Bob Dylan

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer

Category: Performer

Inducted in: 1988

Inducted by: Bruce Springsteen

Nominated in: 1988

First Eligible: 1988 Ceremony


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 1988 (ranked #5) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Bob Dylan (1962)
The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (1963)
Another Side of Bob Dylan (1964)
The Times They Are a-Changin' (1964)
Bringing It All Back Home (1965)
Highway 61 Revisited (1965)
Blonde On Blonde (1966)
John Wesley Harding (1967)
Nashville Skyline (1969)
Blood On The Tracks (1975)
The Basement Tapes (1975)
Desire (1976)
Time Out Of Mind (1997)
Love And Theft (2001)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Blowin' In The Wind (1963)
Don't Think Twice, It's Alright (1963)
Masters Of War (1963)
The Times They Are a-Changin' (1964)
Maggie's Farm (1965)
Desolation Row (1965)
Subterranean Homesick Blues (1965)
Positively 4th Street (1965)
Like A Rolling Stone (1965)
Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 (1966)
Just Like A Woman (1966)
All Along The Watchtower (1967)
Lay Lady Lay (1969)
Knockin' On Heaven's Door (1973)
Forever Young (1974)
Tangled Up In Blue (1975)
Hurricane (1976)

Bob Dylan @ Wikipedia

Bob Dylan Videos

Comments

75 comments so far (post your own)

hes the shit

Posted by me on Saturday, 12.2.06 @ 14:10pm


He's the fa shizl/

Posted by me2 on Wednesday, 02.14.07 @ 09:43am


He is simply the best.....

Posted by Edy on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 11:20am


He is also the most overrated artist of all time next to Nirvana and The Beatles

Posted by Harrison on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 15:49pm


Maybe, but when you're responsible for turning rock into an art-form, I think you earn a modicum respect even from non-fans. (That's about Dylan, not the Beatles, in case anyone thought overwise).

Posted by Liam on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 16:53pm


He is also the most overrated artist of all time next to Nirvana and The Beatles (Harrison)

Wow - that maybe the most ridiculous statement I have ever read.

(That's about Dylan, not the Beatles, in case anyone thought overwise). (Liam)

Your lack of understainding and rerspect of the Beatles continually amazes me. But I have read all your arguements on this subject, and they make me giggle each and every time.

Posted by Dameon on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 17:28pm


Hmmm I can see how Bob Dylan would be overrated by RS Ragazine. After all, on their "Immortal" (immortal my ass) list, they put Dylan at #2 ahead of The Rolling Stones and get this, Elvis. Yes, Dylan ahead of Elvis it's not a joke.

As for The Beatles being overrated. Well, you can call The Rolling Stones overrated too. Hell you can call anybody overrated (Queen, U2, Led Zeppelin, The Clash, etc). Although I have to agree with the statement "Nirvana is one of the most overrated bands of all time."

Posted by Mr. Octagon on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 17:53pm


So you don't think Dylan started artistic rock, Dameon? You think it was those four f*cking scousers with that oh-so-commercial Sgt. Pepper album, with such moments of ingenuity as "When I'm Sixty-Four," arguably the worst pop song of all time?

Not much I can find to "understaind and rerspect" (man, that's one SIC take on English) about a pop band as trivial as the Beatles, but I actually do like a lot of their material.

Posted by Liam on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 18:21pm


Actually, "a lot" is overstating it.

Posted by Liam on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 18:23pm


I realize you said "Arguebly" Liam, but I think "Yellow Submarine" "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-da" or "I Am the Walrus"(which always makes me puke) are all just as bad if not worse than "When I'm Sixty Four"

And I always couldn't stand the last 3 minutes of "Hey Jude"

Posted by Mr. Octagon on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 18:41pm


Now THAT'S interesting: I actually really love "I Am the Walrus," and I find everything about "Hey Jude" utterly boring, aside from the coda in the last few minutes, which I actually really like! But yeah, "Yellow Submarine" and "Ob-La-Di.." have always struck me as moronic crap and being among the worst tracks on their respective albums.

