Bauhaus

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 2004 (The 2005 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? No  what's this?


Inducted into Rock Hall Projected in 2031 (ranked #304) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
In The Flat Field (1980)
Mask (1981)
The Sky's Gone Out (1982)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Bela Lugosi's Dead (1979)

Bauhaus @ Wikipedia

Bauhaus Videos

Will Bauhaus be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

26 comments so far (post your own)

Wow, no comments for Bauhaus, the founding fathers of Goth, and easily that genre's most influential band?

Posted by ms.music on Wednesday, 10.1.08 @ 05:57am


"the founding fathers of Goth"

Hardly.

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 10.1.08 @ 09:47am


"the founding fathers of Goth"

Hardly.

Posted by Liam on Wednesday, 10.1.08 @ 09:47am

************************************************

That's what AllMusic says. I guess you could say Joy Division and Siouxsie and the Banshees came first, and I certainly wouldn't argue, but Bauhaus always felt like the first full-on Goth band. Goth, at least to me, is distinctly post-punk, and Joy Division and Siouxsie, at least initially, were tied to the Punk Movement although they certainly were not full-fledge punk bands and had a greater overall impact on the future indie movement. The first single from Bauhaus, "Bela Lugosi's Dead" is widely hailed as the definitive goth song, and as the movement grew they were probably the most cited band. The Cure's 79 debut certainly isn't Goth although they got darker with subsequent releases, especially the brilliant Pornography, and are often cited as well.

Okay I'm rambling here! Curious though if you think Bauhaus had any influence, or even if you like them. I realize Goth isn't one of rock's most important genres, but I think some great bands either dabbled in goth or had their roots there. Unfortunately goth produced it's share of garbage as well.

Posted by ms.music on Thursday, 10.2.08 @ 00:47am


I just got back from taking my sons to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and could not find a single reference to Peter Murphy or Bauhaus. I am wondering if I missed it? or if there is nothing there? They were a HUGE influence on so many bands that it just wouldn't make sense not to have something on them!?

Posted by dancetheghost on Monday, 05.31.10 @ 18:59pm


Let's settle this. Alright: Bauhaus, my fellow Northampton boys, released "Bella Lugosi's Dead" in August 1979, and AMG calls them the first goth-rock band. Siouxsie and the Banshees had their first original material out first, but AMG doesn't call them goth. The Cure's first album was out in June 1979, but that's not considered goth. "Killing an Arab" is considered post-punk, though it was released in December '78 (which would actually mean that The Cure invented post-punk and not Joy Division as I previously thought.) So I'm going to go along with Bauhaus being the first goth band, which means that they deserve induction.

Posted by Sam on Saturday, 06.5.10 @ 17:37pm


Sam - "'Killing an Arab' is considered post-punk, though it was released in December '78 (which would actually mean that The Cure invented post-punk and not Joy Division as I previously thought.)"

It's not useful to use record releases to define the point Post-Punk was created because these bands were playing live gigs for well over a year before their initial recordings came out. Robert Smith had already written much of what would appear on the first Cure album earlier in the year. On the same token, much of Joy Division's material for Unknown Pleasures existed by May of 1978.

Joy Division appeared on several releases including their own first EP An Ideal for Living by the time Killing an Arab came out.

I'm aware some people don't consider An Ideal for Living Post-Punk. This is frankly bullshit in my opinion. No Love Lost and especially Leaders of Men qualify as Post-Punk. They clearly mark the transition between the amateurish Warsaw material and the first "recorded as Joy Division" single Digital/Glass from A Factory Sample (also December '78.) An Ideal for Living, recorded as Warsaw/released as Joy Division, is the precise moment the band changed into Post-Punk (note: An Ideal For Living was recorded in December 1977, released in June 1978.)

In any case, The Fall, definitively Post-Punk, had released their debut EP in August 1978 (and made their first two John Peel appearances) before Killing an Arab. Gang of Four's First single came out December 10th, a week and a half earlier than The Cure single. Wire, Magazine, and Public Image Ltd. all released albums before The Cure single. For some reason people have begun to classify Pink Flag (1977) as simply Punk, which is total revisionism, but Wire's second album came out in August 1978 and it is inarguably Post-Punk.

