with Coltrane. They also can't put Coltrane in as an Early Influence because it would make no sense having Coltrane in as an Influence and Davis as a Performer

In other words, they dug themselves into a hole

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 07.12.10 @ 13:07pm


Also why does it say he's been eligible since 1981 (81-25 = 56) when his earliest recordings came from 1945 and not 1956?

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 07.12.10 @ 13:09pm


"Also why does it say he's been eligible since 1981 (81-25 = 56) when his earliest recordings came from 1945 and not 1956?"

Why does this site say that anyone was eligible before 1985/86? How can someone be eligible for a Hall that doesn't exist?

Posted by Chalkie on Monday, 07.12.10 @ 13:19pm


Yeah I know, doesn't make much sense does it? I guess it's just how it was set up with the 25 year thing

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 07.12.10 @ 13:43pm


It may just be that FRL didn't realize that he'd released recordings before '56.

Posted by Philip on Monday, 07.12.10 @ 15:30pm


THE PULITZER

2010 Hank Williams
2008 Bob Dylan
2007 John Coltrane
2006 Thelonious Monk
1999 Duke Ellington
1998 George Gershwin
1982 Milton Babbitt
1976 Scott Joplin
1974 Roger Sessions

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.20.11 @ 04:25am


You would think that the Rock Hall would be in a mad rush to induct someone like John Coltrane.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 05.18.11 @ 05:58am


I'd induct only a handful of Jazz artists into the Hall (mostly in the Early Influence category)... and Coltrane would certainly be one of them.

Ornette Coleman
John Coltrane
Duke Ellington
Dizzy Gillespie
Herbie Hancock
Rahsaan Roland Kirk
Charles Mingus
Thelonious Monk
Charlie Parker
Sun Ra

Like, maybe that ten...

Posted by Chalkie on Thursday, 08.18.11 @ 20:46pm


A Love Supreme alone warrants it.

Posted by GFW on Sunday, 01.29.12 @ 16:38pm


I'd induct only a handful of Jazz artists into the Hall (mostly in the Early Influence category)... and Coltrane would certainly be one of them.

Ornette Coleman
John Coltrane
Duke Ellington
Dizzy Gillespie
Herbie Hancock
Rahsaan Roland Kirk
Charles Mingus
Thelonious Monk
Charlie Parker
Sun Ra

Like, maybe that ten...

Posted by Chalkie on Thursday, 08.18.11 @ 20:46pm

Says you, hipster. Except for Herbie Hancock and Duke Ellington, I see no one else on your elitist list worthy of going into the RRHOF as an Early Influence. Bebop and free jazz are the aural equivalents of masturbation. Thelonious Monk's Blue Monk almost made me go deaf. It sounds like something you'd hear on Sesame Street.

Now if you want to talk about jazz artists who should be inducted as Early Influences, Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, and Cab Calloway are all solid candidates. Louis Armstrong and Louis Jordan are already in as Early Influences, and quite deservedly, I might add.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 04.16.12 @ 22:48pm


I agree with Zach for the most part, but nothing would ever make me turn against A Love Supreme.

Posted by GFW on Tuesday, 04.17.12 @ 11:29am


That's fine, GFW. If you enjoy some avant-garde jazz, that's your choice and no one can take it away from you. I actually gave A Love Supreme a listen not too long ago based on the strength of your recommendation. It's certainly preferable to the overblown pomposity of Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, and some of the other big names in the bebop/avant-garde/free jazz camps. I can't stomach anything else by Coltrane, but A Love Supreme is an exception.

When it comes to jazz, I listen to Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Count Basie, Woody Herman, Artie Shaw, Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong, George Benson, very early Kenny G (most of his material is dreck, but not the earlier, funk-influenced stuff), and Fats Waller, to name some. I'm partial to pre-WWII jazz, although there are a few exceptions.

I'll never understand why the most militant proponents of avant-garde jazz insist that it is intellectual music that demands listening and patience. Doesn't all music inherently require one to listen to it? Even dance music requires one to at least give it some attention. Also, calling something "avant-garde" doesn't necessarily make it deep and intellectual. Music is subjective. What one person interprets from a song may be completely different from what someone else does. I personally consider Thelonious Monk's stuff to be schizophrenic, jumbled nonsense, but that's my take. Somebody else may have a completely different perspective on it.

Posted by Zach on Wednesday, 05.30.12 @ 22:50pm


John Coltrane should be in fo'sho.

Posted by GFW on Sunday, 09.2.12 @ 16:12pm


People who set the standards to beat and were true originals like John Coltrane, Tim Buckley, Nick Drake, Kate Bush, Brian Eno ect.

don't get much attention from the hall, kind of pathetic

Posted by mikhail on Saturday, 02.23.13 @ 22:53pm


Boy do I wish I could delete my previous comments on this page. I acquired a copy of the 1963 album John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman back in the spring this year. It goes without saying that that album converted me into a 'Trane fan (as well as my introduction to one of the most underappreciated and emotional singers). His solos are so romantic and complex, and complement Hartman's tender vocals so perfectly. I have yet to really dig deeper into Coltrane's catalogue of music, but I will certainly be keeping tabs on him.

Posted by Zach on Tuesday, 09.30.14 @ 17:11pm


Good to see you come around on Coltrane. try 'A Love Supreme.'

I have a feeling if you explored Miles Davis more closely, you might also change your tune on him too.

Posted by Dezmond on Tuesday, 09.30.14 @ 20:37pm


Thanks, Dez! I've heard a bit of A Love Supreme and it's certainly good, but I must give the full album a listen soon.

As for Miles, it'll be a long time before I subject myself to another listening of Bitches' Brew. It's kind of overbearing to me on hard it tries to incorporate a more "rock-friendly" sound. Fusion's never been my favorite style of jazz; I go more for swing/big band, bebop, cool, ragtime/Dixieland, and vocalists. I'm probably more likely to investigate Miles's earlier work simply because of how overexposed BB has become and that it's become too easy a choice for people to point out as his best album.

If you wish to know, these cats comprise my all-time favorites for jazz (No particular order):

Jelly Roll Morton
Bix Beiderbecke
Louis Armstrong
Count Basie
Cab Calloway
The Mills Brothers
Billie Holiday
Louis Jordan
Fats Waller
Charlie Christian
Django Reinhardt
Stéphane Grappelli
Billy Eckstine
Slim Gaillard
Woody Herman
Nat King Cole (His Trio years are absolutely essential)
Charlie Parker
Dizzy Gillespie
Vince Guaraldi
The Four Freshmen
Louis Prima
Keely Smith
Ahmad Jamal
Bobby Darin
George Benson

Posted by Zach on Tuesday, 09.30.14 @ 21:00pm


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