Posted by Liam on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 18:55pm


Agree with Liam - Walrus is not bad....but the other two are lame, at least for me

Posted by Wayback on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 19:01pm


Anyone that refers to the Beatles, one of the most influential bands of all time (simply undeniable), as "trivial" cannot be taken seriously ever!

Posted by Blue Water on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 19:05pm


Understand, my very first record was the 45 RPM of "She Loves You" (I was about 9 years old, maybe), and I learned to play the guitar listening to "Meet The Beatles" (again, still very young), so I have kind of a soft spot (not my head) for the Beatles. I will admit that they did have some stuff here and there that I didn't care for at all, but the Beatles in general were pretty much my first "big bang" of popular music.

As for Dylan, I never really cared much for him, but I'll be the first one to step up and say what a tremendous influence he has been. As in guitar players, it's hard for me to put legendary artists in any particular order. Some where originals, others had overwhelming influence, others took the music where it had never been before. It's all subjective, I guess...

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 19:10pm


Dylan is beyond cool
There is real very little to say.. He is DYLAN..
A living Prophet.. Every 100 years we get lucky with a few

Posted by mrxyz on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 19:14pm


"Anyone that refers to the Beatles, one of the most influential bands of all time (simply undeniable), as "trivial" cannot be taken seriously ever!"

So what adjectives run through your mind in regards to "Don't Pass Me By," "Bungalow Bill," "Piggies," "Wild Honey Pie," "Penny Lane" and the aforementioned "When I'm Sixty-Four"?

Posted by Liam on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 19:32pm


Cute little diities that work. Then I listen to Across the Universe, Strawberry Fields, Rain, Dear Prudence, I'm Tired, The medley from Abbey Road and a hundred of other songs and know that there is no one that matches them.

And Piggies and Bungalow Bill were great songs, but you had to be there. And you weren't. Stick with what you know Liam.

We could have used your help with Coven fanboy.

Posted by Dameon on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 22:01pm


Since this appears to be "take your shot at the Beatles day," I'll take mine.

I think other than the George Harrison tunes- Abbey Road is full of potholes....unfinished tripe about policeman jumping out of bathrooms and old men with bad manners. And Maxwell's Silver Hammer is just plain dreck.

Posted by classicrocker on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 23:27pm


And Piggies and Bungalow Bill were great songs, but you had to be there. And you weren't. Stick with what you know Liam.

Posted by Dameon on Sunday, 09.28.08 @ 22:01pm
--------------------------------------------------
Please understand... please... I am not picking on you specifically.

I have heard this comment, or seen it on here, from many other folks. It is a common defense against younger rock fans by older ones, and I have always felt it was a ridiculous way to defend "classic" rock. Until recently I found I could not properly articulate why this was, despite the fact that I could relate why certain elements of this were wrong. Then I found this:

"Kill Your Idols" - Jim De Rogatis/Carmel Carillo (2004) Barricade Books

pg. 7
"Primarily members of Generation X & Y (with a few strays who are, technically speaking, demographic Baby Boomers, though they identify philosophically as X'ers), the men and women who've written for this book resent the notion that they missed out on everything just because they weren't at Woodstock. They've seen the movie and it sucked, and many of them have been to raves in warehouses and muddy fields that had much cooler soundtracks, not to mention better drugs. How much of the "classic rock" of the last fifty years is defended by the lame notion that, "You really had to be there?" Shouldn't a great album speak to you even if you weren't?

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 09.29.08 @ 05:06am


CC - I have to disagree with you somewhat. Yeah, fans defend what they grew up with. But I for one grow tiresome when someone tries to discount the importance of bands such as the Beatles by highlighting what they perceive to be the bands worst records. And I will use the songs mentioned as an example. Unlike CSN, Dylan and many others, the Beatles anti-extablishment songs were different, almost a comical feel to them. Piggies was one of them. And why not? I was tired of watcing the body count on CBS. It was depressing. It didn't always need to be so serious. The Beatles could make you smile even with all the b.s. that was going on at the time and Piggies was a great example of that. As for Bunglalow Bill, it was a riot of a song. They didn't always have to play serious to get points across. And they didn't always have to try and make a point with each song. I guess we all decipher different meanings from different songs. And maybe that is why some people say that you had to be there.

