Bill Monroe

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer

Category: Early Influence

Inducted in: 1997

Inducted by: Ricky Skaggs and Emmylou Harris


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 1995 (ranked #27 in the Influences - Pre-Rock Era category) .


Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Mule Skinner Blues (1940)
Blue Moon of Kentucky (1946)

Bill Monroe @ Wikipedia

Bill Monroe Videos

Comments

5 comments so far (post your own)

The father of Blue Grass. Well deserved.

Posted by Randy on Friday, 10.5.07 @ 12:20pm


This is one induction that I simply don't understand...Bill Monroe is about the furthest thing from Rock you can imagine! Now some of the old rockers recorded some of his stuff, most notably Elvis ("Blue Moon Of Kentucky"), which sounded nothing like the originals. Those artists came up with their own way of doing it. In fact, Bill Monroe didn't even like Elvis' version (until he started getting royalty checks, I suppose). He was strictly Bluegrass, which influenced country but it kinda stopped right there. Now Hank Williams, whose country sound was more blues oriented, has been covered a lot by rockers. Those recordings remained pretty true to the original, though, so I can understand Hank's influence. But Bill Monroe....???

Posted by Terry on Thursday, 02.14.08 @ 17:34pm


Bill Monroe had a huge influence on a lot of early rock artists..Chuck Berry, Elivs and Buddy Holly. The only way to understand that is to truly listen to Monroe's music and you will hear many future rock guitar "licks" in his mandolin solos. His music was driven by a solid foundation of blues. Well deserved!!

Posted by AW on Saturday, 05.2.09 @ 05:34am


"This is one induction that I simply don't understand...Bill Monroe is about the furthest thing from Rock you can imagine! Now some of the old rockers recorded some of his stuff, most notably Elvis ("Blue Moon Of Kentucky"), which sounded nothing like the originals. Those artists came up with their own way of doing it. In fact, Bill Monroe didn't even like Elvis' version (until he started getting royalty checks, I suppose). He was strictly Bluegrass, which influenced country but it kinda stopped right there. Now Hank Williams, whose country sound was more blues oriented, has been covered a lot by rockers. Those recordings remained pretty true to the original, though, so I can understand Hank's influence. But Bill Monroe....???

Posted by Terry on Thursday, 02.14.08 @ 17:34pm

Just because Bill Monroe himself was not a fan of rock 'n' roll doesn't mean that his music wasn't an influence on rock 'n' roll. Frank Sinatra didn't like rock 'n' roll, and yet he collaborated with Bono when they performed I've Got You Under My Skin.

Chuck Berry counts Bill Monroe as one of his influences. You already brought Elvis's cover of Blue Moon of Kentucky and his love of Monroe's music.

This article here gives a pretty good account of the effect which Monroe's music on another rockabilly legend, Carl Perkins:

http://www.thebluegrassspecial.com/archive/2011/feb2011/bill-monroe-carl-perkins-feb2011.php

If you want to hear Monroe songs that give an indication of his influence on rock 'n' roll, give the following songs a listen:

Rocky Road Blues,
Sally Jo
Blue Yodel No. 7

There's others, but these three should do for starters.

And yes, Monroe is totally qualified to be an Early Influence. I've recently been listening to some of his material. There's not enough superlatives to describe the beauty of Bill Monroe's music.

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 10.14.12 @ 03:27am


EDIT: This article here gives a pretty good account of the effect which Monroe's music had on another rockabilly legend, Carl Perkins.

and

You already brought up Elvis's cover of Blue Moon of Kentucky and his love of Monroe's music.

Further evidence of Monroe's influence on rock 'n' roll:

"Carl had some of the same musical influences as Elvis, in this case Bill Monroe. Listening to the radio, Carl could hear the sound was close, the band clicked and thumped like Clayton's (Carl's brother and bass player), but the guitar had a full thick sound, whereas Carl played his hard and trebly. The voice was something else, at once familiar and mysterious, but Carl knew where Elvis came from stylistically, because in the sense they were kindred spirits: Bill Monroe. He could hear Monroe in Elvis' upper register, in the infliction of certain lyrics as 'Kentucky' with the emphasis on the second and third syllables (Blue moon of Ken-tucky keep on shinin')." - From the Article Carl Perkins - Blue Suede Shoes and Elvis Presley on Elvis Australia (http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/carl_perkins_blue_suede_shoes.shtml)

Also, the story of Elvis Presley asking Carl Perkins "Do you like Bill Monroe" during their first meeting isn't true. David McGee's article "Always There: The looming presence of Bill Monroe is conjured in a grand tribute to his music" set the record straight:

"And Elvis and Carl did talk about Bill Monroe, but only when their paths first crossed in the Sun studio after Carl and his brothers had been signed to the label. Their first meeting, months earlier at a high school gymnasium in Bethel Springs, TN, where Elvis was performing, was brief and centered on whether Elvis thought the Perkins brothers might get a hearing at Sun Records, since for the past few years in the tonks of Jackson, TN, they had been playing the same type of music Presley was starting to make hay with."

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 10.14.12 @ 04:06am


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