But then I'm not one who thinks the line between Punk and Post-Punk is clearly drawn because it isn't. Patti Smith, Television, Talking Heads, Suicide, The Clash, Sex Pistols, Joy Division, The Fall, and Wire are all in the same artistic spirit. The Exploited and other cookie cutter "Punk" shite, however, is not.

Bauhaus can take the "Creators of Goth" title if they want it but I don't think it's anything to be proud of (and Goth always seems more concerned with image than any one sound.)

Posted by Elastic Man on Sunday, 06.6.10 @ 00:39am


Standing ovation, Elastic Man. Excellent post.

My understanding is that the members of Bauhaus have always cringed at the "Goth" label. It had nothing to do with their m.o. and the word didn't really pop up until they had already released at least one album.(Can't remember the exact timeline.)

I've always viewed bands like Bauhaus or the Birthday Party simply as post punk. I don't really apply the "Goth" label until the next wave of bands who took Bauhaus, BP, Joy Division or Siouxsie's leads into a more contrived, cartoonish direction.

Posted by DarinRG on Sunday, 06.6.10 @ 13:48pm


"It's not useful to use record releases to define the point Post-Punk was created because these bands were playing live gigs for well over a year before their initial recordings came out. Robert Smith had already written much of what would appear on the first Cure album earlier in the year. On the same token, much of Joy Division's material for Unknown Pleasures existed by May of 1978.

Joy Division appeared on several releases including their own first EP An Ideal for Living by the time Killing an Arab came out."

Wow, usually takes a while for someone to notice my posts. I haven't listened to "An Ideal for Living", I was just aware that it took them awhile to develop their sound but wasn't sure how long (I know when they started out in '76 they were a full-fledged punk band, and it was partially Martin Hannett's production that took them in the direction they did.)

"But then I'm not one who thinks the line between Punk and Post-Punk is clearly drawn because it isn't. Patti Smith, Television, Talking Heads, Suicide, The Clash, Sex Pistols, Joy Division, The Fall, and Wire are all in the same artistic spirit. The Exploited and other cookie cutter 'Punk' shite, however, is not."

I stand corrected then, and I do agree with that. "Horses" and "Blank Generation" have punk roots (just to use two examples) but also are in a very arty direction.)

"My understanding is that the members of Bauhaus have always cringed at the 'Goth' label. It had nothing to do with their m.o. and the word didn't really pop up until they had already released at least one album.(Can't remember the exact timeline.)"

I don't know, but I'm pretty sure that nowadays Robert Smith cringes at the Goth label as well. I don't know the timeline either.

For the sake of argument: Shall we just say that Wire, The Fall, Television, Gang of Four, Public Image Ltd. Bauhaus, Siouxsie, Birthday Party, Suicide, Joy Division and The Cure should all be inducted to be safe? After all it's possible that they all influenced each other (I'll throw The Damned into that pile as well.)

Excellent post though, Elastic Man.

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 06.6.10 @ 15:57pm


How'd I do with that induction idea by the way? Am I at least within the ballpark (or rugby field) of being right?

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 06.6.10 @ 16:35pm


"For the sake of argument: Shall we just say that Wire, The Fall, Television, Gang of Four, Public Image Ltd. Bauhaus, Siouxsie, Birthday Party, Suicide, Joy Division and The Cure should all be inducted to be safe? After all it's possible that they all influenced each other (I'll throw The Damned into that pile as well.)" -Sam

All are very worthy inductees. The complete overlooking of this era and Krautrock are the two most grating of Cleveland's oversights to me personally.

Also, you're correct that Robert Smith (and Siouxsie Sioux, for that matter)has strenuously objected to being saddled with the "Goth" label.

Posted by DarinRG on Sunday, 06.6.10 @ 17:18pm


Yep, Kraftwerk is one of the most head-scratching omissions even though I'm not a fan. They're way overdue. And New Order have some post-punk connections (obviously), as do The Smiths, and both should be inducted as well. There's no way we can get all of them in, but if we can get half of them in I'll be happy.

Posted by Sam on Monday, 06.7.10 @ 19:03pm


You can also add Depeche Mode to that list.

Posted by DarinRG on Monday, 06.7.10 @ 19:42pm


Alright then, plus The Stone Roses (who I don't like that much), and maybe Happy Mondays (yes I know we've lost all post-punk connections here, but they're related to New Order and The Smiths). After that we get to Radiohead and to Britpop. I'll sort out Britpop fully some other time, but yes to Blur and Suede, I'll tell you that.