The Beatles were clearly the most consistent band of the last 45 years. Not every song can be a masterpiece. Post 1962, there were The Beatles, Dylan and The Who and then there was everyone else.

Posted by blah-blah-blah on Monday, 09.29.08 @ 05:22am


The book I described is a bunch of modern critics tearing the heck out of everything, from the Beatles to Beach Boys, Zeppelin to Elvis Costello, Marley to the Dead Kennedy's. There's even younger critics tearing apart U2, Nirvana, Public Enemy, the Smashing Pumkins, and Radiohead. No one is spared (even Beefheart"s "Trout Mask Replica" get's torn apart. Truly, TRULY refreshing!). In doing so, it partially hits the nail on the head to what I've been saying, to a degree here. I do think the writers tend to fall all over themselves w/standard sociological Bull****. It's amazing how the fear of music AS music runs through musical criticism. Musical criticism??? HA! A little bit is necessary here & there, but too much runs into that hideous cultural safety zone that we can all do w/out. Any icon that's not sitting on a perpetual tether, ready for instant re-evaluation, is no real icon, but a safety shield for those who fear the progress of rock.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 09.29.08 @ 05:23am


These arguments raised an interesting point. I think Bob Dylan is a great guy but I never could see what exactly was so great about some of his music. "Like a Rolling Stone" and "The Times They Are A-Changin" aren't good songs. I don't care how much meaning they have or how influential they were, as songs they are about a 5 or 6 out of 10. I still like "Blowin' in the Wind" and "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35" though. But come on! The man can't sing!

Posted by Elliott on Saturday, 10.11.08 @ 11:26am


The Times They Are A Changing was in the Watchmen movie, as well as All Along The Watchtower.

Posted by S.R on Tuesday, 03.17.09 @ 17:55pm


I think Bob Dylan really sucks. People say he can change his genre of music, but I haven't heard him sing anything but boring folk. I would love to see him belt out some REAL ROCK or some POP. But what he generates is for old, stodgy, naval gazers.

Posted by Looeez on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 17:30pm


I agree with boring, but I would have to add mind-numbing, lacking creativity, ugly, uninspiring, outdone by his son (Wallflowers? yikes...), and, well, I just don't get why any one would listen to his music. The one guy would tried to get me to like Dylan was unable to show me any music that I could get the least bit excited about. I think he listened to him only to impress other people, which he wasn't doing.

Posted by Garvey on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 17:32pm


I'm not the biggest Dylan fan, but I certainly wouldn't criticize his influence or his impact on rock music.

"Don't judge a book by it's cover..."

Posted by Gitarzan on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 17:47pm


many people feel that Bob Dylan's impact has been bloated/exaggerated/overrated by people who like Garvey mentioned think they can impress others if they mention Dylan's name.

Sort of like a Churchill or Einstein complex going on

I think I'm about to get bulldozed by Dylan lovers now

Posted by Marty on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 17:51pm


Well, critics of Dylan don't call him "St. Dylan" for no reason.

I can see where Garvey was going with this, it almost seems like Bob Dylan has become hyped to an extent that he can do no wrong and nobody can criticize him. (which is a pretty dangerous concept)

Still, his impact is undeniable (even for me, and I've never considered myself a "Dylan fan")

Posted by Keebord on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 17:55pm


This is true, here's a good point in case:

"He is also the most overrated artist of all time next to Nirvana and The Beatles" -some guy called Harrison

Dameon (in response to Harrison): "Wow - that maybe the most ridiculous statement I have ever read."

See what I mean? Even people like Dameon have become brainwashed by Dylanmania

Posted by Garvey on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 17:58pm


Garvey- I'm not sure if Dameon's statement was directed at Bob Dylan being called overrated or The Beatles being called overrated? (Hopefully Dameon can clarify this?)

Posted by Keebord on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 18:00pm


Doesn't matter. Saying someone's opinion is ridiculous is extremely disrespectful. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion

Posted by Garvey on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 18:02pm


I don't know who Bob Dylan is, but I'm sure Steve Perry solo is better

Posted by horryson fard on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 18:06pm


I don't know who Bob Dylan is, but I'm sure Steve Perry solo is better

Posted by horryson fard on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 18:06pm

I sure hope that is a joke!

Posted by Keebord on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 18:07pm


It's important to clarify that it's an opinion, then. There's a lot of people who make statements on here like what they say is a foregone fact. Mine is blanket opinions unless I substantiate something with a reasonably credible source. Calling Dylan (who I'm not a big fan at all) or the Beatles "overrated" is contrary to what most of the music world believes, and probably shows a lack of being aware of the "whole picture". Either that, or they're just being disrespectful...

Posted by Gitarzan on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 19:26pm


That comment was in response to a statement made by someone named Harrison (I Think). He said that Dylan is the most over-rated artist next to The Beatles and Nirvana. I would never say that, and I am not the biggest Dylan fan.

Also, when I said you were not there, so shut-up, it was meant for a specific poster (Liam) who believed the Beatles were not all that impressive as musical artists.

Posted by Dameon on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 20:33pm


I'm pretty sure this whole thing is someone trolling, no one can be this mind numbingly stupid.

Posted by Elastic Man on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 21:45pm


Okay, if you really want to know why Dylan is important, you need to get away from music and focus on the lyrics. Words expressed very, very little in pop music beyond love, youthful aggression, novelty, etc. prior to Bob Dylan. Dylan opened up the floodgates and changed not just what people wrote about...but how pop lyrics appeared in song. A good example: 4th time around on Blonde on Blonde. Dylan gives us a window into an argument between two lovers. What's it about? We don't know. He just lets this scene play out before us. In the thematic context of the entire album, it adds greatly to what Dylan is writing about (chiefly, his relationships with women.) His ability to work on themes added enormous depth to popular music and so did his way with wordplay and symbolism. Listen to Visions of Johanna (Blonde on Blonde) and As I Went Out One Morning (John Wesley Harding) and hear how profoundly different in written style each song's lyrics are. One has elaborate, lush language, the other is a simple, brief sketch. This is just one example.

This artistic leap I think is the foundation of pop music's growth from mere entertainment to (potentially) legitimate art.

Posted by Elastic Man on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 22:10pm


"No one can be this mind numbingly stupid" - Elastic Man

"Stupid is as stupid does!"

Posted by Keebord on Thursday, 07.9.09 @ 23:39pm


Case in point: "Also, when I said you were not there, so shut-up" - Dameon

Case in point, again: "No one can be this mind numbingly stupid" - Elastic Man

The above two comments show an arrogance of character. Compare that to the following statement:

"probably shows a lack of being aware of the "whole picture". Either that, or they're just being disrespectful..." - Gitarzan

Now let me ask a question, of the above 3 commentators, who seems the most reasonable and open-minded? Dameon, Elastic Man, or Gitarzan?

Gitarzan does. By a long shot.

Posted by Garvey on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 11:48am


"Calling Dylan (who I'm not a big fan at all) or the Beatles "overrated" is contrary to what most of the music world believes, and probably shows a lack of being aware of the "whole picture"."

The majority of the people are often wrong. If we look at a historical point of view, the opinions of the majority brought the rise communism, fascism, election of Dictators, wars, etc. I'm not comparing Bob Dylan to Hitler, and I never said anything against The Beatles, but for whatever reason popular culture needed some icon to worship and the icon they chose was Dylan

Why would Dylan be a popular choice? Several reasons: First, he wasn't "Hollywood Hype" he was doing his own thing, secondly, people with low self-esteem needed to feel secure about themselves so they thought if they spoke of Dylan in everyday conversations, they could impress upon other people. Dylan made otherwise shallow people feel secure about themselves. He wasn't radical enough to cause social outrage, but nonconformist enough to cause the status quo to quiver in their shoes.

Posted by Garvey on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 12:07pm


Garvey, just out of curiousity, what made you feel this way? Was it RS ranking him #2 on their unnecessary "Immortal" list or ranking "Like a Rolling Stone" as the greatest song of all time? Or is this animosity towards Dylan something you've been fostering for a long time?