Posted by Sam on Monday, 06.7.10 @ 19:56pm


Bauhaus? God yes. That is all.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 03.15.11 @ 15:37pm


Nope. Second to third rate Post Punk.

Posted by Chalkie on Sunday, 05.22.11 @ 15:25pm


Alright, that was harsh... just second rate, but still a no.

Posted by Chalkie on Sunday, 05.22.11 @ 15:36pm


"For the sake of argument: Shall we just say that Wire, The Fall, Television, Gang of Four, Public Image Ltd. Bauhaus, Siouxsie, Birthday Party, Suicide, Joy Division and The Cure should all be inducted to be safe? After all it's possible that they all influenced each other (I'll throw The Damned into that pile as well.)" - Sam

I can't help but feel that IF they ever get to anything Nick Cave related they'll just induct him on his own and ignore the Birthday Party and the Bad Seeds. Obviously I wouldn't mind seeing all those mentioned inducted, but I doubt we'll ever see any of them aside from the Cure and Joy Division, unfortunately.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 12:52pm


Alright, that was harsh... just second rate, but still a no.

Posted by Chalkie on Sunday, 05.22.11 @ 15:36pm

When can we stop with this 1st/2nd/3rd rate nonsense, what is this, the Cold War?

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 12:53pm


Tahvo, that terminology is useful for analysis purposes. Having certain tiers of artists helps people understand where an artist is in relation to others as far as importance, quality, influence, etc. Calling someone "2nd tier" is a shorthand way of judging an artist that is useful because everyone understands what you mean.

Posted by Dezmond on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 13:16pm


I understand that Dezmond, it's just that there's no agreed upon method to rank artists in the said tiers. For example, most of the time it just ends up becoming a matter of opinion (An example would be someone arguing Rush to be a "3rd tier" prog band and someone else arguing Rush to be "2nd tier" with neither providing enough support as to why they feel this way). I'm just using Rush as an example because I recall this exact discussion somewhere.

I guess what I'm trying to say is, if you're going to claim an act is a certain "tier" at least provide some back up as to your reasoning. It may well be a personal thing. I just like knowing people's reasoning behind judging artists, that's all.

I mean if this site had no discussion and was just people voting "yes" or "no" things would get pretty boring.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 10.14.11 @ 13:47pm


Amazing band. Will never get in. In the end, they're in the same boat as Joy Division, Pulp, XTC, and other wonderful British bands who had a minimal sales impact stateside. The Cure will get in down the road, and the Hall will see this induction as their nod to "goth rock."

Posted by David Holmes on Wednesday, 04.11.12 @ 22:21pm


Having thought about it, I don't know if I'd put them in. They were really not first into Goth if you count Joy Division and Siouxsie. They certainly weren't derivative and what they did they mostly did well, but I can't think of that much definitively new stuff that they brought to the table. Maybe a greater emphasis on rhythm and groove, but in a full post-punk context Gang Of Four and Public Image Ltd were there first and Killing Joke were around at the same time.

For quality, the degree to which they're revered in a "goth" context and influence it's a "maybe", but even if we're just creating a post-punk and indie snubs queue that's strictly British then there's still a decent number of bands that are more deserving.

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 08.5.12 @ 18:33pm


I really feel that they should be inducted as Bauhaus/Love and Rockets/Peter Murphy/Daniel Ash/David J/Tones on Tail/Dalis Car since we're so excited about joint nominations/inductions now. That ought to cover all bases.

Posted by DarinRG on Friday, 08.24.12 @ 22:39pm


Of course!
But it's the same case with Siouxsie & The Banshees, Joy Division, The Smiths, Depeche Mode, The Cure...

Posted by BulmaPunkRocker on Sunday, 07.6.14 @ 23:06pm


Peter Cetera is a Bauhaus fan. Peter Cetera wore a Bauhaus shirt in the music video for You're the Inspiration.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 11.28.15 @ 04:09am


Sorry, all. Bauhaus should be in. I wouldn't even consider them Goth, even though unfortunately they have been given that stigmata. :)

Over the yrs. You can here their influence in so many other bands.

They were/are groundbreaking IMO.

I consider them more Glam punk.

Posted by Dave on Saturday, 08.26.17 @ 20:09pm


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