Posted by Keebord on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 12:24pm


I have to comment here.

Garvey, what you need to do is back track a bit farther on the comments and see where my conversation at the time was and who it was with. It was with a young gentlemen from London who was extremely entrenched in Brit-Pop and Alternative. He and I were going at it for awhile.

Finally, I never stated the Beatles or Dylan were over-rated. It was another individual here. I believe his name was Harrison. As for me being a fan or not has nothing to do with anything. I may not be Dylan's biggest fan, but I certainly respect and acknowledge him as one of the most important steps in the evolution of Rock/Pop music. The lyrical content of his songs is amazing, even 45 years later. I just hated his voice, that's all.

If you are going to copy/paste my comments, I suggest you copy the whole statement and not an edited version of it.

And your historical points of view are pretty narrow-minded. Communism, facism and dictators are not brought to the top because of the opinions of the majority. They rose to the top on strong arm tactics and propaganda.

Posted by Dameon on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 12:41pm


"And your historical points of view are pretty narrow-minded. Communism, facism and dictators are not brought to the top because of the opinions of the majority. They rose to the top on strong arm tactics and propaganda."

Which the majority obediently listened to when they should have known better.

But OK I respect your opinion on Dylan. I was a bit carried away early on in my posting, I just don't like to see people worshipping Dylan like he's critically untouchable

Posted by Garvey on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 12:45pm


You have to look at the previous 50 years of history for any country prior to a dictator or specific ideology taking hold in a country. That will usually tell you the reason why the majority may listen to the rantings of a few.

And as for worshipping anything anything. The only thing I get down on my knees for is a beautiful pair of women's legs in a skirt and high heels.

Don't mean to offend any of the ladies here, just being honest.

Posted by Dameon on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 13:35pm


I don't see what you mean/where this dictator argument is going so maybe we should just drop it?

As for leg worship, nothing wrong with that!!

Posted by Garvey on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 13:39pm


Kinda reminds me of the part of "Forrest Gump" when people were mindlessly following him while he was running... until he said "I think I'll go home now"...someone in the crowd yelled "What are we supposed to do now?"...LOL!!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 18:55pm


Garvey - "I just don't like to see people worshipping Dylan like he's critically untouchable"

Garvey, no one said you can't criticize Dylan but let me ask you this...what do people usually "criticize"? "Oh, his voice is so bad." "He's boring." Yes, this is the extant of the criticism you usually see on someone like Dylan and it shows a blatant disregard for what he actually did which no one is addressing for criticism and which I took the opportunity in good faith to explain.

Your "criticism" seems hung up on your perceptions of people and whether or not he elicited social or political change...who cares? That's not the point and it has nothing to do with his art.

If people really want to learn about the guy then they'll get a nice response. Act like a dick and what do you expect? I was nice enough to actually say something substantial afterward.

Posted by Elastic Man on Friday, 07.10.09 @ 22:27pm


I know he was influential to a lot of people (Knockin' on Heaven's Door by GNR is my favorite cover song ever) but I simply can't stand to listen to him. Yeah, he's absolutely a HOFer, no argument here. I just had to say it, I can't stand his singing style or his music, except a few covers by other bands. And it should also be said that I hate how stuck up the guy is. It's ridiculous. I know people have been making him out to be the second coming for years, but that's no excuse. Same problem with the Beatles for me. Thats the difference with the Stones... they aren't as stuck up, they just are there to put on a show, have some fun, and you can hear it in the music, especially Mick Jagger. Incredibly overrated is Dylan and the Beatles. Influential, but very overrated. They might have been the first to do something, but if the Stones did it better, don't give me this crap about how great Bob Dylan is. I bet I could come up with some wacky new way to do something musically, but if I can't put it into the music and make it work well, what good is it???

Posted by Chris on Sunday, 11.22.09 @ 12:57pm


Chris, you sound like you are 11 years old

Posted by Jonny on Sunday, 11.22.09 @ 13:41pm


Chris, you sound like you are 11 years old

Posted by Jonny on Sunday, 11.22.09 @ 13:41pm

I have to disagree with this statement. I see no problem with Chris' statement. He does after all to his post has "his opinion" and a few of the points he brings up are quite valid in my opinion.

Posted by Keebord on Sunday, 11.22.09 @ 21:05pm


Chris, you sound like you are 11 years old

Posted by Jonny on Sunday, 11.22.09 @ 13:41pm

Does this mean his opinion doesn't count if he actually is 11?

Posted by The Drummer on Sunday, 11.22.09 @ 21:05pm


Come on, GnR's "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" is the best cover ever? Everyone's entitled to their opinion, but personally i think GnR's cover of Knockin on Heaven's Door is horrendous, absolutely terrible, one of the worst covers i've heard.

Posted by Jonny on Sunday, 11.22.09 @ 23:18pm


IMO, greatest Dylan cover is 'All Along the Watchtower' by Hendrix.

Posted by Paul in KY on Monday, 11.23.09 @ 06:37am


Dylan as a poet and songwriter? Excellent
Dylan as a singer? Terrible

Posted by Greg on Sunday, 12.13.09 @ 09:11am


one of the worst covers i've heard.

Posted by Jonny on Sunday, 11.22.09 @ 23:18pm

Really? I recommend checking out "Forever Young" by Jay-Z, "I Second That Emotion" by Japan, "You Shook Me All Night Long" by Celine Dion (yes, you read correctly), "American Pie" by Madonna, "Anarchy in the U.K." by Motley Crue "Behind Blue Eyes" by Limp Bizkit or ever have you ever heard "And It Stoned Me" by Bob Dylan? Sounds odd, I know but just listen to it.

Posted by Keebord on Sunday, 12.13.09 @ 09:26am


IMO, the worst cover song I ever heard was "Dock of the Bay" by Michael Bolton. Enough said.

Posted by The Drummer on Sunday, 12.13.09 @ 09:28am


Bob Dylan's version of "And It Stoned Me" is actually quite bad but most of those other songs you mentioned, Keebord, I can say I've had the pleasure of never hearing. Some of them sound just plain disgusting

Posted by Milestones on Sunday, 12.13.09 @ 09:30am


As far as covers go, I recently heard Michael Bolton's version of "White Christmas"...made me want to go shoot myself!

Musically, it was a real low point for me...

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 12.13.09 @ 10:24am


Why do you guys here keep bashing Bolton? He's got some awesome songs!!

Posted by Neil on Sunday, 12.13.09 @ 11:14am


Why do you guys here keep bashing Bolton? He's got some awesome songs!!

Posted by Neil on Sunday, 12.13.09 @ 11:14am

Well, his cover of "Dock of the Bay isn't one of them

Posted by The Drummer on Sunday, 12.13.09 @ 11:23am


THE PULITZER

2010 Hank Williams
2008 Bob Dylan
2007 John Coltrane
2006 Thelonious Monk
1999 Duke Ellington
1998 George Gershwin
1982 Milton Babbitt
1976 Scott Joplin
1974 Roger Sessions

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.20.11 @ 04:29am


Primarily members of Generation X & Y (with a few strays who are, technically speaking, demographic Baby Boomers, though they identify philosophically as X'ers), the men and women who've written for this book resent the notion that they missed out on everything just because they weren't at Woodstock. They've seen the movie and it sucked, and many of them have been to raves in warehouses and muddy fields that had much cooler soundtracks, not to mention better drugs. How much of the "classic rock" of the last fifty years is defended by the lame notion that, "You really had to be there?" Shouldn't a great album speak to you even if you weren't?

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 09.29.08 @ 05:06am

That's one of the most refreshing posts I've ever seen on here, thanks, Cheesecrop.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 03.28.11 @ 03:39am


That's one of the most refreshing posts I've ever seen on here, thanks, Cheesecrop.


Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 03.28.11 @ 03:39am


--------------------------------------------------
Note - That was taken from a book:

"Kill Your Idols" - Jim De Rogatis/Carmel Carillo (2004) Barricade Books

It can be found on page 7.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 03.28.11 @ 17:32pm


Ah, I see, gotta get my hands on that.

In fact, I think at some point I ran into one or two posts on here somewhere by you quoting that book. They dealt with ripping apart the various decades of rock music, the posts were from a while back.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 03.29.11 @ 03:06am


Yeah, turns out it was one the Doors page, we actually had a discussion about it several months ago, I even used the word "refreshing" to describe it there, lol.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 03.29.11 @ 03:13am


Bob Dylan is an annoying wart that won't go away. Just like U2, R.E.M., and The B52s!

Posted by Loop on Friday, 05.20.11 @ 06:37am


Bruce Springsteen once said this about Bob Dylan's influence on him: "Bob freed your mind the way Elvis freed your body." He is the uncontested poet of the rock and roll era and the pre-eminent singer/songwriter for the past four decades.

Whether singing a political protest song, creating a new genre of rock or delivering one of his abstract compositions, Dylan had a rare ability reach and affect listeners with thoughtful lyrics.

As a songwriter, he pioneered several different forms of songwriting, from confessional singing to winding, stream-of-consciousness narratives. As a singer, he shattered the notion that a performer had to have a good voice in order to perform, thus redefining the singer's role in rock and roll. As a musician, he created several new genres of rock music, particularly folk rock and country rock.

He redesigned the folk scene in the early 60s by turning away from traditional songs and writing his own songs, brought in the maturation of rock when he went electric in 1965, and brought together rock and country by the end of the decade. And that is just the tip of the musical iceberg. His force as a songwriter was evident at the peak of his popularity in the 60s as the Beatles' move toward introspective songwriting would not have happened without him.

While he has played the role of a renegade throughout much of his career, Bob has always reminded the rock community of the music's roots by returning to them. With songs like "Blowin' in the Wind" and "Tangled Up in Blue", he has provided a soundtrack on our restlessness and with his biting, cryptic lyrics served to capture and define the feelings of a generation. For all this, he has been called a spokesman and yet, Bob won't admit to being a poet, rather seeing himself as a trapeze artist.

By the time of his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988, Bob's massive influence on folk and rock had been completed as singers and bands from Crosby, Stills and Nash and Jefferson Airplane to Tom Petty and Jackson Browne have drawn from Dylan's singing and lyrics.

Keep it going, Bob!

Posted by Andrew on Sunday, 03.10.13 @ 23:29pm


1: Highway 61 Revisited
2: Blood On The Tracks
3: Blonde On Blonde
4: The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
5: Bringing It All Back Home
6: The Times They Are A-Changin'
7: Bob Dylan
8: Another Side Of Bob Dylan
9: Time Out Of Mind/Love And Theft

Notable: John Wesley Harding, Desire, Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid

Posted by GFW on Monday, 05.6.13 @ 04:18am


I think Hurricane must be listed under 1975 (for the single) and not under 1976 (for the apparition on the album Desire)

Posted by Florian on Friday, 10.25.13 @ 09:14am


I think Hurricane must be listed under 1975 (for the single) and not under 1976 (for the apparition on the album Desire)

Posted by Florian on Friday, 10.25.13 @ 09:15am


I never understood why Bob Dylan is considered such a great songwriter. Most of his lyrics are plane and simple. He sucks! I can't stand Bob Dylan! I don't like his voice! I don't like his music! I don't like the way he looks! He annoys the hell out of me! An annoying wart that won't go away. He always looks like he's on drugs and about to fall over! Leonard Cohen is a much better writer, a better performer, and he's much better looking. He stands up straight and sits up straight. He's a better dresser and knows how to present himself in public. Give me a Leonard Cohen afterworld so I can sigh eternally. Leonard Cohen is a genius.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 11.13.13 @ 18:04pm


There is a new Leonard Cohen tribute album coming out and it's called...

...Because We Can't Stand Bob Dylan: A Tribute To The Music Of Leonard Cohen

No, not really!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 11.14.13 @ 08:07am


I prefer Leonard Cohen over Bob Dylan.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 11.16.13 @ 08:23am


Bob Johnston RIP

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 08.22.15 @ 00:29am


Overrated!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 04.25.16 @ 22:08pm


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